Archaeology Newswire (Page 5)

Archaeology Newswire (Page 5)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Archaeology. (Page 5)

Results 81 - 100 of 28,048 in Archaeology

  1. Where Did Soccer Start? Archaeology Weighs In.Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jun 15 | National Geographic

    Long before basketball and soccer, ancient Maya were hitting the park to play rounds of Mesoamerican ball game. Today, in Hidalgo, Mexico, a group of athletes are determined to bring back the ancient ball game and honor the traditions of their ancestors.

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  2. Tobacco Use in North America Pushed Back 1,500 YearsRead the original story

    Friday Jun 15 | Archaeology

    ... abama who conducted excavations before the area was submerged by the damming of the Tennessee River. For more on archaeology in the region, go to " Letter from Florida: People of the White Earth ."

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  3. Major milestone reached as A 150 million Bridgwater Gateway launchesRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jun 15 | Bridgwater Mercury

    ... " The launch of Bridgwater Gateway also featured a display called 'Bronze Age Bridgwater', featuring prehistoric archaeology discovered at the site during a four month archaeological excavation undertaken before construction work commenced.

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  4. 1,000-year-old ancient amulet discovered in Jerusalem's City of DavidRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jun 15 | Fox News

    The clay artifact, which dates back to the 9th or 10th century, was uncovered during the excavation of a parking lot at the City of David archaeological site. The tiny amulet, which is only 1 centimeter in size, features a two-line inscription in Arabic, which is either a blessing or a personal prayer.

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  5. True origin of ancient turquoiseRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | Science Daily

    New research overturns more than a century of claims that the source of turquoise used and revered by ancient civilizations in Mexico, such as the Aztecs, came from the Southwestern US Geochemical analyses show the origin of the turquoise is Mesoamerica . This is a close up view of Mixteca-style mask decorated with turquoise mosaic from the collections of the Smithsonian Institution-National Museum of the American Indian.

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  6. Charleston's Ghost Island has a haunted past but could have a different futureRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jun 15 | Post and Courier

    The new owner of a historic hummock island off the Ashley River understands why people are curious about what he's up to - the island once held a mausoleum of a prominent Charleston family - but says he intends to keep it as a quiet family retreat. Dr. Christopher Swain of Charleston bought the small island, mostly known as "Ghost Island" but also called "Tomb Island" - for $130,000 two years ago.

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  7. Using Ramadan as Cover, 1,000 Waqf Workers a Cleareda Soil Rich with Evidence of Jewish TempleRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jun 15 | The Jewish Press

    The Jerusalem Islamic Waqf took advantage of the final days of the holy month of Ramadan, when Jews were barred from visiting the Temple Mount, to eliminate from the compound piles of earth that were rich with archaeological treasures dating back to the Temple period, Makor Rishon reported Friday. The piles of earth were created initially by illegal renovations the Waqf carried out in 1999.

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  8. 17 incredible images of the haunting Mayan ruins in the Riviera MayaRead the original story

    Friday Jun 15 | MSN Living

    Tourists and archaeologists alike travel to the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico to view the region's famous Mayan ruins. In fact, the ancient sites are so well-known that there's a tourism district named for them: the Riviera Maya.

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  9. New footage emerges of ancient mass child sacrifice site in PeruRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jun 15 | ABC News

    New footage and pictures have emerged of over 100 child skeletons from a mass human sacrifice in northern Peru that is believed to date back some 1,000 years. The excavations at the site in Trujillo have been ongoing for months but researchers on Thursday confirmed a total of 109 sets of child remains had been uncovered - making it the largest site in the world for child sacrifice remains.

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  10. Forgotten no more: Shell Oil preserves slave cemeteriesRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | The Honolulu Advertiser

    The Bruslie Cemetery, a burial ground for slaves in New Orleans on March 28. The Shell Oil Company has spruced up, marked and blocked off tracts of its land in the Convent community west of New Orleans where archaeologists confirmed the presence of slave burial grounds in 2013. CONVENT, La.>> A major oil company is taking steps to honor once-forgotten slaves buried on its land west of New Orleans in an area where sugar plantations once abounded, an effort that some hope will grow into a larger movement to recognize and protect such cemeteries around the country.

