Entomology Newswire (Page 7)

Entomology Newswire (Page 7)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Entomology. (Page 7)

Results 121 - 140 of 81,817 in Entomology

  1. UC Davis Bohart Museum features a Insects and UaRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | The Daily Democrat

    When the Bohart Museum of Entomology at UC Davis hosts an open house, “Insects and U” on Sunday afternoon for the public to get acquainted with insects, it will also be a time to get acquainted with entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the butterfly and moth collection. Smith will show attendees how to pin butterflies during the three-hour open house.

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  2. Yoda and Beyonce: DEA reveals drug nicknamesRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Daily Mail

    Yoda, Beyonce and Walking Zombie are just some of the surprising names that the Drug Enforcement Agency has identified as slang for many narcotics. And worryingly, some of the drugs - that may look similar but have drastically different effects - have very similar street names.

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  3. Southeast Urban Wood Exchange Connects Urban Forestry ProfessionalsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | WoodDigest.com

    The Southeast Urban Wood Exchange continues to enroll a growing number of forest and wood product professionals who share the goal of putting urban tree removals to their highest possible use. UrbanWoodExchange.org is a new clearinghouse for businesses ranging from professional tree care and removal services through sawyers, kiln dryers and lumber suppliers to connect and grow local urban wood networks.

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  4. 'Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs, and Hope on the Urban Frontier'Read the original story

    Wednesday | Real Change

    You might flip through this attractive volume in a bookstore. It has lots of colorful, glossy photos of beaming people of varying ethnicities tending lettuce and holding huge bunches of brilliant beets.

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  5. O'Meara: Tidy up perennial beds or leave plants standing during winter?Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Daily Camera

    ... in Boulder County at 303-678-6238 to receive an application. Carol O'Meara is the extension agent in horticulture entomology for Colorado State University's Extension in Boulder County. Contact her at [email protected] . Tuesday morning's ...

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  6. N.Y.C. Nature: The True Blue Asiatic DayflowerRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | The New York Times

    Just as the first cool hints of autumn displace summer's sultry haze, Asiatic dayflowers' blooms reach their peak, scattering flecks of sky blue into the corners of garden plots and local parks. As the name suggests, each bloom only lasts a day, but each plant produces many flowers, so a wet season means weeks of dayflowers.

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  7. Higher minimum wages means less sanitary restaurantsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Illinoisreview

    "The study , conducted by economics professors from Indiana University, Ball State University, and Villanova University, found each dollar increase in the minimum wage resulted in a 6.4% increase in overall health violations, with a 7.3% increase in critical'red'violations and a 15.3% increase in less severe'blue'violations in the city's restaurants. "'Red'violations are high risk factors that could lead to dangerous food borne illness, such as contamination by hands, cross contamination among food items, improper handling of chemicals used in food preparation and noncompliance with approved procedures.

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  8. Metro Parks: Sept. 21-28Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | This Week Community News

    Bison, 1 p.m. Sept. 23 at the Nature Center. Guests will take a 1-mile hike to see North America's largest land mammal.

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  9. She was bullied for liking bugs. Now shea s co-authored a scientific paper about them.Read the original story

    Wednesday | Tri-cityherald.com

    ... she can contact my lab anytime! We are happy to send her papers, nets, whatever will keep her entomology passion going! I would like to send her a signed copy of my book. I love beetles so much I'm writing 3 books about them. #BugsR4Girls 7 insect ...

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  10. UF Scientist Recognized for Research in Mosquito-Borne Disease ControlRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Newswise

    GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- University of Florida entomology professor Jeffrey Bloomquist is known to have a restless curiosity about everything, ranging from insecticide toxicology to mosquito control and resistance.

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  11. Breaking Legume's Crop Wild Relative BarrierRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Newswise

    On one hand, selecting specific desirable traits, such as high yields, can increase crop productivity. But other important traits, like resistance to pests, can be lost.

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  12. WSU researchers see popular herbicide affecting health across generationsRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | EurekAlert!

    First, the good news. Washington State University researchers have found that a rat exposed to a popular herbicide while in the womb developed no diseases and showed no apparent health effects aside from lower weight.

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  13. Plants combine color and fragrance to procure pollinatorsRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | EurekAlert!

    This is true for many of the 41 insect-pollinated plant species growing in a Phrygana scrubland habitat on the Greek island of Lesbos. An international research team published their findings Sept.

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  14. Fly away home? Ice age may have clipped bird migrationRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Robert Zink has authored a new study suggesting that the last ice age completely halted the northerly migrations of some bird species from about 21,000 to... view The onset of the last ice age may have forced some bird species to abandon their northerly migrations for thousands of years, says new research led by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln ornithologist. Published Sept.

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  15. Flood of painted lady butterflies enrich Boulder County's late summer paletteRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Sep 19 | ReporterHerald.com

    It's not uncommon that Boulder County would see a seasonal migration of butterflies known as painted ladies.

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  16. Southern Quebec visited by 'unprecedented' number of painted lady butterfliesRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Sep 19 | CTV

    The millions of black-and-orange butterflies that have carpeted flower beds across the Montreal area in recent days are waiting for winds to carry them south to warmer weather, according to an expert at the Montreal Insectarium. Southern Quebec has become host to an "unprecedented" number of painted lady butterflies in the last ten days, said Max Larrivee, the museum's head of research and collections.

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  17. Emerging Disease Further Jeopardizes North American FrogsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Science Blog

    Frogs and salamanders are currently among the most threatened groups of animals on the planet. The two most common frog diseases, chytridiomycosis and ranavirus infection, are linked to frog population declines worldwide.

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  18. September 2017 FSA NewsletterRead the original story

    Wednesday | Lincoln Daily News

    November 20, 2017 - bi-annual and perennial crops, such as apples, asparagus, blueberries, caneberries, cherries, grapes, hops, nectarines, pecans, peaches, pears, plums, and strawberries.

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  19. Hummingbirds in WentworthRead the original story

    Wednesday | Amherst Daily News

    Ruby-throated hummingbirds spend their winters down south in Florida or further south and fly up to eastern Canada to spend their summers. Fortunately, hummingbirds were welcome in Wentworth this summer, while other birds were not welcome as authorities said a disease was being carried to other bird feeders and we should not put out seed for birds.

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  20. Ants - The Real Masters Of Our PlanetRead the original story

    Wednesday | Times-Union

    According to a recent news report, fire ants were among the creepiest images to emerge from the flood in Houston caused by Hurricane Harvey. Instinctively, they rose up from their underground tunnel systems and literally stuck together to survive by linking their six claws and clinging to one another in massive rafts and balls that floated and spun in the current.

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