DanaFarber Cancer Institute Newswire (Page 8)

DanaFarber Cancer Institute Newswire (Page 8)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for DanaFarber Cancer Institute. (Page 8)

Results 141 - 160 of 1,400 in DanaFarber Cancer Institute

  1. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Joins the Parker Institute for Cancer ImmunotherapyRead the original story

    Oct 16, 2017 | PressReleasePoint

    The Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy today announced that researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have joined its network. Dana-Farber is a leader in cancer research and brings a team of experts who will collaborate with Parker Institute investigators to enhance and expand research projects and clinical trials.

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  2. Mark R. Harris, 61, of ShrewsburyRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 16, 2017 | Community Advocate Newspaper

    Mark R. Harris, 61, of Shrewsbury, died peacefully Friday, Oct. 13, 2017, surrounded by his loving family, in the Rose Monahan Hospice House in Worcester. Mark's warm smile, sound advice and loving character touched all that knew him in a very special way.

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  3. Truckers help celebrate boy, 4, beating cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 14, 2017 | Boston Herald

    Boston Bruins mascot Blade rides on Vermont's Pink Heals fire truck, part of a large convoy of over 70 trucks celebrating the cancer remission of Tommy Cook, 4, of Georgetown. Saturday, October 14, 2017.

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  4. Cancer survivors will speak at fundraising events this monthRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 13, 2017 | Sentinel & Enterprise

    Smith, a Fitchburg resident, recovered and now wants to give back to the group that saw her through her surgery and ongoing check-ups: the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Smith is the organizer of two events this October for Cancer Awareness Month.

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  5. Loci associated with skin pigmentation identified in African populationsRead the original story

    Oct 12, 2017 | Science

    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Department of Physiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.

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  6. Study finds cold therapy may be effective at controlling cancer treatment side effectsRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 12, 2017 | PhysOrg Weblog

    A new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that cryotherapy, specifically having chemotherapy patients wear frozen gloves and socks for 90-minute periods, is useful for preventing symptoms of neuropathy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a frequent and disabling side effect of cancer treatment .

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  7. Researchers find potential approach to prevent peripheral neuropathyRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 11, 2017 | Medical News

    In discovering how certain chemotherapy drugs cause the nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have found a potential approach to preventing this common and troublesome side effect of cancer treatment. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, which affects about one-third of patients receiving chemotherapy, include numbness, tingling, and pain in the hands and feet.

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  8. Scientists aim to address racial and ethnic disparities in cancer researchRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 11, 2017 | MSN Healthy Living

    Panelist Timothy Rebbeck, left, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, talks with Franklin Huang of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute talk prior to the "Cancer disparities and diversity in the Life Sciences" panel discussion at the UMass Club in Boston, Oct. 11, 2017. It is a medical puzzle: why are death rates for black men with prostate cancer almost 2.5 times the rate of white men in the United States? But even that doesn't fully explain the disparity, said Timothy Rebbek, a professor of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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  9. Discovery of peripheral neuropathy cause suggests potential preventive measuresRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 11, 2017 | PhysOrg Weblog

    In discovering how certain chemotherapy drugs cause the nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have found a potential approach to preventing this common and troublesome side effect of cancer treatment. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy , which affects about one-third of patients receiving chemotherapy, include numbness, tingling, and pain in the hands and feet.

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  10. Let them eat caviar: When charity galas waste moneyRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 11, 2017 | Salon

    On the auction block to raise money to carry out its mission of assisting people with intellectual and developmental disabilities were yacht excursions, lunch with Bravo's "Real Housewives of Miami" star Lea Black and a "power breakfast" during New York's Fashion Week with a branding expert. Why juxtapose calls to feed the hungry, house the homeless and cure cancer with champagne toasts and caviar hors d'oeuvres? As researchers who study charities, we understand why opulent bashes that raise money for good causes seem puzzling.

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  11. Stephen Blyth: Cancer, chemo, and the road to - self-compassion'Read the original story w/Photo

    Oct 9, 2017 | Boston.com

    The National Cancer Institute tries to be helpful: "At some point during chemotherapy, you may feel: Anxious; Depressed; Afraid; Angry; Frustrated; Helpless; Lonely. It is normal to have a wide range of feelings while going through chemotherapy.

