UC San Francisco Newswire (Page 9)

UC San Francisco Newswire (Page 9)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for UC San Francisco. (Page 9)

Results 161 - 180 of 4,202 in UC San Francisco

  1. Doubt raised over surgery to treat Stage 0 breast cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Aug 20 | Seattle Times

    Up to 60,000 U.S. women each year are told they have an early stage of breast cancer - Stage 0, as it is commonly known - a possible precursor to what could be a deadly tumor. And almost every one of the women has either a lumpectomy or a mastectomy, and often a double mastectomy, removing a healthy breast as well.

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  2. 1000s of breast cancer patients have surgery 'needlessly'Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Aug 20 | Mail on Sunday

    Debilitating and distressing operations do not improve survival chances for patients with a common form of early breast cancer, a study found. Furthermore, patients with this type of the illness - considered a precursor to a more serious form - are no more likely to die than the general population.

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  3. Statistical advances help unlock mysteries of the human microbiomeRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Aug 13 | Science Blog

    Advances in the field of statistics are helping to unlock the mysteries of the human microbiome -the vast collection of microorganisms living in and on the bodies of humans, said Katherine Pollard, a statistician and biome expert, during a session today at the 2015 Joint Statistical Meetings in Seattle. Pollard, senior investigator at the Gladstone Institutes and professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco, delivered a presentation titled " Estimating Taxonomic and Functional Diversity in Shotgun Metagenomes " during an invited session focused on statistics, the microbiome and human health .

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  4. Statistical Software Helps Unlock Mysteries of Human MicrobiomeRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Aug 13 | Scientific Computing/Instrument.

    Advances in the field of statistics are helping to unlock the mysteries of the human microbiome - the vast collection of microorganisms living in and on the bodies of humans, said Katherine Pollard, a statistician and biome expert, during a session at the 2015 Joint Statistical Meetings in Seattle. Pollard, senior investigator at the Gladstone Institutes and professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco, delivered a presentation titled " Estimating Taxonomic and Functional Diversity in Shotgun Metagenomes " during an invited session focused on statistics, the microbiome and human health.

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  5. The role of B cells in the enhancement of pollen allergyRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Aug 13 | PhysOrg Weblog

    ... system's response to vaccines and putting the elderly at ... In a project spearheaded by investigators at UC San Francisco, scientists have devised a new strategy to precisely modify human T cells using the genome-editing system known as ...

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  6. Characterizing Race/Ethnicity and Genetic Ancestry for 100,000...Read the original story

    Thursday Aug 13 | Genetics current issue

    Characterizing Race/Ethnicity and Genetic Ancestry for 100,000 Subjects in the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging Cohort Corresponding authors: University of California San Francisco, Institute for Human Genetics, 513 Parnassus Ave., San Francisco, CA 94143-0794. E-mail: Using genome-wide genotypes, we characterized the genetic structure of 103,006 participants in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California multi-ethnic Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging Cohort and analyzed the relationship to self-reported race/ethnicity.

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  7. What 'Game of Thrones' Does to Your Heart RateRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Aug 13 | Wall Street Journal

    Anyone who follows Game of Thrones knows that few things can set your heart racing quite like Valyrian Steel. Now there's data to prove it.

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  8. FDA Approves U.S. Product Labeling Update for SprycelA (dasatinib)...Read the original story

    Thursday Aug 13 | Freshnews

    Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved an update to the Sprycel product labeling. The labeling now includes five-year efficacy and safety data in adult patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase and seven-year data in CP Ph+ CML patients who are resistant1 or intolerant2 to prior therapy, including Gleevec 3 .

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  9. Botox Stops SweatingRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 12 | KSAT-TV San Antonio

    Millions of people use Botox to smooth out wrinkles on their forehead and erase crow's feet around the eyes, but Botox, the brand name for what's called botulinum toxin, is most widely used for medical conditions and the results c an be life-changing. JoAnn Kemist endures hundreds of shots of Botox in her hands every three months.

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  10. IAVI Names Dr. Mark Feinberg New President and CEORead the original story

    Wednesday Aug 12 | Freshnews

    The Board of Directors of the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative announced today that Mark Feinberg, MD, PhD, has been appointed IAVI's new President and CEO, effective 8 September 2015. "Mark brings a wealth of relevant experience and the passion to lead IAVI through the next chapter of our journey towards an AIDS vaccine," said Alex Coutinho, IAVI Board Chair.

