Paleontology Newswire (Page 4)

Paleontology Newswire (Page 4)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Paleontology. (Page 4)

Results 61 - 80 of 25,427 in Paleontology

  1. Human ancestor Lucy spent much of her time in trees: studyRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 1 | The Raw Story

    A representative model of the skeleton "Lucy" at the opening of the new permanent exhibition at the National Museum of Ethiopia on December 3, 2014 Lucy, the ancient ancestor of modern humans, probably spent at least a third of her day nesting in trees, according to new research unveiled Wednesday. Our 3.18 million-year-old relative, whose fossilized partial skeleton was discovered in Ethiopia in 1974, likely got around as much like a modern chimpanzee as a modern human, according to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE by scientists at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland and the University of Texas at Austin.

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  2. Travel Channel's Mysteries of the Museum to Investigate Mysteries of Dinosaurs, King Tut & MoreRead the original story

    Thursday Dec 1 | BroadwayWorld.com

    Tackling the story of the Titanic's epic sinking in frigid waters as part of Travel Channel's December Chillcation programming event isn't enough so, history EXPLORER Don Wildman will dig deep into the mysteries of Alcatraz, the White House, dinosaurs and KING TUT on special episodes of MYSTERIES OF THE MUSEUM, beginning Thursday, January 5 at 9:00 p.m. ET/PT. Wildman will examine the audacious escape from one of the world's most secure prisons, the now state-of-the-art command center capable of meeting the needs of the modern president, the planet's oldest and greatest archaeological mystery and the world's continued fascination of a boy king.

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  3. Death Valley's 'secret' fossil canyon could finally be opened to the publicRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 1 | Daily Mail

    A remote canyon in Death Valley has been kept shielded from the public for the past 76 years, to preserve a huge cache of fossilised animal tracks. Now palaeontologists, who refer to the secret canyon as 'The Barnyard', have called for the US National Park Service to open up the area to the public.

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  4. Ed Sheeran speaks out after Princess Beatrice 'sword prank' mishapRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 1 | Hampshire Chronicle

    Ed Sheeran joked about getting his face "cut open" as he showed off a scar on his cheek during his first official performance of 2016. "It's nice to be back.

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  5. THON Director Thursday: Meet Merchandise Director Will KochRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 1 | Onward State

    I desperately wanted the opportunity to give of myself wholly to THON. I never want to look back and believe that I could have done more as a THON student volunteer.

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  6. Defending the Commons: 40 Years of In These TimesRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Nov 27 | In These Times

    The lesson is clear: Absent pressure from the Left and from grassroots movements, politicians will fail to act on even the most existential of threats. The human species' impact on this planet has been the ecological equivalent of an asteroid hitting the Yucata n.

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  7. Human Ancestor 'Lucy' Walk and Climbed TreesRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 1 | I4U Future Technology News

    Evidence preserved in the internal skeletal structure of Lucy, a member of the ancient human species known as Australopithecus afarensis, suggests that she climbed trees, the study said. Since Lucy's discovery in Ethiopia 42 years ago, paleontologists have debated whether she spent her life walking on the ground or combined walking with frequent tree climbing.

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  8. Human ancestor Lucy 'spent much of her time in trees'Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 1 | Bangkok Post

    Lucy, the ancient ancestor of modern humans, probably spent at least a third of her day nesting in trees, according to new research unveiled on Wednesday. Lucy, the ancient ancestor of modern humans, likely moved around much like a modern chimpanzee than a modern human, according to a new study Our 3.18 million-year-old relative, whose fossilized partial skeleton was discovered in Ethiopia in 1974, likely moved around more like a modern chimpanzee than a modern human, according to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE by scientists at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland and the University of Texas at Austin.

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  9. Day Trip Discoveries: Rainy day? Take kids to a children's museumRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 1 | My Edmonds

    When you wonder what to do with house-bound kids or grandkids during winter's rainy months, take them to a children's museum. Everett, Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia each have a dedicated children's museum with creative exhibits and hands-on activities designed to encourage both play and learning.

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  10. Ed Sheeran's cutting comment after Beatrice 'sword prank' mishapRead the original story

    Thursday Dec 1 | Ballymoney and Moyle Times

    Ed Sheeran has joked about getting his face "cut open" as he showed off a scar on his cheek during his first official performance of 2016. "It's nice to be back.

