Epidemiology Newswire (Page 6)

Epidemiology Newswire (Page 6)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Epidemiology. (Page 6)

Results 101 - 120 of 8,090 in Epidemiology

  1. School-aged girl diagnosed with rare life-threatening hantavirus...Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jul 21 | Daily Mail

    The school-aged child had contact with rodent-infested buildings, according to a statement issued by the state's Department of Health on Wednesday. State epidemiologist Jill Baber says people should be mindful of the 'presence or evidence' of rodents when cleaning, especially in rural areas.

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  2. Baby teeth contain clues about early exposure to toxinsRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jul 21 | Denver Post

    Baby teeth may soon be worth a lot more than the sentimental value they offer nostalgic parents. It turns out that these teeth store a unique type of health record, with the potential to reveal everything that an individual has been exposed to, including environmental toxins such as lead and pesticides, and stress hormones produced by the baby in utero.

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  3. Child in northeast North Dakota diagnosed with rare, potentially deadly hantavirusRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jul 21 | Fox News

    Health officials in North Dakota say a child in the northeast part of the state has been hospitalized with the rare and potentially deadly hantavirus disease. The viral infection causes severe lung disease.

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  4. baskinRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jul 21 | WTEN-TV Albany

    "That's why we only have one person working now, because it's really that slow," Baskin-Robbins employee Erika Espiritu said. On July 12, the Hawaii State Department of Health announced that anyone who ate at Baskin-Robbins at Waikele Center between June 17 and July 3, 2016 , may have been exposed to hepatitis A. "The toughest part is having to take in all the harassment because I worked the - I might tear up - I worked the next morning and people would call and say mean stuff, and you just have to take it in, because you can't control what people think," Espiritu said.

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  5. Screenings may help oldies ward off cervical cancerRead the original story

    Thursday Jul 21 | Newkerala.com

    Washington D.C, Jul 21 : Pap smear screenings may sound terrifying, but it turns out, the brief discomfort of lying back and baring all for a stranger can actually be worth a life. A new study from the University of Illinois confirmed a link between Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. However, most American health guidelines discourage women in that age range from receiving screenings unless they have pre-existing risk factors.

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  6. Mobile app to help HIV-infected menRead the original story

    Thursday Jul 21 | Newkerala.com

    New York, July 21 : Researchers have developed a smartphone app that can help HIV-infected men stay in their treatment course by answering questions that often arise in the minds of patients undergoing such treatment. The app called Battery Health has an icon of a battery with a lightning bolt to disguise its purpose, ScienceMag reported.

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  7. Pap tests may be beneficial for preventing cervical cancer in older womenRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 20 | Medical News

    A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. However, most American health guidelines discourage women in that age range from receiving screenings unless they have pre-existing risk factors. "Some studies report that Pap smears are unnecessary in older age, while others show that there is a benefit in the over-65 age group," said Karin Rosenblatt, a cancer epidemiologist and a professor of kinesiology and community health at Illinois.

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  8. Researching Complimentary Therapies for childbirth.Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 20 | ABC News

    There has probably never been a safer time as a woman to give birth to a baby, yet the process of birth is possibly less well understood by individual women who are about to give birth. While we women sometimes tell the terrors of a difficult birth, count stitches, compare hours spent in labour, are we ever able to share techniques or positives that will make a 'normal' birth possible for other women we know? It was a rather terrifying dilemma that faced Epidemiologist from the University of Western Sydney Dr Kate Levett and led to a research project into complimentary therapies and their role in the birth process.

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  9. Nationa s first locally transmitted Zika case may be in Miami-DadeRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 20 | The Miami Herald

    The Zika virus is primarily transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes aegypti, pictured here, and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. Florida health officials are investigating the state's first possible case of local transmission of Zika.

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  10. Child in northeast North Dakota diagnosed with hantavirusRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 20 | Valley Morning Star

    Health officials in North Dakota say a child in the northeast part of the state has been hospitalized with the rare and potentially deadly hantavirus disease.

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  11. Russia Loves Science When It Comes To Cheating In Sports, But Not In FoodRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 20 | Scientific Blogging

    Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin recently signed Federal Law 358-FZ , which bans genetic engineering of plants and animals for the indefinite future. It's not like Russia has been taken over by Greenpeace and suddenly hates science, they were just accused of "a shocking and unprecedented attack on the integrity of sport and on the Olympic Games" after a report showed they operated a state-sponsored doping program during the 2014 Sochi Winter Games.

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  12. Trump taps Latino lawmaker from Kentucky to deliver - hopeful' message to HispanicsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 20 | Fox News

    The 46-year-old doctor of internal medicine became the first Hispanic to ever be elected to the Kentucky General Assembly in 2014. On Wednesday night, he will join Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz as the only Latinos to speak at the GOP convention.

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  13. Pap screenings may help prevent cervical cancer in elderly womenRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | EurekAlert!

    A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. However, most American health guidelines discourage women in that age range from receiving screenings unless they have pre-existing risk factors. "Some studies report that Pap smears are unnecessary in older age, while others show that there is a benefit in the over-65 age group," said Karin Rosenblatt , a cancer epidemiologist and a professor of kinesiology and community health at Illinois.

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  14. More Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 20 | WZVN-TV Fort Myers

    Authorities reported Tuesday that epidemiologists were investigating a non-travel related case of the Zika virus in Miami-Dade County. The Florida Department of Health and The Centers for Disease Control were working together. As of Tuesday afternoon, there were 326 cases in Florida.

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  15. DHHS: No action for PFCs in bloodRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 20 | Nashua Telegraph

    The Department of Health and Human Services met with residents Tuesday over the process for blood testing in search of perfluorinated chemicals - or PFCs - when state officials explained how they find the chemicals, but could not offer advice on what to do about it. Residents of several southern New Hampshire towns affected by PFC contamination of private water supplies have been advised they could, as of July 14, qualify for blood testing for the chemicals if they lived near enough to or used contaminated wells.

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  16. Early HIV vaccine results 'lead to major trial'Read the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | New Vision

    Promising results from an early safety trial with a potential HIV vaccine have paved the way for a major new study, researchers announced at the International AIDS Conference in Durban on Tuesday. An 18-month trial with a candidate vaccine dubbed HVTN100 drew on 252 participants at six sites in South Africa, one of the countries hardest-hit by an epidemic that has claimed more than 30 million lives worldwide since the 1980s.

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  17. Syphilis cases spike in Broward, Miami-DadeRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | South Florida Sun-Sentinel

    The number of syphilis cases is spiking in Florida, with Broward and Miami-Dade counties far outpacing the state in percentages of those diagnosed with the sexually transmitted disease. Broward's syphilis numbers have increased nearly eightfold since 1996, with 16.25 of every 100,000 people now affected, according to the state's health department.

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  18. IVF Does Not Raise Breast Cancer Risk, Study ShowsRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Boston.com

    After all, the treatment requires temporarily increasing levels of certain sex hormones to five or 10 times the normal. Two of those hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can affect the course of certain kinds of breast cancer.

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  19. Miami may have Floridaa s first locally acquired case of Zika virusRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | The Miami Herald

    Florida health officials are investigating a Zika infection in Miami-Dade County that may be the first acquired within the state, according to an announcement late Tuesday. Health officials reported they are conducting an epidemiological investigation in collaboration with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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  20. Huge IVF study may reassure women who feared increased risk of breast cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 19 | Tri-cityherald.com

    After all, the treatment requires temporarily increasing levels of certain sex hormones to five or 10 times the normal. Two of those hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can affect the course of certain kinds of breast cancer.

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