Anthropology Newswire (Page 12)

Anthropology Newswire (Page 12)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Anthropology. (Page 12)

Results 221 - 240 of 147,867 in Anthropology

  1. Anthropologies #22: Some thoughts on food, animals, and anthropologyRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Savage Minds

    Here it is: the long-awaited first installment of the anthropologies issue on food. We kick off the issue with a short essay by James Babbitt, who is a graduate student in cultural anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis.

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  2. 7 intriguing ancient cultures history almost forgotRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Alltop

    Greeks, Egyptians, and Mayans are ancient civilizations taught in every textbook, yet they were far from the only examples of highly organized societies from long ago. LiveScience fills in a few more of the blanks with other cultures history almost forgot, complete with tantalizing clues to their lifestyles archaeologists are still piecing together.

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  3. Anthropology: Abandon All Truth Ye Who EnterRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | The Daily Caller

    ... which neglects the cultures and agency of people around the globe. This intellectual revolution has infected anthropology (among many fields) with a dangerous, self-contradictory nihilism that rejects the possibility of objective Truth toward which ...

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  4. Travel Management Plan a work in progressRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Williams

    These are some of the unfortunate results of off-road vehicle use on the Kaibab National Forest , according to Jerry Parker, law enforcement officer with the Forest Service. "I don't think most people are being irresponsible, I think they just don't know," Parker said regarding the rules and regulations of off-road vehicle use on the Kaibab.

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  5. Solving the Mesopotamia Timeline Puzzle with Tree-Rings and Radiocarbon ResearchRead the original story

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Newswise

    Tree-ring dating and radiocarbon research led by Cornell University archaeologist Sturt Manning has established an absolute timeline for the archaeological, historical and environmental record in Mesopotamia from the early second millennium B.C. Manning, the Goldwin Smith Professor of Classical Archaeology and director of the Cornell Tree-Ring Laboratory, resolved how to more accurately date the rich archaeological and textual record across 500 years of ancient Near Eastern history - the time of such famous figures as Hammurabi of Babylon. For several decades, scholars have debated discrepancies in chronological schemes for this period that were up to 150 years or more apart.

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  6. Ancient Korean-Style Tools Found in JapanRead the original story

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Archaeology

    According to the Asahi Shimbun , archaeologists excavating a sixth-century A.D. tomb on the island of Kyushu have discovered iron blacksmith tools decorated with silver inlay, which strongly suggests they were influenced by Korean styles of the time. The artifacts, which appear to be a chisel and and a pair of bow tongs, were X-rayed and discovered to have waving inlaid silver patterns similar to those found on Korean swords that date to the same period.

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  7. Historical society accepting Hands on History applicationsRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | The Advertiser News (North)

    Registrations are now being accepted for Hands-On History, the Vernon's Township Historical Society's very popular summer program for children entering grades two to four in September. The program is from Aug. 15-18 from 9:30 a.m. to noon.

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  8. Iron Age Burials Unearthed in EnglandRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Archaeology

    Archaeologists digging at a massive Late Iron Age settlement in southeastern England have unearthed nine skeletons, reports BBC News . The remains were found buried in oval pits and some of the graves were furnished with meat and ceramic vessels.

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  9. Caribbean Cave Walls Hold Evidence of Religious ExchangeRead the original story

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Archaeology

    Archaeologists have discovered evidence deep in a Caribbean cave that complicates the popular image of early European colonizers as unbending religious hardliners, according to a report in The Guardian . Walls in the cave, on uninhabited Mona Island, feature indigenous spiritual iconography alongside sixteenth-century European religious markings, including Christograms, abbreviations for Jesus Christ, and Latin sentences.

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  10. Washington Post Reviews "Whirling Debut Novel" by Prof. Lili WrightRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | WGRE-FM Greencastle

    "Shuffling quietly through the cool halls of any great museum, patrons have little sense of the moral quagmire that lies behind such collections," writes Ron Charles in the Washington Post . "And who can blame them? Everything about the way invaluable artifacts are displayed -- so immaculate in their glass cases -- isolates these objects from the violence of acquisition.