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  11. Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery to undergo major overhaulRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Nov 30 | IcWalsall

    New displays, exhibitions and facilities will breathe life into building as trust aims to create something "fit for the 21st century" Birmingham's historic Museum and Art Gallery is set for a major overhaul and is asking for the city's backing as it draws up new plans for the future. New displays, exhibitions and facilities, as well as improved access, are all promised following an agreement between the city council and the Birmingham Museums Trust, after months of negotiations on a new long lease on the historic Chamberlain Square building.

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  12. Inside the Jurassic jungle using prehistoric power to educate future botanistsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Nov 30 | ABC News

    Alongside one of the busiest roads in far-north Queensland lies a densely packed jungle that looks like it could have been there for 65 million years. The Jurassica Project, led by Cairns landscape gardener Matt Mitchley, aims to promote nature and horticulture to young Australians by tapping into their fascination with all things prehistoric.

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  13. Ancient beasts roamed this secret spot in Death ValleyRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Nov 30 | The Recorder

    Paleontologists call it "The Barnyard," a remote box canyon in an inhospitable desert where slabs of mud stone as big as billboards are indented with fossil tracks left by mastodons, camels, horses and cats the size of leopards.

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  14. Dinosaurs created during Zachary library programRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Nov 30 | The Advocate

    Lilia Lawhon, 4, builds a museum of Legos during a program at the Zachary Branch Library. ADVOCATE STAFF PHOTO BY DARLENE DENSTORFF -- Zachary Branch Library children's librarian Michelle Camp helps Hamlin Hess, 4, pick out feet, a head and tail for his Lego dinosaur during a Nov. 22 library program.

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  15. Prince William Reveals Kate Middleton's Adorably Basic But Stress-Relieving HobbyRead the original story

    Wednesday Nov 30 | ETonline

    Prince William let that adorable tidbit slip while awarding the Order of the British Empire to adult coloring book illustrator Johanna Basford this week at Buckingham Palace. "Prince William actually said that his wife likes to color in The Secret Garden, which was really sweet," Basford told the Telegraph on Tuesday, referring to her first coloring book, which sold over 1 million copies and arguably started the adult coloring craze.

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  16. Remains of ancient elephant unearthed at L.A. subway excavation siteRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Nov 30 | The San Diego Union-Tribune

    The first discovery, made just before Thanksgiving, was of a 3-foot section of tusk fragments, as well as fragments of a mastodon tooth, found at a depth of 15 feet at the Wilshire and La Brea excavation site, said Metro spokesman Dave Sotero. Late afternoon Monday, a paleo-monitor hired to look out for bones and fossils came across a partial skull and tusks, believed to belong to an ancient elephant, Sotero said.

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  17. Human Ancestor Lucy Was a Tree Climber, New Evidence SuggestsRead the original story

    Wednesday Nov 30 | PressReleasePoint

    Evidence preserved in the internal skeletal structure of the world-famous fossil, Lucy, suggests the ancient human species frequently climbed trees, according to a new analysis by scientists from The Johns Hopkins University and The University of Texas at Austin. Since Lucy's discovery in Ethiopia 42 years ago this month by Arizona State University anthropologist Donald Johanson and graduate student Tom Gray, paleontologists have debated whether the 3.18 million-year-old specimen of Australopithecus afarensis - or southern ape of Afar - spent her life walking on the ground or combined walking with frequent tree climbing.

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  18. Pre-Human Lucy Climbed Trees, Scans ShowRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Nov 30 | MSNBC

    Researchers who say they showed the pre-human "Lucy" died falling from a tree now say they've shown she probably lived up there, or at least spent a lot of time in trees. Bone scans show "Lucy," who died 3.2 million years ago, had thick, strong upper arms compared to her thigh bones - the same pattern seen in chimpanzees as compared to modern humans or even later human ancestors.

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  19. How did baleen whale ancestors lose their teeth?Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Nov 30 | Christian Science Monitor

    ... teeth looked familiar to some of the scientists, says study co-author Erich Fitzgerald, curator of vertebrate paleontology at Australia's Museums Victoria. "That kind of wear is only seen in a couple of living marine mammal species," Dr. Fitzgerald ...

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  20. Australopithecus Afarensis: 'Lucy' Was A Tree Climber?Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Nov 30 | Scientific Blogging

    Lucy was discovered in Ethiopia 42 years ago this month and paleontologists have debated whether the 3.18 million-year-old specimen spent her life walking on the ground or combined walking with frequent tree climbing. A new analysis of the partially fossilized skeleton published shows that Lucy's upper limbs were heavily built, similar to tree-climbing chimpanzees, supporting the idea that she often used her arms to pull herself up, most likely onto tree branches.

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