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  11. Monterey County archaeologist and lecturer Gary Breschini diesRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | Monterey County Herald

    Salinas >> Local archaeologist, lecturer and author Dr. Gary Breschini died last week of complications due to cancer. He would have been 72 on June 27. A Salinas native, Mr. Breschini was a historian and expert on the local area's Native American people and lands.

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  12. Space archaeologist wins massive $1 million TED PrizeRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 11, 2015 | Bay Area Business Woman

    ... University of Alabama at Birmingham's Laboratory for Global Observation has pioneered the field of "satellite archaeology," using global imaging to catch looters in the act and stop them from destroying ancient artifacts. Parcak has been working on ...

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  13. Why the world premiere of precious biblical artifacts is in quiet OklahomaRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | The Times of Israel

    Through August 19, a select few in the middle of America's vast Bible Belt can see rare First Temple objects -- that most may only ever see online Isaiah bulla, a 2,700-year-old clay seal impression which may have belonged to the biblical prophet Isaiah. A seal impression of King Hezekiah unearthed in the Ophel excavations at the foot of the southern wall of the Temple Mount, conducted by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute of Archaeology A student from Armstrong College holds a coin discovered at the Ophel archaeological dig outside the walls of Jerusalem's Old City, where a hoard of rare bronze coins from the Jewish Revolt was recently discovered, dating to circa 66-70CE. 1 comment

  14. Forgotten no more: Shell Oil preserves slave cemeteries newRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | WTOP-FM Washington

    A major oil company is taking steps to honor once-forgotten slaves buried on its land west of New Orleans in an area where sugar plantations once abounded, an effort that some hope will grow into a larger movement to recognize and protect such cemeteries around the country. The Shell Oil Company marked, blocked off and spruced up the tracts near its Convent refinery west of New Orleans and held dedication ceremonies in March, about five years after archaeologists confirmed the presence of slave burial grounds in 2013.

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  15. Remains of possible Iron Age settlement found in CaithnessRead the original story

    Thursday Jun 14 | Scotsman.com

    ... made at the first ever excavation of the Thusater Burn site. The dig which was led by Orkney Research Centre for Archaeology (ORCA) and the University of Highlands and Islands following promising results from an earlier ground survey. Around 40 ...

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  16. Possible Prehistoric Settlement Found in Northern ScotlandRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | Archaeology

    BBC News reports that a prehistoric site, including a hearth made of stone slabs, a hammer stone, rubble, and tools, has been found in the Scottish Highlands. The possible building may have been part of a larger settlement, according to Pete Higgins of the Orkney Research Centre for Archaeology.

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  17. Turquoise May Have Been Mined in MesoamericaRead the original story

    Thursday Jun 14 | Archaeology

    ... ay have been no organized contact between Mesoamericans and people living in the American Southwest. For more on archaeology in Mesoamerica, go to " Circle of Life ."

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  18. Forgotten Stockholm whalebone pieces reveal hidden information about Viking whalingRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | The Local

    Large-scale whaling may have taken place in Scandinavia many centuries earlier than previously thought, according to new findings from archaeologists in Sweden and York. Studies of whalebone board game pieces dating back to the Iron Age suggest that intensive whaling began around the middle of the sixth century CE, according to the study published in the European Journal of Archaeology .

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  19. New study rethinks pre-Columbian turquoise tradeRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | Ars Technica

    New chemical analysis of Aztec turquoise artifacts suggests the stone didn't come from the Southwestern US as archaeologists have long thought, which raises questions about the scale of long-distance trade between the Aztecs and their northern neighbors. For thousands of years, societies from Central America to the Southwestern US have prized turquoise for its unique blue-green color.

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  20. Pop-up exhibition showcases Anglo-Saxon cemetery finds - including...Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jun 14 | Ely Standard

    Ely Museum held a pop-up exhibition with Oxford Archaeology on Saturday showcasing finds from a recent excavation in the city. Staff and volunteers at the museum said they "had a great day" when they welcomed members of the public through the doors to view the Anglo-Saxon discoveries.

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