Anthropology Newswire (Page 6)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Anthropology. (Page 6)

Results 101 - 120 of 37,172 in Anthropology

  1. Egypt says restoration of oldest pyramid on trackRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | Newsday

    Egypt's antiquities minister took journalists inside a 4,600-year-old pyramid on Tuesday to reject recent accusations of mismanagement at the site as false and "without evidence." At a press conference at the Saqqara pyramid complex, some 30 kilometers south of Cairo, Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh el-Damaty decried recent media reports alleging that the Djoser pyramid might collapse.

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  2. Egypt says restoration of oldest pyramid on trackRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | Newsday

    Egypt's antiquities minister took journalists inside a 4,600-year-old pyramid on Tuesday to reject recent accusations of mismanagement at the site as false and "without evidence." At a press conference at the Saqqara pyramid complex, some 30 kilometers south of Cairo, Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh el-Damaty decried recent media reports alleging that the Djoser pyramid... SAQQARA, Egypt - -- Egypt's antiquities minister took journalists inside a 4,600-year-old pyramid on Tuesday to reject recent accusations of mismanagement at the site as false and "without evidence."

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  3. Like a Rolling Stone, fossil named after Mick JaggerWeiran Wendy...Read the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | The Chronicle

    A team led by Gregg Gunnell, director of the Division of Fossil Primates at the Duke Lemur Center, and Ellen Miller, associate professor of physical anthropology at Wake Forest University, recently unearthed the fossils of an extinct African creature with highly distinguishable lips. Part of a family of hoofed animals called anathracores, the animal earned the name Jaggermeryxnaida after Rolling Stones frontman Sir Mick Jagger-long noted for his own distinct lips.

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  4. Belize Maya Cave Named a National Geographic Top Sacred SpotRead the original story w/Photo

    20 hrs ago | PRWeb

    Belize's Actun Tunichil Muknal cave has topped a "Sacred Places of a Lifetime" list compiled by National Geographic, bolstering Belize's reputation as one of the world's best cultural tourism destinations, according to the Lodge at Chaa Creek. National Geographic has placed Belize's Actun Tunichil Muknal cave at the top of a new list of "Sacred Places of a Lifetime," bolstering the little country's reputation as one of the world's best cultural tourism destinations, according to a Lodge at Chaa Creek naturalist guide.

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  5. Aerial photos from drone might help to find a Revolutionary War prison campRead the original story w/Photo

    20 hrs ago | The York Daily Record

    Jeff Mummert of New Cumberland prepares for takeoff with his drone to take aerial photos at the Camp Security dig site in Springettsbury Township. Mummert, a history teacher, has been using the drone for less than a year.

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  6. With new deep sea diving suit, divers sure of new finds from 'ancient computer' shipwreckRead the original story

    20 hrs ago | Art Daily

    Theotokis Theodoulou, an archaeologist of the Greek ministry of Culture, wears a revolutionary new deep sea diving suit to explore the ancient shipwreck where one of the most remarkable scientific objects of antiquity was found. The so-called Antikythera Mechanism, a 2nd-century BC device known as the world's oldest computer, was discovered by sponge divers in 1900 off a remote Greek island in the Aegean.

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  7. Modern Forensics Provides Clues to Death of Richard IIIRead the original story w/Photo

    21 hrs ago | HON

    Modern forensic techniques are shedding light on a 500-year-old mystery: Which battlefield injuries might have killed King Richard III, the last English monarch to die in battle? A new analysis of the king's skeletal remains, using whole-body CT scans and micro-CT imaging of injured bones, provides a detailed account of the 11 injuries he suffered at the Battle of Bosworth Field, where he died on Aug. 22, 1485. The modern forensics revealed that two skull injuries could have killed the king in a short amount of time, according to a new report published Sept.

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  8. What Caused King Richard III's Death 529 Years Ago? Modern Science Weighs InRead the original story w/Photo

    22 hrs ago | Forbes.com

    I am an emergency physician on staff at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, where I have practiced for the past 10 years. I also serve as an adviser to Medscape Emergency Medicine, an educational portal for physicians, and an affiliate of WebMD.

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  9. 'Salish Bounty: Traditional Native American Foods of Puget Sound' opens Oct. 25Read the original story w/Photo

    22 hrs ago | North Kitsap Herald

    The Suquamish Museum presents a new exhibit from the Burke Museum, "Salish Bounty: Traditional Native American Foods of Puget Sound," Oct. 25 to Dec. 31. Focusing on the revival of traditional Native foods, "Salish Bounty" is co-curated by Burke Museum archaeologists and Coast Salish advisers. "Salish Bounty"- comprised of historic photo images, map, and informative text printed on free-standing banners - reminds the viewer that food isn't solitary; cooking and eating are things we do with other people and express our cultural history and values.

