Geology Newswire (Page 12)

Geology Newswire (Page 12)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Geology. (Page 12)

Results 221 - 240 of 87,132 in Geology

  1. Saltwater intrusion commission expects to have twice as much to spend in 2016-17 budgetRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | The Advocate

    The commission charged with addressing saltwater intrusion issues in Baton Rouge area ground water used for drinking and industry will consider on Tuesday approving its 2016-17 budget that is almost twice what it was last year. The increase in revenue collected by the Capital Area Ground Water Conservation Commission comes from a pumpage fee increase commissioners approved last fall from $5 per million gallons used by regulated users to $10 per million gallons.

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  2. Beijing finds fresh 'fire ice' reserves in South China SeaRead the original story

    Sunday Jun 26 | Crofs Blogs

    A new reserve of "combustible ice" has been identified in the South China Sea near the Pearl River mouth basin in what may be a significant step forward in developing the highly-pure fuel as a potential new energy source. The China Geological Survey made the latest discovery in deep ocean beds in the area, the Guangzhou Daily reported on Sunday.

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  3. After 2015, Rohtang tunnel project likely to miss 2019 deadline tooRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | The Indian Express

    ... which stopped all work on the tunnel to fix the problem, and once even considered changing the alignment. "Himalayan geology is highly unpredictable. Every day there is a new challenge and we have to find a solution there and then. Now we are ...

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  4. Dino fossils dug upRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | Castanet.net

    ... to staff, the museum has invited volunteers out to the field, including a father-son team, trained scientists and geology hobbyists. Fedak said working with the delicate fossils can be "therapeutic" and he hopes to expand the volunteer program in ...

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  5. M6.3 temblor hits remote part of Kyrgyzstan; no word on casualties, damageRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | The Japan Times

    A strong earthquake has hit southern Kyrgyzstan, but emergency officials say there are no immediate reports of any damage or injuries in the remote corner of the Central Asian nation. The emergency situations ministry says the earthquake that struck at 5:17 p.m. on Sunday had a magnitude of 6.7 at its center and registered a magnitude of 4 in Osh, the nearest city.

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  6. Strong earthquake hits Kyrgyzstan, no injuries reportedRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | Newsday

    A strong earthquake has hit southern Kyrgyzstan, but emergency officials say there are no immediate reports of any damage or injuries in the remote corner of the Central Asian nation. The emergency situations ministry says the earthquake that struck at 5:17 p.m. on Sunday had a magnitude of 6.7 at its center and registered a magnitude of 4 in Osh, the nearest city.

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  7. Researchers dig up fossils from the dawn of the dinosaurs along the Bay of FundyRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | Maple Ridge Pitt Meadows Times

    ... to staff, the museum has invited volunteers out to the field, including a father-son team, trained scientists and geology hobbyists. Fedak said working with the delicate fossils can be "therapeutic" and he hopes to expand the volunteer program in ...

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  8. 6.3-magnitude earthquake hits Central Asian KyrgyzstanRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | Channelnewsasia.com

    There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties after the earthquake hit at a depth of 18 kilometres just after 1115 GMT. MOSCOW: A 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan on Sunday , the United States Geological Survey said.

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  9. Watch 5 moonsets over ZimbabweRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | Earth & Sky

    Moonset at 5 different points on the horizon, at 5 different moon phases, from a June 6, 2016 young moon to the June 20 full moon Zimbabwe's winter solstice. During this month there were many clear night skies with good visibility which enabled time-lapse sequences of the moon setting at five different points on the local horizon to be captured for five phases of the moon, from the waxing crescent moon on June 6, 2016 to the full moon at the winter solstice on June 20. A total of 159 still images were taken using a tripod-mounted Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ60 compact camera in manual exposure mode and x 60 magnification.

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  10. RIL knew about KG-D6, ONGC block connectivity: NikoRead the original story

    Sunday Jun 26 | Mydigitalfc.com

    ... to discover wells in Block KG-DWN-98/3, with no modelling but rather with a reliance on D&M's general experience in geology," it said. It went on to state that seismic data may suggest continuity of channels across block boundaries, but is entirely ...

