Environmental Law Newswire

Environmental Law Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Environmental Law.

Results 1 - 20 of 12,283 in Environmental Law

  1. Dunmore Borough Councill undecided on sewer authority dealRead the original story

    Monday Feb 8 | The Times-Tribune

    Though borough council has warmed to the idea of selling the Scranton Sewer Authority, members remained undecided Monday about whether to support the proposed $195 million deal with Pennsylvania American Water. As recently as March, council members were unanimously against the idea of selling the sewer system, which the borough jointly owns with Scranton.

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  2. NBC10 Investigators: Montco Safety ViolationsRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | NBC Philadelphia

    A group of neighbors in Montgomery County claimed their water was making them sick and nothing was being done to fix it, so they went to the NBC10 Investigators. NBC10's Mitch Blacher reports.

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  3. Logging operation concern at Narooma scenic spot | PhotosRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | Narooma News

    LOGGING CONCERN: Wagonga Scenic Drive resident Bill Braines is concerned with the current logging operation underway and its impact on a tourism attraction. LOGGING CONCERN: Wagonga Scenic Drive resident Bill Braines is concerned with the current logging operation underway and its impact on a tourism attraction.

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  4. After 15 years, cleanup plan approved for contaminated townRead the original story

    Monday Feb 8 | The Madison Press

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency granted final approval Monday to a costly cleanup program for a Montana community where health officials say hundreds of people have been killed by asbestos poisoning. The agency's action comes more than 15 years after it started emergency cleanup work in Libby following media reports that revealed rampant, asbestos-caused illnesses in the small town near the Idaho border.

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  5. Many cities at risk of lead in drinking waterRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | The Miami Herald

    Workers move pallets holding bottled water at a distribution site in Sebring, Ohio, Feb. 2, 2016. Water contamination has turned up in scores of communities in recent years, and experts cite holes in the safety net of rules and procedures.

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  6. After 15 years, cleanup plan OKed for Libby, Mont.Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Billings, Mont. a The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency granted final approval Monday to a costly cleanup program for a Montana community where health officials say hundreds of people have been killed by asbestos poisoning.

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  7. Whately to test filters to remove chemical from drinking waterRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | The Recorder

    The town's water commissioners have decided to test filters from two companies to determine how well they can remove manganese from the town's water supply.

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  8. Yet Another Study Finds Fracking Isn't Poisoning WaterRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | The Daily Caller

    A WPX Energy natural gas drilling rig north of Parachute, Colorado, December 9, 2014. The economy of Parachute, with a current population of approximately 1000 people, was devastated when thousands of workers lost their jobs on "Black Sunday" in 1982, after Exxon terminated the Colony Shale Oil Project.

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  9. What the New Adverse Modification Rule Doesn't DoRead the original story

    Monday Feb 8 | Environmental Law Prof Blog

    The Endangered Species Act prohibits federal agencies from authorizing, funding, or carrying out activities likely to result in adverse modification of critical habitat. That sounds like a powerful prohibition, but for years, figuring out what counts as adverse modification has been a challenge.

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  10. DEP: Pa. cities with high lead exposure rates shouldn't blame the waterRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | PennLive.com

    Harrisburg is one of 18 Pennsylvania cities highlighted in a Voc.com report has having higher rates of lead exposure than the rest of the state. After analyzing public water systems in Pennsylvania cities with high lead exposure rates, the state Department of Environmental Equality says the drinking water isn't to blame for high blood lead levels.

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  11. Chemical cleanup continues at foreclosed GR plantRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | WOODTV.com

    The site is at the corner of Blane Avenue and Cottage Grove SE. Last year, the Kent County Land Bank took over the closed chrome plating company due to unpaid property taxes and discovered about 100 drums containing various highly corrosive chemicals were still there.

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  12. School district buys 25 news busesRead the original story

    Monday Feb 8 | Daytona Beach News-Journal Online

    Twenty-five new buses, totaling more than $2 million, are on the way for Volusia County Schools. The 77-passenger buses will replace older ones in the fleet that have exceeded 12 years of age and the 200,000-mile mark.

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  13. Eminent Domain: Be Careful What You Ask ForRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | JD Supra

    The condemnation [1] of property for public works may not always be as clean and easy as the government would like. Although local governments are often critical players in the cleanup and redevelopment of contaminated properties, contaminated property can: trigger disclosure requirements; lead to environmental liability, for example, under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act or an analogous state statute; [2] and/or impact the ultimate valuation of the property.

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  14. Are You in Compliance with OSHA's New Confined Space Standard for the Construction Industry?Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | JD Supra

    Most employers in the construction industry already know that OSHA issued a new confined space standard for construction that became effective on August 3, 2015. Companies with employees who enter confined spaces at construction sites must be sure to understand the new regulation and adjust their processes in order to remain in compliance.

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  15. First-Ever Airplane Carbon Pollution Limits Take FlightRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | US News & World Report

    Close to two dozen nations agreed to the first-ever carbon pollution limits for commercial airplanes Monday, the latest step on the international stage to rein in the heat-trapping emissions that fuel global warming. The standards, achieved by a U.N. committee at a meeting in Montreal, would reduce carbon emissions by more than 650 million tons between 2020 and 2040 - or roughly equivalent to taking about 140 million cars off the road for a year, the White House said.

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  16. EPA edicts hurt rural AmericaRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | The Hill

    Later this week, the House Agriculture Committee will have the opportunity to examine the regulatory agenda of the Environmental Protection Agency and its effects on Americans living in rural areas. Administrator Gina McCarthy will be testifying, and I look forward to a lively back-and-forth with the administrator, as I am certain the committee will have questions regarding the effects of the agency's regulations on farmers and ranchers.

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  17. Why Do the Postal Service, USDA, EPA, And Department of Agriculture Need SWAT Teams?Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | South Milwaukee

    Military-Style Units From Government Agencies That Have No Association with National Security are Wreaking Havoc on Non-Violent Citizens All throughout the United States there are government agencies who have no association with national security acquiring military-like equipment, according to news talk KFLD . Many agencies are also receiving SWAT teams including the Department of Agriculture, the Railroad Retirement Board, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Office of Personnel Management, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Education Department.

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  18. St. Louis utility company pushes back against carbon rulesRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | Valley Morning Star

    The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that even though Ameren Missouri hasn't filed a court challenge itself, the utility asked the Environmental Protection Agency to prevent implementation of the regulations and re-propose new ones.

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  19. Dates And Locations Of 'Modernizing The Regulatory System For...Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Feb 8 | JD Supra

    On February 1, 2016, the dates and locations for the last two public engagement sessions discussing the " Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products " memorandum were announced. The first meeting occurred on October 30, 2015, and a record of the meeting is available on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website .

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  20. Grafton selectmen authorize financing for Clean Water TrustRead the original story

    Monday Feb 8 | Community Advocate Newspaper

    The Grafton Board of Selectmen voted unanimously at its Feb. 2 meeting to issue bonds not to exceed $44.2 million for support of the town's involvement in the Massachusetts Clean Water Trust . Authority to do so was obtained by a town vote in October, 2014, with a limit on borrowing of $49 million.

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