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  10. Mauritius call for Tharu artistesRead the original story

    22 hrs ago | The Telegraph

    Eleven artistes belonging to the Tharu community would showcase their dance skills in Mauritius during the six-day international Bhojpuri conference from October 30. The artistes would stage the traditional Jhamta dance on November 3. An exhibition on Tharu civilisation and culture would also be organised in Mauritius, said the art, culture and youth affairs minister, Vinay Bihari. The art and culture ministry of Mauritius had sent an invitation to the state government, requesting participation of Bihari artistes in the Bhojpuri conference.

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  11. Scientists: Here's what killed Richard IIIRead the original story w/Photo

    23 hrs ago | CNN

    British scientists announced on February 4 that they were convinced "beyond reasonable doubt" that a skeleton found during an archaeological dig in Leicester, England, in August 2012 is that of King Richard III, who was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. Mitochondrial DNA extracted from the bones was matched to Michael Ibsen, a Canadian cabinetmaker and direct descendant of Richard III's sister, Anne of York.

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  12. Museums Enter the Brave New Digital WorldRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | Wall Street Journal

    No need to crane your neck to examine Marc Chagall's ceiling at the Opera Garnier in Paris anymore-Google has digitized it. In 1964, Marc Chagall completed a remarkable painting, in Paris's Palais Garnier, depicting scenes from operas by composers ranging from Modest Mussorgsky to Mozart.

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  13. Shipwreck that gave up ancient 'computer' revisitedRead the original story

    Tuesday | Door Reminder

    Shipwreck that gave up ancient 'computer' revisited Divers in spacesuit-like "Exosuits" seek more pieces of 2,000-year-old calculator. Check out this story on greenbaypressgazette.com: http://usat.ly/1s51olN Areconstruction of the Antikythera Mechanism, a 2nd-century BC device known as the world's oldest computer, is displayed at the Archaeological Museum in Athens on Sunday.

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  14. Found Anthropological Artifacts from a Summer Beach Culture of LeisureRead the original story

    Tuesday | Perfect Duluth Day

    What strange, rock-skipping culture of leisure inhabits these Duluthian shorelines in the Lake Superior summers? This is a brief survey of structures and artifacts discovered in my anthropological investigations of 2013-2014.

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  15. Clothing Styles (Photos): Street Prophets Coffee HourRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | Daily Kos

    Welcome to the Tuesday edition of the Coffee Hour at Street Prophets. This is an open thread where we can discuss what's happening in our lives, what we've been working on, and our opinions on current events.

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  16. Five Thousand-Year-Old Monument Unearthed in IsraelRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | The Escapist

    Archaeologists previously thought the structure was part of a city wall, but recent work indicates there is no city beside it and that the structure is a stand alone monument. An Israeli researcher by the name of Ido Wachtel discovered a crescent-shaped monument estimated to be 5,000-years old.

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  17. Pulque Detected in Pottery from TeotihuacanRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | Archaeology

    Scientists ground up more than 300 pottery sherds from Mexico's ancient city of Teotihuacan, then scanned the resulting powder for traces of food or drink that the unglazed ceramic might have absorbed. In particular, they looked for the alcohol-making bacterium Zymomonas mobilis , which is necessary for the creation of pulque, a milky drink made from the sap of the agave plant.

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  18. Bog Body Uncovered in Ireland's County MeathRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | Archaeology

    Utility workers discovered the lower leg bones of an adult in Rossan Bog. "The exact date of the remains is not known at this time but we will be conducting research in the coming months," archaeologist Maeve Sikora of the National Museum of Ireland told The Irish Examiner .

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  19. Survey of Gallipoli Battlefield ContinuesRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday | Archaeology

    Archaeologists from Turkey, Australia, and New Zealand are wrapping up a five-year project to survey the World War I battlefield site on the Gallipoli Peninsula. For eight months, Turkish soldiers of the Ottoman Empire and the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps engaged in trench warfare.

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  20. Review Awe-inspiring artefacts, misleading premise: Exhibition Ming:...Read the original story

    Tuesday | Hispanic Business

    They knew it was a mighty empire of stupendous wealth. The Venetian merchant went there and wrote about its wonders in the 13th century.

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