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  11. Cancelled Meeting: UCSF AnnouncementRead the original story

    Wednesday Aug 12 | Potrero View

    As you may know, UC San Francisco is proposing to develop a research building at San Francisco General Hospital on a surface parking lot owned by the City and County of San Francisco, located along 23rd Street between Vermont and Utah Streets. In addition, the City and County of San Francisco may propose to expand the existing SFGH public parking structure at 2500 24th Street.

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  12. Brain plasticity after vision loss has an 'on-off switch'Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 12 | PhysOrg Weblog

    ... and adult stability. Now Yale School of Medicine researchers have ... (Medical Xpress)-In a new study by UC San Francisco scientists, running, when accompanied by visual stimuli, restored brain function to normal levels in mice that had been ...

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  13. Ion channel blockers prove useful in cancer therapyRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 12 | Medical News

    Drugs called ion channel blockers, which are commonly used to treat cardiac, neurological, and psychiatric disorders, might prove useful in cancer therapy, according to research findings in fruit flies and mice by UC San Francisco scientists that led to unconventional treatment of a case of metastatic brain cancer. Ion channels, proteins that form pores in cell membranes, play central roles in organs in which conduction of electrical signals is vital, such as the brain and heart, but they are found in cells throughout the body.

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  14. Library NewsRead the original story

    May 30, 2015 | Potrero View

    Join the Library's reading program, Summer Stride 2015! Sign up at the branch or register online at www.sfpl.org/summerstride. Adults and teenagers will get a canvas tote bag after finishing 15 hours of reading.

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  15. Natividad Medical Center Offers a Free Child Passenger Seat CheckRead the original story

    Tuesday Aug 11 | PR Log

    PRLog - Aug. 12, 2015 - Press Contact: Marci Bracco Cain 747-7455 Natividad Medical Center and the Monterey County Health Department Offer a Free Child Passenger Seat Check For The Community Save the Date for Sunday, September 13th SALINAS, CA -- Did you know that 4 out of 5 child passenger safety seats are installed or adjusted incorrectly? Could yours be one of them? Monterey County Residents are invited to join Natividad Medical Center and the Monterey County Health Department for a free community event.

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  16. Staving Off Alzheimer'sRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Aug 11 | The Huffington Post

    Alzheimer's - already afflicting well over five million Americans -- is expected to claim more than 16 million of us by 2050 if a cure isn't found. Today it is at the top of the Bad News list of potential diagnoses for almost anyone over 50. Justifiably so, since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports than one in three seniors now die with Alzheimer's or other dementia.

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  17. Could Doctors Soon Be Prescribing Video Games For Mental Health?Read the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Aug 11 | Switched

    Treatment for mental health disorders tends to fall into one of three categories: therapy, medication or both. But a neuroscientist wants to change that with a video game he conceptualized that's being tested for the market.

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  18. More than just curing unwanted wrinkles, Botox prevents sweatingRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Aug 11 | WNDU-TV South Bend

    Millions of people use Botox to smooth out wrinkles on their forehead and erase crow's feet around the eyes, but Botox, the brand name for what's called botulinum toxin, is most widely used for medical conditions and the results can be life-changing. JoAnn Kemist endures hundreds of shots of Botox in her hands every three months.

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  19. Common Class of 'Channel Blocking' Drugs May Find a Role in Cancer TherapyRead the original story

    Monday Aug 10 | Newswise

    Drugs called ion channel blockers, which are commonly used to treat cardiac, neurological, and psychiatric disorders, might prove useful in cancer therapy, according to research findings in fruit flies and mice by UC San Francisco scientists that led to unconventional treatment of a case of metastatic brain cancer. Ion channels, proteins that form pores in cell membranes, play central roles in organs in which conduction of electrical signals is vital, such as the brain and heart, but they are found in cells throughout the body.

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  20. Zogenix Provides Corporate Update And Reports Second Quarter 2015 Financial ResultsRead the original story

    Monday Aug 10 | BioSpace

    Zogenix, Inc. , a pharmaceutical company developing and commercializing products for the treatment of central nervous system disorders, provided a corporate update, and announced financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2015. Presented new data at European Paediatric Neurology Society Congress in Vienna, Austria, demonstrating sustained efficacy and tolerability for patients treated with low-dose fenfluramine as an adjunctive therapy for Dravet syndrome.

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