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  11. Gateshead sinkhole: What is a sinkhole? All you need to know about the holes appearing on our roadsRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | Chronicle Live

    ... Highways England to assist with traffic management. We put some questions to Dr Jean Hall, lecturer in engineering geology at Newcastle University, and here are her answers. Sinkholes are the result of a collapse of the surface material into a void ...

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  12. Rotting trees linked to mysterious sand dune holesRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | HeraldNet

    Mysterious holes that forced the closure of a massive dune at an Indiana national park after a 6-year-old boy fell into one and nearly died were caused by sand-covered trees that left cavities behind as they decayed over the years, researchers have found. Fungi on the covered trees formed a sort of cement that allowed the sand to keep its hollowed out shape as the wood decayed and collapsed inward, leaving holes more than 10 feet deep in the dune known as Mount Baldy at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, according to a study published in December by Erin Argyilan, who heads Indiana University Northwest's department of geosciences.

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  13. News Briefs: Tsunami readiness program set this Tuesday in Port Angeles . . . and other itemsRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jun 26 | Peninsula Daily News

    The state Emergency Management Division and Clallam County Sheriff's Office will offer a free Tsunami Ready Community education program Tuesday. The presentation for members of the public and business community will be from 12:30 p.m. until 2 p.m. in City Council chambers at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. The program will include information about the science of earthquakes and tsunamis, preparedness tools and community response program options.

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  14. An even bigger beast?Read the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Jun 25 | The Grand Junction Sentinel

    USGS scientists drill a test core into the Mancos shale in Delta, to aid in the assessment for oil and gas resources. Photo by Joshua Hicks, USGS The USGS Core Research Center collaborated with the USGS Energy Resources Program to drill a core from the Mancos shale in Delta to aid in the oil and gas assessment.

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  15. Industry: Shale report increases stakes for a BLM lease reviewRead the original story

    Saturday Jun 25 | The Grand Junction Sentinel

    The energy industry says a new report highlighting the huge potential for Piceance Basin shale gas development ups the stakes as the Bureau of Land Management considers whether to cancel or modify up to 65 leases in the White River National Forest. The U.S. Geological Survey earlier this month estimated that the Mancos shale in the northwest Colorado basin contains 66 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas.

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  16. USGS finds data fraud, closes environmental chemistry labRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Jun 25 | NorCalBlogs

    Alleged misconduct and data manipulation at a U.S. Geological Survey laboratory may have affected thousands of environmental quality measurements processed between 2008 and 2014, according to the Interior Department's Office of Inspector General . As many as 24 research projects, representing some $108 million in funding for the laboratory, may have been impacted, OIG said earlier this month.

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  17. Loess Hills region earns coveted wine country designationRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Jun 25 | KCRG

    The Daily Nonpareil reports that could one day be the case after the region that runs along Iowa's western border with Nebraska was recently certified as an American Viticultural Area. Doug Grave, president of the Western Iowa Grape Growers association and co-owner of Bodega Victoriana Winery near Glenwood, said the association undertook a five-year, $50,000 effort to get the designation.

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  18. State seismic network helps tell fracking quakes from natural onesRead the original story

    Saturday Jun 25 | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    Tools of modern earthquake science were arranged at the bottom of a 4-foot-deep hole: a Rubbermaid Brute garbage can, a stubby pedestal of fresh concrete and an olive-green cylindrical sensor about the size of a can of beans. Up on the ledge, in a clearing behind the office at Keystone State Park in Derry Township earlier this month, Kyle Homman peered at an app on his iPod and hopped.

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  19. Study: Rotting trees caused mysterious holes in huge Indiana dunesRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Jun 25 | St. Augustine Record

    In this Aug. 14, 2014 file photo, a researcher uses large equipment to study Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore's Mount Baldy in Michigan City, Ind. Mysterious holes that forced the closure of a massive dune at an Indiana national park after a 6-year-old boy fell into one and nearly died were caused by sand-covered trees that left cavities behind as they decayed over the years, researchers have found.

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  20. Geologists have been trying to solve the mystery of the 'worldwide hum' for decadesRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Jun 25 | Silicon Alley Insider

    In the spring of 2012, when I was living near the coastal village of Sechelt, on British Columbia's picturesque Sunshine Coast, I began hearing a humming sound, which I thought were float planes. My first clue that something unusual was happening came with the realization that the sound didn't fade away, like plane noises typically do.

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