Xeloda, Capecitabine
Xeloda, Capecitabine Newswire (Page 2)

Xeloda, Capecitabine Newswire (Page 2)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Xeloda, Capecitabine (generic). (Page 2)

Results 21 - 40 of 107 in Xeloda, Capecitabine (generic)

  1. Colorectal Cancer Therapeutics In Major Developed Market is expected...Read the original story w/Photo

    May 22, 2015 | Medgadget

    EHS offers "a single point-of-contact for purchasing digital advertising and sponsorships online, in email, and via mobile to achieve significant reach to targeted niche healthcare audiences."

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  2. WHO names 16 cancer drugs as essential medicinesRead the original story w/Photo

    May 20, 2015 | Nurse.com

    Sixteen cancer drugs have been added to the World Health Organization's Model List of Essential Medicines. Among those recommended are high-cost medicines including imatinib, to treat leukemia; trastuzumab, to treat early and advanced stage breast cancer; and rituximab for lymphomas and leukemia, according to the April 2015 Report of the 20th WHO Expert Committee on the Selection and Use of Essential Medicines.

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  3. Tumor regression and survival after perioperative MAGIC-style...Read the original story

    May 21, 2015 | BioMed Central

    This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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  4. Drug combination lengthens lives of metastatic colorectal cancer patientsRead the original story w/Photo

    May 15, 2015 | Medical News

    A drug developed 50 years ago and abandoned because it was considered to be too toxic has gained a second life in an international clinical trial. Research led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute showed the drug and a potentiating agent lengthened the lives of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, all of whom had exhausted available standard treatments.

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  5. New Drug Combination Extends Survival of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal CancerRead the original story

    May 13, 2015 | Newswise

    A drug developed 50 years ago and abandoned because it was considered to be too toxic has gained a second life in an international clinical trial. Research led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute showed the drug and a potentiating agent lengthened the lives of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, all of whom had exhausted available standard treatments.

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  6. Drug extends survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    May 13, 2015 | PhysOrg Weblog

    A drug developed 50 years ago and abandoned because it was considered to be too toxic has gained a second life in an international clinical trial. Research led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute showed the drug and a potentiating agent lengthened the lives of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, all of whom had exhausted available standard treatments.

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  7. AbbVie To Present New Data From Studies Of Five Oncology Pipeline Assets In Multiple Cancers At TheRead the original story

    May 10, 2015 | BioSpace

    AbbVie To Present New Data From Studies Of Five Oncology Pipeline Assets In Multiple Cancers At The 51st American Society Of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting /PRNewswire/ -- AbbVie announced 17 abstracts from studies of the company's oncology pipeline are being presented at the 51st Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology , .

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  8. Randomized phase III clinical trial comparing the combination of...Read the original story

    May 8, 2015 | BioMed Central

    Background The aim of the trial was to compare two active adjuvant chemotherapy regimens in patients with early stage colorectal cancer . Methods Patients were assigned to oxaliplatin, leucovorin and 5-FU for 12 cycles or oxaliplatin and capecitabine for eight cycles .

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  9. Nektar Therapeutics Reports Financial Results For The First Quarter Of 2015Read the original story

    Apr 30, 2015 | BioSpace

    "In the first quarter, we initiated enrollment for the SUMMIT-07 efficacy study of NKTR-181 in patients with chronic low back pain. We are also finalizing preparations for our new cancer immunotherapy, NKTR-214, to enter clinical studies this year.

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  10. Capecitabine and irinotecan with bevacizumab 2-weekly for metastatic...Read the original story

    Apr 28, 2015 | BioMed Central

    Reina SofA a Hospital, University of CA3rdoba, Maimonides Institute of Biomedical Research . Spanish Cancer Network , Instituto de Salud Carlos III, CA3rdoba, Spain Background The optimal sequence of chemotherapeutic agents is not firmly established for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer .

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  11. Woman Denied Bank Transaction Because Chemo Erased Her FingerprintsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 22, 2015 | KNEB-AM Scottsbluff

    The woman, who is not identified by name, was 65 and had undergone chemotherapy three times to fight stage IV triple negative breast cancer, according to the study. As a result, she developed hand-foot syndrome, a rare side-effect of certain chemotherapy drugs, like capecitabine, that causes swelling on the hands and feet.

