Cysticercosis Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Cysticercosis.

Results 1 - 20 of 50 in Cysticercosis

  1. Tape Worm Drug Shows Promise Against MRSA - Superbug'Read the original story

    Friday Apr 24 | P&T Community

    A new study provides evidence from lab experiments that a drug already used in people to fight tapeworms might also prove effective against strains of the "superbug" methicilin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , which kills thousands of people a year in the U.S. The paper, published in PloS One , showed that niclosamide, which is on the World Health Organization's list of essential medicines, suppressed the growth of dozens of MRSA cultures in lab dishes and preserved the lives of nematode worms infected with the bug. In these tests, both niclosamide and a closely related veterinary parasite drug, oxyclozanide, proved to be as effective as the current last-resort clinical treatment, vancomycin.

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  2. Human tape worm drug shows promise against MRSA in labRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Apr 23 | Science Daily

    A drug already approved to fight tapeworms in people, effectively treated MRSA superbugs in lab cultures and in infected nematode worms. The scientists are pursuing further testing with hope that the findings will lead to new treatments for deadly MRSA infections.

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  3. Human parasites found in medieval cesspit reveal links between Middle East and EuropeRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 23, 2015 | Medical News Today

    A new analysis of a medieval cesspit in the Christian quarter of the old city of Jerusalem has revealed the presence of a number of ancient parasite eggs, providing a window into the nature and spread of infectious diseases in the Middle East during the 15th century. This is an image of excavation deep down into the latrine by the Ecole Biblique de Jerusalem.

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  4. New analysis of medieval cesspit in Jerusalem provides window into spread of infectious diseasesRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 23, 2015 | Medical News

    A new analysis of a medieval cesspit in the Christian quarter of the old city of Jerusalem has revealed the presence of a number of ancient parasite eggs, providing a window into the nature and spread of infectious diseases in the Middle East during the 15th century. Researchers found evidence of six species of intestinal parasites in the over 500-year-old latrine.

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  5. New tests reveal wild river beavers were once native to the WestRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 20, 2015 | This Is Somerset

    DNA tests have confirmed beavers found living wild on a river in England are a species which was once native in the country. Devon Wildlife Trust said the results of the tests on the aquatic mammals captured from the River Otter in Devon, which showed they were Eurasian rather than North American beavers, meant they were another step closer to being released back to the river.

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  6. Medieval Latrine In Jerusalem Provides Window Into Spread Of Infectious DiseasesRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 19, 2015 | Scientific Blogging

    A medieval cesspit in the old city of Jerusalem has revealed the presence of a number of ancient parasite eggs, which gives researchers a glimpse into the nature and spread of infectious diseases in the Middle East during the 15th century. Scientists found evidence of six species of intestinal parasites in the 500-year-old latrine, which included large quantities of roundworm and whipworm, both spread by fecal contamination of food and probably endemic to the region dating back to human evolution out of Africa.

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  7. Human parasites found in medieval cesspit reveal links between Middle East and EuropeRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 19, 2015 | Science Daily

    Analysis of a latrine in Jerusalem that dates back over 500 years finds human parasites common in northern Europe yet very rare in Middle East at the time, suggesting long-distance trade or pilgrimage routes and shedding light on prevalent infectious diseases of the age. Analysis of a latrine in Jerusalem that dates back over 500 years finds human parasites common in northern Europe yet very rare in Middle East at the time, suggesting long-distance trade or pilgrimage routes and shedding light on prevalent infectious diseases of the age.

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  8. Human Parasites Found in Medieval Cesspit Provide Insights on Disease Spread in 15th CenturyRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 19, 2015 | Infection Control Today

    This is an image of excavation deep down into the latrine by the Ecole Biblique de Jerusalem. Photo courtesy of Jean-Baptiste Humbert.

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  9. Elephants now parading to the unemployment officeRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 14, 2015 | Murfreesboro Post

    For the record, I don't own an elephant, and I haven't seen a circus in years -- not counting watching the U.S. Senate on C-Span. So when it comes to the recent decision by the Ringling Brothers Circus to end its elephant acts under pressure by animal-rights activists, I don't have a dog in the fight.

