Dulse Newswire

Dulse Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Dulse.

Results 1 - 8 of 8 in Dulse

  1. Material Futures: Central Saint Martins' Students Design for TomorrowRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 22, 2016 | Core77 design blog

    ... a potential future where we stop the traditional production of meet entirely. One solution to satisfying our cravings? Dulse seaweed, a red marine algae that, when fried, apparently tastes no different than bacon. Using this algae as a communicative ...

    Comment?

  2. Walpole Business at the Forefront of Up-And-Coming IndustryRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 29, 2016 | Lincoln County News

    The nutrients present in tidal rivers, including the Damariscotta River, makes the Maine Coast an ideal location to grow seagreens, according to Seth Barker, a founder and partner in the Walpole-based Maine Fresh Sea Farms. A variety of sea vegetables are grown in the waters of Clark's Cove including Alaria, Sugar Kelp, and Dulse.

    Comment?

  3. Walpole Business at the Forefront of Up-And-Coming IndustryRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 24, 2016 | Lincoln County News

    The nutrients present in tidal rivers, including the Damariscotta River, makes the Maine Coast an ideal location to grow seagreens, according to Seth Barker, a founder and partner in the Walpole-based Maine Fresh Sea Farms. A variety of sea vegetables are grown in the waters of Clark's Cove including Alaria, Sugar Kelp, and Dulse.

    Comment?

  4. OSU helps create superfoodRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 2, 2016 | Portland Tribune

    Scientists and food innovators in Oregon have brought to market the nation's first commercially available product using dulse - a nutrient-rich sea vegetable grown at the Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. It's called Tamari with Dulse Seaweed Dressing & Marinade, and contains a strain of dulse that's farmed by continuously cycling fresh Pacific Ocean water through specially designed tanks at the marine science center.

    Comment?

  5. Bacon-tasting seaweed could be the next kaleRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 13, 2016 | The Oregonian

    The Oregonian/OregonLive's Molly Harbarger visits Oregon State University's Food Innovation Center to try dulse, marketed as a bacon-flavored superfood now made into a salad dressing, hitting New Seasons Market on Jan. 13. Dulse started as humble abalone feed, sold for $4 an ounce as a cooking ingredient and was mostly limited to the realms of fish and hippy food. But the seaweed held a secret: Treated the right way, it almost tastes like bacon.

    Comment?

  6. New Seasonsa Partnership with OSU Yields First Commercialized Oregon Seaweed ProductRead the original story

    Jan 12, 2016 | Business Wire

    The Dulse Seaweed Dressing & Marinade is a joint effort between New Seasons Market, Oregon State University and Dulse Foods. Tangy and versatile, the Asian-style dressing and marinade features a strain of nutrient-rich dulse sea vegetable grown at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, Ore., and is the result of extensive research and development based on consumer taste testing at the OSU Food Innovation Center.

    Comment?

  7. Move Over, Kale: Dulse Is The Superfood Of The FutureRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 11, 2016 | Fast Company

    At Imperial Restaurant in Portland, Oregon, diners are getting a taste of the latest superfood to hit the market: dulse, a crimson seaweed that's packed with nutrients and, when fried, offers up an umami flavor similar to bacon. "It disappears in your mouth," says chef and owner Vitaly Paley.

    Comment?

  8. Scientists seek to unravel secrets of 'truffle' seaweedRead the original story

    Nov 7, 2015 | Scotland on Sunday

    ... such as the season, the location and even the weather all seem to affect the flavour. "There is interest in Scottish dulse from high-end chefs and foodies. People are adding it to everything from scallops to eggs or using it in stock. You get great ...

    Comment?