Anthropology Newswire (Page 4)

Anthropology Newswire (Page 4)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Anthropology. (Page 4)

Results 61 - 80 of 34,266 in Anthropology

  1. Australia's oldest human technology emerges from 65,000 hidden yearsRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | The Age

    Skip to navigation Skip to content Skip to footer View text version of this page Help using this website - Accessibility statement Join today and you can easily save your favourite articles, join in the conversation and comment, plus select which news your want direct to your inbox. Join today and you can easily save your favourite articles, join in the conversation and comment, plus select which news your want direct to your inbox.

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  2. Humans reached Australia 65,000 years ago: StudyRead the original story

    Yesterday | Nerve News

    Canberra, July 20 - The first settlers of Australia reached the continent 65,000 years ago, about 15,000 years earlier than experts previously thought, a new archaeological study revealed on Thursday. The archaeologists made the conclusion following an excavation at the Madjedbebe rock shelter near Kakadu National Park in northern Australia, one of the most important archaeological sites in the region known for its early rock paintings, reports Efe news.

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  3. Digging a passion for arrowhead hunting, collectingRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | The Bandera County Courier

    Anyone who has the passion or is interested in arrowheads or artifacts knows the thrill of finding a great artifact. Some who have the deep-rooted drive are collectors - amateur or professional - and we share a love for this sport.

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  4. At Smithsonian archaeology lab, citizen scientists work to unearth environmental historyRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | The Baltimore Sun

    At a lab inside the 2,650-acre Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, bones are stacked on shelves, centuries-old clay smoking pipes are reassembled and imported shells once used to make buttons are stashed in a drawer. Outside the lab Wednesday, a half-dozen citizen scientists worked in the sweltering heat to uncover more artifacts and information.

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  5. Unmarked graves pervade Anne Arundel, Prince George'sRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | The Baltimore Sun

    When Mike Maloney discovered unmarked headstones outside Sacred Heart Cemetery in Bowie earlier this year, he knew he had to make some calls. One was to Elm Street Development, which has a contract to buy land surrounding Sacred Heart Church with an interest in re-zoning and developing it.

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  6. Everything Worth Knowing About ... Ancient DNARead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 19, 2017 | Bad Astronomy Blog

    In 1984, geneticists recovered 229 base pairs of genetic code from a quagga, a subspecies of zebra extinct since the late 1800s. The achievement proved DNA could survive in dead things and spurred a new field of science: paleogenetics.

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  7. Marac terrain rich in artefactsRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | Trinadad Express

    It was like walking on broken wares, literally. Though the hills were deeply carpeted in a litter of leaves, pieces of pottery both large and small densely protruded above the surface in what seemed to be miles upon miles of remnants of the occupation of a people's way of life long past.

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  8. Tourist chiefs unveil '25 objects which define Scotland'Read the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | Sunday Herald

    IT is the ugly ancestor of the beautiful game which and may have once been kicked around by Mary Queen of Scots. Now the world's oldest football has joined a Roman distance slab, Antarctic goggles, the Lewis Chessmen and other items in a list of objects tourism chiefs believe have shaped Scotland 's history.

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  9. Archaeology South-East uncover 200-year old burial site at Brighton DomeRead the original story

    Yesterday | Art Daily

    The human remains, which have now been exhumed and will be analysed to determine more about the deceased, are thought to be from a Quaker burial ground that existed before the Royal Pavilion Estate was built. Photo: Brighton Dome/Carlotta Luke.

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  10. Why Aussie discovery is so significantRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | NEWS.com.au

    A NEW discovery in Australia with global significance has ignited the world's imagination about what life was really like 65,000 years ago. THE discovery of globally significant artefacts in Australia has ignited the world's imagination about what life was like 65,000 years ago.

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  11. King Tut's wife found in newly discovered tombRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | NEWS.com.au

    SCIENTISTS claim a burial tomb found in the Valley of The Kings, which is filled with 3,300-year-old secrets, might contain the King Tut's lover. MUCH is known about the boy king Tut, but the life of his wife - and perhaps his half-sister - Ankesenamun largely remains a mystery.

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  12. Australia's earliest home: UOW team resets Kakadu clockRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | Narooma News

    A team of archaeologists and dating specialists has new proof Aboriginal people have been in Australia for at least 65,000 years - much longer than the 47,000 years believed by some. The team said discoveries included the oldest ground-edge stone axe technology in the world and the oldest known seed grinding tools in Australia.

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  13. Has Tutankhamun's wife finally been found?Read the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | The New Zealand Herald

    On the go and no time to finish that story right now? Your News is the place for you to save content to read later from any device. Register with us and content you save will appear here so you can access them to read later.

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  14. Annapolis Royal mayor trying to keep local artifacts in the provinceRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | The Chronicle Herald

    Annapolis Royal Mayor Bill MacDonald stands in a climate-controlled building in Dartmouth amid hundreds of boxes and containers filled with archaeological objects from Parks Canada sites across the Atlantic provinces. Annapolis Royal Mayor Bill MacDonald stands in a climate-controlled building in Dartmouth amid hundreds of boxes and containers filled with archaeological objects from Parks Canada sites across the Atlantic provinces.

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  15. Tomb of King Tutankhamun's wife's likely discovered, archaeologists sayRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | The Raw Story

    History buffs may have a reason to rejoice after a team of archeologists found evidence of a tomb, which they believe to be that of King Tutankhamun's wife Ankhesenamun.

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  16. To hug, or not to hug?Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Newsday

    ... than a quarter of workers felt they were hugged inappropriately. Deborah Wallsmith, an assistant professor of anthropology at Kennesaw State University, Georgia, says that the gradations of hug discomfort depend upon nuances, relationships, and ...

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  17. Archaeologists Just Discovered a 4,000-Year-Old Emoji in TurkeyRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | The New York Observer

    Sometimes new ideas aren't really all that new. Take for instance the smiley face.

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  18. Aboriginal people in Australia for at least 65,000 years: UOW researchersRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Illawarra Mercury

    A new discovery of more than 10,000 artefacts has a team of archaeologists convinced Aboriginal people have been in Australia for at least 65,000 years. A new discovery of more than 10,000 artefacts has a team of archaeologists convinced Aboriginal people have been in Australia for at least 65,000 years.

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  19. Human history revisited on Aborigine findRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | The Mercury

    A team of archaeologists have uncovered a treasure trove of evidence confirming the colonisation of Australia at least 65,000 years ago, earlier than estimates of between 47,000 and 60,000 years. It was made at the Madjedbebe rock shelter in the Northern Territory on the traditional lands of the Mirarr people surrounded by the World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park.

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  20. Aboriginal archaeological discovery in Kakadu rewrites the history of AustraliaRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Sydney Morning Herald

    Jabiru, Northern Territory: Aboriginal people have lived in Australia for a minimum of 65,000 years, a team of archaeologists has established - 18,000 years longer than had been proved previously and at least 5000 years longer than had been speculated by the most optimistic researchers. The world-first finding, which follows years of archaeological digging in an ancient camp-site beneath a sandstone rock shelter within the Jabiru mining lease in Kakadu, Northern Territory, drastically alters the known history of the trek out of Africa by modern humans, according to the leader of the international team of archaeologists, associate professor Chris Clarkson of the University of Queensland.

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