Paleontology Newswire (Page 7)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Paleontology. (Page 7)

Results 121 - 140 of 36,899 in Paleontology

  1. Antibiotic resistance is a gut reactionRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Dec 16 | Science Daily

    Scientists have discovered how certain gut bacteria can protect themselves and others in the gut from antibiotics. The gut is home to hundreds of trillions of bacteria, which have important roles in maintaining our health.

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  2. Fossil hunter discovers 7ft ichthyosaur skeleton near Penarth beachRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Dec 19 | Penarth Times

    AN AMATEUR fossil hunter is hoping to have discovered a new species after unearthing a 7ft skeleton near Penarth beach Jonathan Bow, 34, discovered the ichthyosaur fossil of a carnivorous marine reptile while walking the shoreline in the Penarth area with his brother and two friends. He said he often looked for fossils around the area as it had a lot of fossils from the Jurassic age of 200million years ago.

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  3. Movie review: This a Museuma entry should be closed to the publicRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Dec 19 | Cape Cod Times

    The second, “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian,” also did well, though its profits didn't come near the heights of its predecessor. And so here we go again, with the same cast playing the same roles, but as in the second film, acting it out in a different location.

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  4. The 7ft fossil of a prehistoric fish lizard has been discovered on a South Wales beachRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Dec 19 | IcNetwork

    Amateur fossil hunter Jonathan Bow has unearthed a seven foot skeleton of a ichthyosaur carniverous marine reptile on Penarth beach. Experts believe the discovery by the 34 year-old clinical programmer from Porthcawl could be a "very, very important find."

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  5. Dinosaurs are soon coming back to life from the pages of your Medway...Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday Dec 19 | Kent Online

    You may not have wanted to rifle through an enormous mound of triceratop poo but few who saw Jurassic Park would have passed up joining Dr Ellie Sattler in stroking the poorly dino. Obviously, being extinct, it was always a pipedream.

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  6. Comet landing top breakthrough of 2014Read the original story

    Friday Dec 19 | Nerve News

    ... scientific achievements also includes ground-breaking advances in medicine, robotics, synthetic biology and paleontology, to name a few. Breakthroughs should do one of two things: Either solve a problem that people have been wrestling with for a ...

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  7. Christmas postcards were once the most popular way to send holiday greetingsRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Ogdensburg Courier-Observer/Journal

    Until mid-January, the Potsdam Public Museum will be showcasing 28 examples of an artful way to send holiday wishes - one which has gone the way of the dinosaur. Christmas postcards, which were popular around the turn of the 20th century and until the start of World War I, were sent locally and abroad as ways for both young and old to spread Christmas cheer.

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  8. Five things you never knew about Jurassic ParkRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | NEWS.com.au

    WHAT almost wiped out the cast and crew? And which unlikely animal provided the velociraptor's terrifying screams? Here's what you never knew about Jurassic Park. HOLLYWOOD'S hottest stars have hit the red carpet for the inaugural People Magazine Awards in Los Angeles.

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  9. 'Jurassic World' First Look: Chris Pratt rides with some raptorsRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch

    It's never an easy walk in Jurassic Park . In fact, guests typically end up running like hell.

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  10. Father-son bonding in solid "Night at the Museum" finaleRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Denver Post

    The past may be immortal, but not so the reanimating magic that turns New York's American Museum of Natural History into a dusk-to-dawn happy hour for dinosaurs and Neanderthals, explorers and conquerors, and a capuchin monkey with an overactive bladder. Such is the dilemma this motley crew faces in "Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb," a most enjoyable capper to director Shawn Levy and producer Chris Columbus' cheerfully silly and sneakily smart family-entertainment juggernaut.

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  11. Study on world's biggest animal finds more than one population in the southeastern PacificRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Science Daily

    Scientists are examining molecular clues to answer a big question: how many types of blue whales exist in the waters of the southeastern Pacific? A blue whale swimming through the waters of coastal southern Chile, the location of a feeding and nursing ground for the species. Using genetic information, scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Universidad Austral de Chile, the Blue Whale Center, the American Museum of Natural History , and NOAA are working to determine how many types of blue whale exist in the waters of the southeastern Pacific.

