Canberra, Australia Travel Newswire

Canberra, Australia Travel Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Canberra, Australia Travel.

Results 1 - 20 of 274 in Canberra, Australia Travel

  1. Honey receives national call-upRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday May 25 | The Courier

    BALLARAT Sovereigns young recruit Tayla Honey will represent Australia in August this year after being selected as part of the 20-and-under squad set to take on New Zealand and England. BALLARAT Sovereigns young recruit Tayla Honey will represent Australia in August this year after being selected as part of the 20-and-under squad set to take on New Zealand and England.

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  2. Walking the Centenary Trail in 8 Days: Narrabundah to AinslieRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday May 24 | The RiotACT

    Have you ever thought about walking the Centenary Trail? The 145km loop was established in 2013 to celebrate Canberra's Centenary, and passes over our picturesque mountain scapes, rivers, fields and forests. Not only will you see stunning natural scenery, you'll also explore many of Canberra's suburbs and the Parliamentary Triangle, discovering hidden gems and visiting iconic cultural institutions along the way.

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  3. Canberra city Supabarn to reopen as Coles on June 8Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday May 23 | Sydney Morning Herald

    The entrance has been replaced with red hoarding and a sign indicating the opening date, and that the new Coles will also feature a Liquorland. The closure has left Civic workers and local residents on foot with the options of shopping at Aldi, also in the Canberra Centre, and the IGA in the bus interchange.

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  4. Why don't Canberra houses have front fences?Read the original story w/Photo

    Sunday May 22 | ABC News

    Steven Bailie has been in Canberra for the last 10 years and he poses the question: Why aren't there any front fences in Canberra? The ban on front fences began in 1924 and grew out of a design debate, according to Professor Nicholas Brown, a historian at the Australian National University . "The argument essentially came out of a move from Burley Griffin's concept of a really dense form of development for Canberra to Sir John Sulman, who really took over the planning of Canberra," he said.

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  5. 'Give it back': South Coast man's battle with the British MuseumRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 21 | Illawarra Mercury

    A Bermagui descendant of a Gweagal warrior shot by Captain Cook's marines as they landed in Botany Bay 246 years ago is fighting for the return of important cultural artefacts locked away in London's British Museum. Thirty-eight-year-old Rodney Kelly visited the artifacts that include a shield and two spears during their display earlier this year at the National Museum of Australia as part of the Encounters Exhibition before writing to the British Museum requesting their permanent return to Australia.

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  6. What Canberra can learn from the Gold Coast's light rail systemRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 21 | Sydney Morning Herald

    Lights flash, speakers beep, the doors slide shut and the tram slides forward with a noise akin to air escaping a balloon. I'm on the G:Link, or 'the G:', the Gold Coast's light rail system that serves in many ways as a glimpse of Canberra's future if Capital Metro is rolled out.

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  7. Shielded from the truthRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday May 18 | Bega District News

    Bermagui's Rodney Kelly is fighting for the return of important cultural artifacts locked away in London's British Museum. Rodney Kelly is hoping to visit the British Museum after its refusal to return a Gweagle tribal shield taken in 1770.

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  8. Arms embargo, human rights confront Obama in VietnamRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday May 17 | USA Today

    Pressure to lift a decades-long arms embargo and complaints about continued human rights violations will confront President Obama when he makes his first visit to Vietnam on Monday, 41 years after the end of one of the most divisive wars in American history. Arms embargo, human rights confront Obama in Vietnam Pressure to lift a decades-long arms embargo and complaints about continued human rights violations will confront President Obama when he makes his first visit to Vietnam on Monday, 41 years after the end of one of the most divisive wars in American history.

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  9. Archaeology students dig deeper for local Indigenous heritageRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday May 16 | ABC News

    Following the success of last year's Springbank Island dig , archaeological students at the Australian National University have taken their trowels to Red Hill Camp to search for artefacts from the Ngambri, Ngunawal and Ngarigu people. Masters student and project facilitator Steve Skitmore said the group had been guided by local elders leading up to and during the six-day dig.