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  10. West Dorset farmers count the cost of dog messRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 12, 2015 | Bridportnews.co.uk

    NFU county chairman Trevor Cligg and branch chairman Tina Lester-Card at Mapperton Farm as part of a campaign to get dogs wormed due to sheep being rejected at slaughter - 030315, Picture GRAHAM HUNT HG12893 NFU county chairman Trevor Cligg and branch chairman Tina Lester-Card at Mapperton Farm as part of a campaign to get dogs wormed due to sheep being rejected at slaughter - 030315, Picture GRAHAM HUNT HG12893 NFU county chairman Trevor Cligg and branch chairman Tina Lester-Card at Mapperton Farm as part of a campaign to get dogs wormed due to sheep being rejected at slaughter - 030315, Picture GRAHAM HUNT HG12893 Joe Lintell from Mapperton has just had 18 of his sheep rejected by the butcher, worth more than A 1000 - because they are infected with a worm carried by dogs.

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  11. Unsolicited Advice From Warren BuffettRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 2, 2015 | New York Magazine

    Capitalist fever dream and humanCoca-Cola hybrid Warren Buffett has a lot of opinions, and because he is also a man, he loves sharing them unprompted. In addition to advising celebrities like A-Rod and Floyd Mayweather , he's also fond of chiming in out of nowhere to bestow his wisdom upon unsuspecting targets.

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  12. Notes from the Field: Identification of a Taenia Tapeworm Carrier - Los Angeles County, 2014Read the original story

    Jan 29, 2015 | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Carriers of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium , are the sole source of cysticercosis, a parasitic tissue infection . When tapeworm eggs excreted by the carrier are ingested, tapeworm larvae can form cysts.

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  13. Tapeworm Diet - lose weight fast, at a priceRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 28, 2015 | The Red Ferret Journal

    We need a yeeuw tag here really, so don't read on if you're a bit squeamish. Apparently if you are desperate enough to lose weight, you can invest your cash in something called the Tapeworm Diet .

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  14. Worms can invade your brainRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 22, 2015 | Trinidad Guardian

    Infection of the brain by the larval form of the pork tapeworm arises from poor sanitation and hygiene, such as failing to wash your hands. Once you consume them, they can move throughout your body-your eyes, your tissues and most commonly your brain.

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  15. Gypsy moth damage on nearly 2.4 million acres, and more: Outdoor InsiderRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 21, 2015 | PennLive.com

    With the recent Atlantic State Marine Fisheries Commission mandate to rebuild the striped bass stock along the Atlantic Coast, the Coastal Conservation Association of Maryland has called for the protection of the forage fish that are an essential part of the diet of these striped bass. "CCA MD urges the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council to continue to be proactive in its pursuit of protection for unmanaged forage fish," the association wrote in a letter sent today to MAFMC, which is scheduled to meet Monday, Dec. 8, in Baltimore.

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  16. 'Mysterious' tapeworm removed from man's brain after 4 yearsRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 21, 2015 | New York Post

    Four years ago, doctors saw a British man who had been complaining of headaches after visiting China, South Korea, Japan and Thailand. They treated him for tuberculosis, but when he returned, he exhibited a host of more bizarre symptoms, CNN reported.

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  17. The worms that invade your brainRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 20, 2015 | WLKY-TV Louisville

    Once you consume them, they can move throughout your body -- your eyes, your tissues and most commonly your brain. They leave doctors puzzled in their wake as they migrate and settle to feed on the body they're invading; a classic parasite, but this one can get into your head. 2 comments

  18. Surgeons remove rare tapeworm from man's brain 4 years after infestationRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 20, 2015 | Fox News

    Four years ago, doctors saw a British man who had been complaining of headaches after visiting China, South Korea, Japan and Thailand. They treated him for tuberculosis, but when he returned, he exhibited a host of more bizarre symptoms, CNN reported.

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  19. Man Suffers From Headaches For Years, Doctors Find Tapeworm In BrainRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 20, 2015 | 5NEWSonline.com

    Once you consume them, they can move throughout your body - your eyes, your tissues and most commonly your brain. They leave doctors puzzled in their wake as they migrate and settle to feed on the body they're invading; a classic parasite, but this one can get into your head.

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  20. Doctors find tapeworm moving in man's brain after years of headachesRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 20, 2015 | WTKR-TV Norfolk

    Once you consume them, they can move throughout your body - your eyes, your tissues and most commonly your brain. They leave doctors puzzled in their wake as they migrate and settle to feed on the body they're invading; a classic parasite, but this one can get into your head.

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