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  12. New, tighter timeline confirms ancient volcanism aligned with dinosaurs' extinctionRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Science Daily

    A definitive geological timeline shows that a series of massive volcanic explosions 66 million years ago played a role in the extinction event that claimed Earth's non-avian dinosaurs, and challenges the dominant theory that a meteorite impact was the sole cause of the extinction. A definitive geological timeline from Princeton University researchers shows that a series of massive eruptions 66 million years ago in a primeval volcanic range in western India known as the Deccan Traps played a role in the extinction event that claimed Earth's non-avian dinosaurs, and challenges the dominant theory that a meteorite impact was the sole cause of the extinction.

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  13. Time management skills keep animals primed for survivalRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Science Daily

    Many animals may have a previously under-appreciated ability to make up for lost time with more effort, according to new research. Many animals may have a previously under-appreciated ability to make up for lost time with more effort, according to new research publishing this week in PLOS Computational Biology .

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  14. Asteroid that wiped out dinosaurs may have nearly knocked off mammals, tooRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Dec 17 | Science Daily

    The classic story is that mammals rose to dominance after the dinosaurs went extinct, but a new study shows that some of the most common mammals living alongside dinosaurs, the metatherians, extinct relatives of living marsupials, were also nearly wiped out when an asteroid hit the planet 66 million years ago. This image shows a cast of the fossil remnants of Asiatherium reshetovi, one of the metatherian species that used to live on the planet millions of years ago.

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  15. Kitchen Table Kibitzing 12/18/2014: Do You Trim a Tree?Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Daily Kos

    It's been a few years since I last put up a tree at the winter holidays. I had been pretty committed to using a real tree.

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  16. New Jurassic World Image Has Chris Pratt Ridin' with Raptors;...Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Collider

    Yesterday, we got a new Jurassic World image of Chris Pratt hanging out with a raptor , which felt like a way of doubling down on one of the more controversial aspects of the first trailer -shouldn't raptors be scary? Isn't it cooler if they're wild and undomesticated? Of course, we don't know the context of this perceived friendship or how it will play out, so I'll give director Colin Trevorrow the benefit of the doubt, especially since a new image has been released that shows researcher Owen riding a motorcycle alongside his raptor pals. But perhaps they're not friends as much uneasy allies since this time there's a much bigger threat out in the park.

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  17. Comet rendezvous named "breakthrough of the year" by ScienceRead the original story

    Thursday Dec 18 | Xinhuanet

    The U.S. journal Science on Thursday chose the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission that soft-landed a spacecraft on a comet for the first time as the 2014 breakthrough of the year. Rosetta and its lander module, known as Philae, made headlines in November when Philae touched down on the surface of the speeding comet, known as 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

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  18. Watch: Dinosaurs arrive at Staten Island Zoo; a sneak peek at the new animatronics exhibitRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | SILive.com

    "Jurassic World," the latest installment of the "Jurassic Park" film franchise, isn't due out until June - but you don't have to wait for that summer blockbuster to score face-time with dinosaurs. Eight of the scaly prehistoric creatures are wintering at the Staten Island Zoo, where "Dinosaur Encounters" debuted Thursday, Dec. 18. A triceratops is among the four species that were welcomed for their four-month stay by about 60 preschoolers who walked over from the Broadway YMCA.

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  19. Trevorrow Talks "Jurassic World" Hybrid DinoRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 18 | Dark Horizons News

    Following that Chris Pratt photo earlier, "Jurassic World" director Colin Trevorrow has spoken with EW about the film and brought up the topic of the dinosaur talked about in the trailer - the genetically modified hybrid said to be a far more lethal variation on the Tyrannosaurus Rex: "There are dinosaurs and there's the other-there's this thing that is not one of them, that is not of them. There's a lot of bold new ideas in the movie and I'm pushing it as far forward as I can.

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  20. Montclair State Professor's Research Concludes That Birds Lost...Read the original story

    Thursday Dec 18 | PRWeb

    Robert Meredith, an assistant professor of biology and molecular biology at Montclair State University, is a lead author of "Evidence for Tooth Loss and the Acquisition of a Horny Beak in the Common Avian Ancestor," a report published in the December 12, 2014 issue of Science that concludes that the common ancestor of all living birds lost its teeth approximately 116 million years ago. Robert Meredith, an assistant professor of biology and molecular biology at Montclair State University has long wondered whether teeth were lost in the common ancestor of all living birds, or whether they were lost convergently in several independent bird lineages.

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