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  11. Trump's Magical Appeal: A Dated Anthropologist Offers CluesRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Religion Dispatched

    There's a new cottage industry devoted to explanations of the quasi-mystical appeal of Donald Trump. Is he a prosperity gospel preacher ? A Platonic tyrant ? Or is he a truth-telling jester ? At the Los Angeles Times , Peter Manseau recently tried to bring some critical theory to this exercise, arguing that Trump's appeal is best explained through the French sociologist A This kind of analysis can seem abstract.

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  12. Summer of fun for the family at heritage parkRead the original story

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Bedford Today

    Congratulations, you're now registered! Let us know what news and updates you want to hear about and we'll send them straight to your inbox. A series of spectacular summer events are being held at Wrest Park in Silsoe during the summer to keep the whole family entertained.

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  13. Cave Creek Museum Prepares for New SeasonRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Sonoran News

    While closed for the summer, Cave Creek Museum is bustling with activity as volunteers prepare for its 47th season of showcasing an extensive collection of prehistoric and historic artifacts that describe the lives of Native Americans, miners, ranchers and pioneers.

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  14. Cave Discoveries Shed New Light on Native and European Religious Encounters in the AmericasRead the original story

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Newswise

    A project led by archaeologists from the British Museum and the University of Leicester has discovered remarkable evidence which shows how the first generations of Europeans to arrive in the Americas engaged with indigenous peoples and their spiritual beliefs deep inside the caves of a remote Caribbean island. Recent fieldwork by a collaborative Anglo-Puerto Rican* team has uncovered new evidence in the Caribbean of an early religious dialogue between Europeans and Native Americans.

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  15. Book Review: Privateers of the RevolutionRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Marine News

    Privateers of the Revolution: War on the New Jersey Coast 1775-1783 is the revelatory narrative of the 538 Pennsylvania and New Jersey privateers, privately owned ships of war some called pirates. Manned by over 18,000 men, these privateers influenced the fight for American independence.

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  16. China strives to become leader in world of archeologyRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | USA Today

    China strives to become leader in world of archeology Cultural outreach helps soften Beijing's image abroad as an economic and military power. Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/2a7Eus1 Chinese archaeologists work inside the newly discovered tomb of Shangguan Wan'er, a 7th-century female politician who was one of the most powerful women in ancient Chinese history, near an airport in Xianyang, northwest China's Shaanxi province on Sept.

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  17. Dartmouth study with aye-ayes and slow loris finds that prosimians prefer alcoholRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jul 18 | EurekAlert!

    ... decaying tree trunks. "Aye-ayes are essentially primate woodpeckers" said Nathaniel J. Dominy , a professor of anthropology and biological sciences at Dartmouth. "So it is puzzling that they can digest alcohol so efficiently" he added. In the wet ...

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  18. 'Britain's Pompeii' provides exquisite Bronze Age artifactsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jul 15 | RedOrbit

    A Bronze Age village that had existed for just a few months before it burned down provided archaeologists with such "exquisite" detail it is being referred to as The Must Farm site in Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire was only around for a short time, according to an analysis of wood used to build the settlement. But evidence of fabric-making, varied diets and huge trading networks that went on during its short life has excited experts during a 10-month dig.

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  19. Smart Travel: LimaRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Mydigitalfc.com

    Apparently, food is the biggest reason why you should visit Peruvian capital of Lima. But edgy art and sublime pottery are also on offer if you are more of a culture-vulture than a foodie... What to see: Museo Larco: In an 18th-century viceroy's mansion, this museum offers one of the largest, best-presented displays of ceramics in Lima.

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  20. Are We Oversharing? Join the Discussion at Changing Hands PhoenixRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Phoenix New Times

    ... coach for the Republic's monthly Arizona Storytellers series. She's a storyteller, but her background is in anthropology. Her thoughts on online sharing? "My first instinct as an anthropologist is, 'How does this work for us?'" she says. "Clearly, ...

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