Epidemiology Newswire (Page 2)

Epidemiology Newswire (Page 2)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Epidemiology. (Page 2)

Results 21 - 40 of 5,158 in Epidemiology

  1. Flu season coming to a close - finallySeason caused 3 times as many...Read the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 20 | Norwalk Reflector

    The Huron County Public Health said that the flu activity has dropped "significantly" over the past month. Flu Week 16 had no hospitalizations due to the flu, same as Week 14. Week 15 had one.

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  2. First hay fever map of UK shows pollen hotspotsRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 20 | This Is London

    The new, highly-detailed maps of the UK contain the location of key plants and trees known to produce pollen that triggers allergies and asthma. The maps, produced at the University of Exeter in collaboration with the Met Office , may help acute hay fever or asthma sufferers decide where to live or which areas to avoid at peak times when pollen is released.

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  3. Flu season coming to a close - finallySeason caused 3 times as many...Read the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 20 | Norwalk Reflector

    The Huron County Public Health said that the flu activity has dropped "significantly" over the past month. Flu Week 16 had no hospitalizations due to the flu, same as Week 14. Week 15 had one.

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  4. The detailed maps reveal the locations of allergy triggering plants and trees across the countryRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 20 | Cambridge Evening News

    The first ever hay fever map of Britain has been released to help sufferers avoid the pollen hotspots across the country. Produced by the University of Exeter's Medical School, in collaboration with the Met Office, the maps could help hay fever sufferers in choosing where to live or to avoid peak pollen times in certain areas.

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  5. Article ImageRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 20 | This Is Grimsby

    POLLEN levels in Grimsby have been revealed like never before thanks to a revolutionary 'hay fever map of Britain' developed by scientists. The new map - the first of its kind - will bring joy to sufferers who struggle to find relief from runny noses, sneezing and itchy eyes.

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  6. Single mosquito bite might be enough to transmit multiple viruses, study findsRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday May 20 | KWLM-AM Willmar

    Mosquito bites aren't just a nuisance but can be a serious public health threat as seen during the mosquito-borne Zika outbreak that spread through much of the globe last year. A new study published Friday in the Nature Communications journal reports that mosquitoes might be even more adept at spreading disease than previously thought.

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  7. One bite is all it takes for Zika mosquito to transmit dengueRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | Newkerala.com

    A new study led by Colorado State University researchers found that Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito that carries Zika virus, might also transmit chikungunya and dengue viruses with one bite. The findings shed new light on what's known as a coinfection, which scientists said is not yet fully understood and may be fairly common in areas experiencing outbreaks.

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  8. Hay fever map of Britain could bring relief to allergy sufferersRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | ITV

    Scientists at the University of Exeter have developed a new, highly-detailed map of the UK containing the location of key plants and trees known to produce pollen that causes allergies and asthma. The maps, produced in collaboration with the Met Office, may help acute hay fever or asthma sufferers manage their symptoms.

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  9. The UK's pollution and pollen hotspots revealedRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | Daily Mail

    Hay fever map of Britain: Revealed, the UK's pollution and pollen hotspots - and what it is that's making you sneeze That's because the heavily-populated region is one of the worst places to be if you're allergic to pollen. The first hay fever maps of Britain reveal the South East has the most problem plants, with hazel the most widespread, while Surrey is a birch hotspot.

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  10. 1 in 5 U.S. cancers is 'rare'Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | MSN Healthy Living

    Rare cancers account for one in five cancers diagnosed in the United States, presenting special challenges to doctors and patients, a new study shows. "Continued efforts are needed to develop interventions for prevention, early detection, and treatment to reduce the burden of rare cancers," said researchers led by Carol DeSantis, an epidemiologist with the American Cancer Society.

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  11. Hay fever map of Britain published to help sufferers avoid hotspotsRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday May 18 | EurekAlert!

    A hay fever map of Britain - with the first ever guide to the location of plants in the UK that can trigger the allergy - has been produced to help sufferers cope, and warn them which 'hotspots' to avoid. Academics at the University of Exeter's Medical School have produced new, highly-detailed maps of the UK containing the location of key plants and trees known to produce pollen that triggers allergies and asthma.

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  12. The Summer Tick Forecast & New Ways to Fight Lyme DiseaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | New Hampshire Public Radio -

    We get the latest on N.H. tick populations, health precautions, and research. 2017 is predicted to be a banner year for ticks - meaning more risk for all of us, from Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.

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  13. Tick tipsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | The Martha's Vineyard Times

    As we all know, Martha's Vineyard has a tick problem, and it's not going away anytime soon. In fact, it's possible it's getting worse, according to Sam Telford, an epidemiologist who studies tick-borne illnesses in Massachusetts.

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  14. Will Trump's Expanded Policy Against Abortion Harm HIV/AIDS Relief?Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | The Atlantic

    Earlier this week, the Trump administration moved forward with plans to withhold global-health funding for organizations that "perform or actively promote abortion" abroad. This move revives an older policy that restricted funds for family-planning organizations-groups that focus on things like contraception and maternal health-and goes further to apply to all global-health funding.

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  15. Mosquitoes That Spread Zika Virus Could Simultaneously Transmit Other VirusesRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | Infection Control Today

    Researchers at Colorado State University infected mosquitoes in the lab with multiple kinds of viruses to learn more about the transmission of more than one infection from a single mosquito. Courtesy of John Eisele/CSU Photography A new study led by Colorado State University researchers found that Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito that carries Zika virus, might also transmit chikungunya and dengue viruses with one bite.

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  16. Health Officials Are Warning This Tick Season Could Be the Worst YetRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | Time

    "This year, there are worse ticks than many of us have ever seen in our lives," says Janet Foley, an epidemiologist at the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Ticks are roaming American forests in greater numbers this year than any in recent memory leaving thousands of humans at risk for lyme disease, say public health officials.

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  17. Study findings shed new light on coinfection with chikungunya, dengue or Zika virusesRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 19 | Medical News

    A new study led by Colorado State University researchers found that Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito that carries Zika virus, might also transmit chikungunya and dengue viruses with one bite. The findings shed new light on what's known as a coinfection, which scientists said is not yet fully understood and may be fairly common in areas experiencing outbreaks.

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  18. Leading animal specialists meet to discuss deadly diseaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday May 18 | Get Reading

    Leading veterinary specialists gathered in Reading last week to formulate a plan to deal with the deadly dog disease, Alabama Rot . The first ever conference to discuss research into the flesh-eating disease was held at the Madejski Stadium on Wednesday, May 10 as a result of the increasing number of cases in the UK.

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  19. Preakness notes: Multiplier trainer Walsh hopes it's last out, first inRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday May 18 | The Baltimore Sun

    Todd Pletcher, the trainer of Always Dreaming, the 2017 Kentucky Derby winner, talks about the No. 4 post position draw for the Preakness Stakes.

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  20. A new resource that could change community and public health:...Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday May 18 | PhysOrg Weblog

    After celebrating its 50th anniversary in May 2016, the Rochester Epidemiology Project team is not stopping to rest. Instead, they are marking the beginning of the next 50 years with the launch of a tool that could change community and public health in the region.

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