Al Jolson Newswire (Page 2)

Al Jolson Newswire (Page 2)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Al Jolson. (Page 2)

Results 21 - 40 of 58 in Al Jolson

  1. Whether for walks or heavy petting, dog lovers can now connect onlineRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 24, 2017 | The Daily Courier

    Singer Al Jolson coined the exclamation of delight "hot diggity dog" in 1928 after a performance of There's a Rainbow Round My Shoulder. Perry Como took Hot Diggity , a ditty about a being wowed by a particularly lovely lady, to No.

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  2. Brooklyn's Ryan Repertory Tours Singing for the BoysRead the original story

    Jul 11, 2017 | BroadwayWorld.com

    Brooklyn bas Ed Ryan Repertory Company, now in its 45th season, and Family Music Centers are proud to present Singing For The Boys. In a "performance that never was but should have been" Al Jolson , Judy Garland and Deanna Durbin come together in 1943 at the Palace Theatre in New York City for a one-night benefit performance to support the overseas war effort and to entertain the troops.

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  3. Making Magic with an animated 'Magic Flute'Read the original story w/Photo

    Jul 6, 2017 | Cincinnati.com

    ... to the silent film era for inspiration. (It's not by coincidence that 1927 is also the year of the first talkie, Al Jolson's "The Jazz Singer.") Behind the scenes of a rehearsal last week, a split-second ballet played out in semi-darkness behind the ...

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  4. BWW Review: Seth Sikes Bursts with Pride at JUDY, LIZA, BARBRA, ETC.Read the original story w/Photo

    Jul 5, 2017 | BroadwayWorld.com

    ... of "Rock-A-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody" ( Jean Schwartz / Sam M. Lewis / Joe Young ), most famously sung by Al Jolson in but covered by Garland. Sikes called out the fact that he was a White boy performing a song sung by a White woman covering ...

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  5. The Jazz Singer - A Century of FilmRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 15, 2017 | Yorkton This Week & Enterprise

    ... blackface part of a series of steps the main character - Jack Robin, formerly known as Jakie Rabinowitz, played by Al Jolson - takes to distance himself from his own Jewish heritage. The name change itself is a big part of the same theme. It's a ...

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  6. Looking Back: June 9, 2017Read the original story w/Photo

    Jun 9, 2017 | Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

    ... communication to a luncheon meeting of the Alaska Broadcasters Association here yesterday. The million miles which Al Jolson has been promising - since 1909 - to walk for one of his mammy's smiles was never closer to an accurate figure today. At ...

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  7. 1927: Historic hotel burns to the groundRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 7, 2017 | Penticton Herald

    ... sissippi Flood kills 700,000 people... Murderers' Row, the Yankees sweep the World Series... The Jazz Singer, with Al Jolson, first "talkie" motion picture... "Metropolis" released.

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  8. Is that 'offensive' concert program at...Read the original story w/Photo

    Jun 7, 2017 | Morristown Green

    ... complaints. Why the school distributed the inferior black-and-white version, which turns a minority chorister into Al Jolson from The Jazz Singer , is a question that presumably will be answered at the community meeting, at 7 pm on Thursday, June 8, ...

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  9. The Harold Green Jewish Theatre Company and Dancap Productions to Present the Jazz SingerRead the original story w/Photo

    May 16, 2017 | BroadwayWorld.com

    ... songs from the Great American Songbook by legendary composers including Irving Berlin , George Gershwin and Al Jolson . Songs include "Rainbow Round My Shoulder," "Let Me Sing and I'm Happy," and "Blue Skies." THE JAZZ SINGER begins previews May 23, ...

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  10. Inland Empirea s first talking movies predated a The Jazz Singera a " herea s howRead the original story w/Photo

    May 15, 2017 | Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

    Everyone knows the first feature film with music and speaking parts was “The Jazz Singer,” starring Al Jolson, and that didn't premiere until October 1927. But in a headline in the San Bernardino Sun of Sept.

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  11. Michael Arace commentary | No time like the present to get rid of Chief WahooRead the original story w/Photo

    May 14, 2017 | The Columbus Dispatch

    ... scalps and going on the warpath. They were able to use gibberish to invent war cries. They used "Indians" the way Al Jolson applied blackface and sang "Mammy." Al Jolson died in 1950. So it goes. There appeared in Tuesday's editions of The Boston ...

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  12. Songs only a mother could loveRead the original story w/Photo

    May 10, 2017 | NorthJersey.com

    ... it as a sentimental change of pace from her usual racy repertoire. "My Mammy" will be forever associated with Al Jolson in blackface, down on one knee, crooning "I'd walk a million miles for one of your smiles!" to his mother in "The Jazz Singer" ...

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  13. The mother lode of mother songsRead the original story w/Photo

    May 10, 2017 | NorthJersey.com

    ... Ives, and others. This song, introduced by "I Love Lucy's" William Frawley in 1918, later became immortal when Al Jolson bleated it out in the legendary first talking picture, "The Jazz Singer" (1927). The title has led to some confusion. Was Jolson ...

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  14. BWW Previews: Crazy for You at Candlelight Music TheatreRead the original story

    May 5, 2017 | BroadwayWorld.com

    ... 15-year-old song 'plugger' in Tin Pan Alley. 4 years later he wrote "Swanee" which of course became a standard for Al Jolson . He was the only composer EVER to write popular standards for symphony: "Rhapsody In Blue", "American In Paris"; opera, ...

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  15. Mark Morris, man of many arts, to be artist in residence for...Read the original story w/Photo

    May 4, 2017 | Philly.com

    ... gems. Among the films will be the 1933 delight Hallelujah, I'm a Bum! , the 1933 hobo musical starring Al Jolson, Harry Langdon, and Frank Morgan. Also among the films are Tonight We Sing , a 1953 musical biopic of impresario Sol Hurok; and The ...

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  16. Richard Littlejohn on students at the Nus conferenceRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 27, 2017 | Daily Mail

    ... Approved by whom? Jazz hands conjures up an image of George Mitchell's Black and White Minstrels hamming it up to Al Jolson's Mammy. Frankly, I'd have thought the National Union of Students would walk a million miles to avoid any association with ...

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  17. Wednesday: Secret Cinema Delivers Famous FilmsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 17, 2017 | Phillymag.com

    ... Singer , a feature film famous for being the first talkie and infamous for its use of blackface. In this trailer, Al Jolson is seen applying paint to his white face while a narrator extols the virtues of the then-new Vitaphone sound process and ...

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  18. Director, performer resign after Calgary Opera casts white man for Asian roleRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 7, 2017 | Globe and Mail

    ... not been contracted. "It's not like days gone by that you're going to do makeup and things. Thank God the days of Al Jolson are gone - and that is totally inappropriate," McPhee says. "There will be a point when we have to call it and say that's it; ...

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  19. April showers: Five facts about this rainy monthRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 6, 2017 | The Morning Call

    ... ed May Flowers. That's according to a 2015 blog post by whitepages.com. "April Showers" was a song made popular by Al Jolson in 1921. Lyrics include: "Though April showers may come your way/ They bring the flowers that bloom in May."

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  20. Roger Moore cheated on Dorothy Squires and she got revengeRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 31, 2017 | Daily Mail

    ... a gambler and a womaniser, and it was left to her mother to raise their three children. As an adolescent she saw Al Jolson in The Jazz Singer, cinema's first musical in 1927, and vowed to become a singer herself. For six years she performed for ...

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