Archaeology Newswire (Page 11)

Archaeology Newswire (Page 11)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Archaeology. (Page 11)

Results 201 - 220 of 45,985 in Archaeology

  1. 11 of Our Best Weekend ReadsRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Feb 10 | The New York Times

    The thrill of victory and the agony of getting out of bed. Welcome to the weekend.

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  2. China's Terracotta Army figures go on display in UK museum, serve as goodwill ambassadorsRead the original story

    Friday Feb 9 | Xinhuanet

    China's Terracotta Army marched to Britain as Liverpool's long-awaited Terracotta Warriors exhibition opened on Friday. Objects from one of the world's greatest archaeological discoveries attracted hundreds of visitors on the first day.

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  3. Human Sacrifice in the YucatanRead the original story

    Friday Feb 9 | Dissident Voice

    One of the world's great civilizations, the Maya, flourished in southern Mexico and parts of Central America for more than three thousand years. From about 2000 BC until the Spanish Conquest in the 16th century AD, various Mayan centers rose in their far-flung territories in Mexico's YucatA n Peninsula, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

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  4. The buckle was unearthed during a dig near Stirling Castle Pic: Guard ArchaeologyRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Sunday Herald

    ... attached, while the town's jail was also used by the military. Bob Will, Senior Project Manager with Guard Archaeology, said: "The military buckle is from the Austrian army and has the double headed imperial eagle and the Austrian coat of arms and ...

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  5. EdithRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | The Day

    ... Gipstein said of his mom, often with her husband, Edward, at medical conventions. "She loved ruins. She was an archaeology major in college and collected painting and prints of ruins all over the world." She loved it all - Japanese, Chinese, ...

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  6. Mexico's pyramid cities an archeological adventureRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | The Chronicle Herald

    Stone-carved jaguars flank a staircase at the Chichen-Itza ruins in Yucatan, Mexico, in 2016. Stone-carved jaguars flank a staircase at the Chichen-Itza ruins in Yucatan, Mexico, in 2016.

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  7. Where is Survival of the Fittest filmed?Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Radio Times

    Oh yes, it's an outdoor bathroom. There are also daybeds where they can chill out or sleep if they fancy a night under the stars, or can't stand the snoring in the dorms.

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  8. Humans Cared for Sick Puppies Long Ago, Ancient Burial ShowsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Live Science

    ... 28 weeks old when it died, the study's lead researcher, Luc Janssens, a veterinarian and doctoral student of archaeology at Leiden University in the Netherlands, said in a statement . A dental analysis showed that the pup likely contracted the ...

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  9. Humans better at visual arts than Neanderthals. why?Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Dear Kitty

    Did our early ancestors produce art ? Or do modern humans only think they did? In this episode of the CARTA series Evolutionary Origins of Art and Aesthetics, join renowned scientists Jean-Jacques Hublin and Randall White in an exploration of the notions of creativity and aesthetics as seen in Neanderthal and Paleolithic cultures. Series: CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny [6/2009] Visual imagery used in drawing regulates arm movements in manner similar to how hunters visualize the arc of a spear.

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  10. Rare Roman mosaic, featuring toga-wearing figures, discovered in IsraelRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Fox News

    Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered a rare multicolored Roman mosaic featuring three toga-wearing figures during excavations in the ancient city of Caesarea. The mosaic, which dates back to the 2nd or 3rd-century A.D, measures around 11.5 feet by 26 feet.

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  11. Early Neolithic Enclosure Found in EnglandRead the original story

    Friday Feb 9 | Archaeology

    The Guardian reports that a section of a 5,500-year-old causewayed enclosure, complete with encircling ditches and boundaries with gap entrances, has been uncovered at a quarry in southeast England. Wessex Archaeology researchers expect to find the rest of the oval-shaped monument intact.

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  12. Historian discovers Rogue Indian Wars hospital recordsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | The Ashland Daily Tidings

    On Sept. 9, while he was poking through George Law Curry's 1860 correspondence as Oregon territorial governor, he found something that didn't quite belong in the slim folders.

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  13. Evidence of Beer-Making Found in Epic Ancient Egyptian RuinsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Men's Journal

    ... and artifacts in them suggest they were devoted to wheat-focused activities like making bread and beer. Egyptian archaeology Professor Nadine Moeller, who co-led the expedition, was very stoked about the findings and noted that there aren't any sets ...

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  14. Southeast Anthropologist to Discuss Research on Archaeological Sites...Read the original story

    Friday Feb 9 | PressReleasePoint

    ... dynamic perspective on life within this unique community." Bengtson's research focuses on the intersection of archaeology and biological anthropology. She is interested in inter-and intra-community variation in experiences of gender and childhood in ...

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  15. Archeological findings offer glimpse into Halifax's early daysRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | The Chronicle Herald

    ... Glen, senior archaeologist at Davis MacIntyre and Associates Limited, speaking at a meeting of the Nova Scotia Archaeology Society. Legislation had been passed that shut down any graveyards operating in the downtown core, with the exception of the ...

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  16. Peru devises new rules for Machu Picchu crowdsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Star Tribune

    The Incan citadel of Machu Picchu in Peru. The Inca city is believed to have been built in the 15th century and consists of imposing stone buildings arranged around a central plaza.

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  17. An Iron Age FRIDGE has been discovered on Isle of LewisRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Daily Mail

    The 20-foot long Iron Age chamber, thought to be used around 350BC, was discovered during construction work for a new house being built in Ness on the Isle of Lewis. Experts believe it could have been used for storage, such as dairy and meat products, or for wood used for heating.

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  18. NGO: Planned deforestation works destroy famous Dacian site in RomaniaRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Romania-Insider.com

    Agent Green, a local NGO focused on protecting Romania's forests, and Dacica Foundation say that the planned tree cutting at the Dacian fortress Sarmizegetusa Regia in central Romania is seriously and irreversibly affecting the archaeological site. The site was closed to the public on January 22 for deforestation, but images captured with the help of a drone show huge trees that have been cut and collapsed over the walls of the former Dacian capital, the NGO said in a press release.

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  19. Riddles in time and spaceRead the original story

    Friday Feb 9 | PressReleasePoint

    ... human history of the Shahrizor valley during and prior to its mysterious dark age. The Institute of near Eastern Archaeology at LMU will host the "11th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE)" on 3-7 April 2018. ...

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  20. 5500-year-old Neolithic monument found near Windsor castleRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Feb 9 | Mail on Sunday

    ... near Datchet because they believe they can uncover the entire circuit of the enclosure. Specialists from Wessex Archaeology, based in Salisbury, Wiltshire, say the rare find could help scientists to better understand some of Britain's earliest ...

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