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  12. Woman Denied at Bank Because Chemo Erased Her FingerprintsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 22, 2015 | ABC News

    After a rare side effect of chemotherapy left a woman without fingerprints, she was denied a bank transaction, according to a case study published in the New England Journal of Medicine . The woman, who is not identified by name, was 65 and had undergone chemotherapy three times to fight stage IV triple negative breast cancer , according to the study.

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  13. Woman denied bank transaction after chemotherapy erases her fingerprintsRead the original story

    Apr 21, 2015 | The Washington Post

    As if having stage IV breast cancer isn't enough to deal with, a 65-year-old woman in Mexico City was turned away at a bank after chemotherapy erased her fingerprints. The "hand-foot syndrome" that caused the problem is an occasional but little-known side-effect of some chemotherapy medications.

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  14. Chemo for breast cancer erases woman's fingerprintsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 19, 2015 | Philly.com

    A 65-year-old breast cancer patient ran into an unexpected problem with her bank: She was denied a transaction because her fingerprints had disappeared. Reporting in the April 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine , doctors in Mexico said the woman's unusual case was due to the effects of chemotherapy for an advanced breast cancer that had spread to the lungs.

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  15. No Fingerprints? After Chemo, This 65-Year-Old Woman Could Be A Stealthy ThiefRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 17, 2015 | Medical Daily

    Trying to perform a transaction at her bank, a 65-year-old Mexican woman was unceremoniously turned down. Disbelieving, she tried again; after all, she knew she had enough money in her account.

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  16. Rare side effect erased woman's fingerprintsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 16, 2015 | WTSP-TV Saint Petersburg

    A 65-year-old breast cancer patient ran into an unexpected problem with her bank: She was denied a transaction because her fingerprints had Rare side effect erased woman's fingerprints A 65-year-old breast cancer patient ran into an unexpected problem with her bank: She was denied a transaction because her fingerprints had Check out this story on wtsp.com: http://on.wtsp.com/1yy4uT2 Doctors say a 65-year-old woman's fingerprints virtually disappeared as a result of a rare side effect of chemotherapy. A 65-year-old breast cancer patient ran into an unexpected problem with her bank: She was denied a transaction because her fingerprints had disappeared.

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  17. Bizarre Cancer Drug Side Effect: Fingerprints DisappearRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 16, 2015 | News Max

    A 65-year-old breast cancer patient ran into an unexpected problem with her bank: She was denied a transaction because her fingerprints had disappeared. Reporting in the April 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine , doctors in Mexico said the woman's unusual case was due to the effects of chemotherapy for an advanced breast cancer that had spread to the lungs.

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  18. The woman whose fingerprints were ERASED: Cancer patient discovers...Read the original story w/Photo

    Apr 16, 2015 | Daily Mail

    Capecitabine causes hand-foot syndrome, where patient's experience redness, swelling, blistering and peeling of skin on the hands and feet A cancer patient discovered her fingerprints had disappeared when she was denied authorisation to perform a banking transaction because her prints were unrecognisable. An investigation of her case, to determine how her fingerprints had disappeared, led doctors to conclude a common cancer drug, capecitabine was to blame.

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  19. "Colorectal Cancer Therapeutics in Major Developed Markets to 2020"...Read the original story

    Apr 15, 2015 | PR-inside.com

    GBI Research, the leading business intelligence provider, has released its latest research, "Colorectal Cancer Therapeutics in Major Developed Markets to 2020 - ", which provides in-depth analysis of the Colorectal Cancer therapeutics market in the eight major geographies of the US, Canada, the UK, France, Germany, Spain, Italy and Japan. The report provides an estimation of the market size for 2013, along with market forecast until 2020.

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  20. Neratinib Plus Capecitabine Shows Promise in HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer StudyRead the original story

    Apr 14, 2015 | PressReleasePoint

    A small, stage I/II study found that giving the anti-cancer medicines neratinib and capecitabine at the same time may help people with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer that is no longer responding to standard treatment. Breast cancer is HER2-positive when a tumor grows because too many human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 proteins cause cells to multiply more quickly than normal.

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