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  10. Waratah men face-off in battle to grow the best beard for melanoma causeRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday May 16 | Central Western Daily

    THE largest operating steam locomotive in the Southern Hemisphere will be roaring into Orange in June, and railway fanatics and residents will be able to book trips to nearby villages. The City of Canberra, a Beyer-Garratt 6029 locomotive, will relive some local railway history - the same "locos" once operated in the Orange region.

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  11. Time for a rethink on Manuka Oval planRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday May 16 | The RiotACT

    What began as 1000 apartments has been cut to 650, nine storey units down to seven, basement car parking increased to 1620 spaces and total costs have fallen from $800 million to $550 million. A number of physical changes to the plans also have been listed to what was and still is an unsolicited bid to the ACT Government offering to upgrade iconic Manuka Oval.

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  12. National Library of Australia's locked room with 'too inappropriate' booksRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday May 16 | Daily Mail

    Australia's forbidden books: The padlocked room in the country's biggest library full of books 'too inappropriate for the public' Hundreds of books banned in Australia are hidden in archives in libraries across the country, after being deemed too outrageous to be read by the public. The largest collection, full of books and material that is completely off-limits, is said to be held in the National Library of Australia in a padlocked room.

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  13. How did carp end up in Lake Burley Griffin?Read the original story w/Photo

    Sunday May 15 | ABC News

    Experts estimate carp make up 50 per cent of the fish in Canberra's man-made lake, and possibly up to 85 per cent of the biomass given their size. Former Canberran James Crawford grew up trout fishing in Cooma.

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  14. ACT government suggests wider use of Segways, treating them as bicyclesRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 14 | Sydney Morning Herald

    The ACT government is considering allowing Canberrans to own and operate Segways like bicycles, and has called for public feedback on the idea. The discussion papers say the safety of Segways is "about equivalent" to the safety of cycling and asks whether riders should be allowed to use them on paths and roads, like bike riders, or whether they should be allowed only in pedestrian areas.

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  15. Performers play music marathon to commemorate composer's lifeRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 13 | ABC News

    A group of pianists has gathered to perform a piece of music for over five hours, to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the birth of composer Erik Satie. The musicians took turns playing a solitary grand piano at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra, performing Satie's avant-garde piece Vexations for five-and-a-half hours straight.

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  16. Handmade Canberra team unveils plans for The Local Larder next to Glebe ParkRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday May 12 | The Age

    The team behind Homemade Canberra has announced plans for their new venture, called The Local Larder, overlooking Glebe Park in the heart of the city. Julie Nichols and Rachel Evagelou hope to have their new food, wine, retail and tourism hub open by September or October.

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  17. Gang-gang. Canberra takes its place in the ThingiverseRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday May 12 | The Age

    Two of this column's very recent and critically acclaimed items have discussed, respectively, 3D printing and Canberra's unique-to-Canberra bus shelters. And now those two seemingly very different subjects have achieved a kind of topic marriage.

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  18. Wellington gives its blessing to having Canberra as a sister cityRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday May 11 | Stuff.co.nz

    A council report on the idea, which was debated on Wednesday, suggested the National Museum of Australia and Te Papa could exchange staff, exhibitions and expertise, while Canberra's Woodlands and Wetlands Trust and Wellington's Zealandia wildlife sanctuary could work together on biodiversity issues. There was also talk of the two cities promoting a "two-capital holiday'" into Asian markets, which would be aimed at people with interests in art, mountain biking, festivals, museums, and artisan food.

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  19. Capital Life: What's on in Canberra's arts scene from May 13Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday May 11 | The Age

    There'll be no rolling hills or crashing waves in this new CCAS show, oh no. Rather, the group of women in Obnoxious Ladies in the Australian Landscape have new perspectives on the landscape and their place in it: "Australian art history frequently references male depictions of harsh and unforgiving lands to be conquered or celebrated as a great untouchable beauty often leaving out women's experience altogether," says the gallery.

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  20. Canberra Weekender: What's on in Canberra May 13-15Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday May 11 | Sydney Morning Herald

    SEGUE A two-week boutique micro-festival at The Street theatre filled with Euro-Australian work. Back for its second year, the program showcases artists and companies with links to Austria, Ireland, Spain, Poland, Italy, the UK and Germany.

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