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  12. Aggressive breast cancer treatment tied to more missed workRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 9, 2017 | Channelnewsasia.com

    Many women with early-stage breast cancer have full-time jobs when they're diagnosed, and they are more likely to miss at least a month of work when they receive aggressive treatment that includes surgery, a U.S. study suggests. The majority of women in the study had surgery - either a lumpectomy that removes malignant tissue while sparing the rest of the breast or a mastectomy that removes the entire breast.

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  13. After surviving a rare childhood disease, CICALE now gives back with...Read the original story w/Photo

    Oct 7, 2017 | Lowell Sun

    When Kaitlyn Cicale was growing up in Hampstead, New Hampshire, she came down with a rare, life-threatening bacterial infection. At 4 years old, she was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of E. coli infection that damages and destroys red-blood cells and caused her kidneys to shut down.

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  14. A new CRISPR-engineered cancer model to test therapeuticsRead the original story

    Oct 5, 2017 | PressReleasePoint

    One major challenge in cancer research is developing robust pre-clinical models for new therapies, ones that will accurately reflect a human response to a novel compound. All too often, a potential treatment that initially looked promising in cells or animal models will not have the same effects in a human cancer patient.

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  15. Checkpoint Initiates Phase I Study of Anti-PD-L1 Antibody CK-301Read the original story

    Oct 4, 2017 | BioSpace

    Checkpoint Therapeutics, Inc. , a Fortress Biotech company, today announced that the first patient has been dosed in a Phase 1 clinical study evaluating the safety and tolerability of CK-301 in checkpoint therapy-naive patients with selected recurrent or metastatic cancers. CK-301 is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds to Programmed Death-Ligand 1 and blocks its interaction with the Programmed Death-1 and B7.1 receptors.

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  16. Checkpoint Therapeutics Initiates Phase 1 Study of Anti-PD-L1 Antibody CK-301Read the original story

    Oct 5, 2017 | Customer Interaction Solutions

    Checkpoint Therapeutics, Inc. , a Fortress Biotech company, today announced that the first patient has been dosed in a Phase 1 clinical study evaluating the safety and tolerability of CK-301 in checkpoint therapy-naA ve patients with selected recurrent or metastatic cancers. CK-301 is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds to Programmed Death-Ligand 1 and blocks its interaction with the Programmed Death-1 and B7.1 receptors.

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  17. Mortgage Equity Partners Raises Money to Help Fight CancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 4, 2017 | 24-7 Press Release

    Mortgage Equity Partners raised over $3200 in support of David Holding, Vice President of Secondary Markets, helping to bring the amount of money raised by David to over $6000. The Pan Mass Challenge is a 192-mile bike ride from Sturbridge MA to Provincetown MA, and the money raised by the PMC is donated directly to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

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  18. ...read moreRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 4, 2017 | Sampan

    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is offering a course to provide you with the skills and information to be an advocate for breast health and breast cancer early detection in your community. During the free, one-day course you will learn about breast cancer, screening guidelines, and how to increase awareness in the community.

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  19. Neon Therapeutics Enters License Agreement With The Netherlands...Read the original story

    Oct 3, 2017 | BioSpace

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. & AMSTERDAM-- -- Neon Therapeutics , an immuno-oncology company developing neoantigen-based therapeutic vaccines and T cell therapies to treat cancer, today announced that the company has entered into an exclusive license agreement with the Netherlands Cancer Institute for technology to be utilized in Neon Therapeutics' personalized neoantigen T cell therapy program, NEO-PTC-01.

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  20. Little Green football wearing orange for MayaRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 4, 2017 | Foster's Daily Democrat

    Little Green Football in Dover is known for its prowess on the football field, but this coming weekend, they will be focusing on one of their core principles - community service to help a team member's family. For more than 30 years, the Little Green, made up of seventh- and eighth-grade students, has been a feeder program for the Dover High School team.

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