UC San Francisco Newswire (Page 6)

UC San Francisco Newswire (Page 6)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for UC San Francisco. (Page 6)

Results 101 - 120 of 4,375 in UC San Francisco

  1. Glioma subtypes determine how the dangerous tumors spread, evade anti-angiogenic treatmentRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 27 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Tumorous glial cells, labeled in green, have overtaken most of an adult fly brain. Glial cell nuclei are shown in red.

    Comment?

  2. Fetal Immune System May Spark Premature BirthRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Apr 26 | News Max

    Most potential explanations of premature birth revolve around the mother, and what might cause her body to reject her developing fetus. A new study suggests some preterm births occur because the fetus rejects the mother, after its immune system is triggered too early and senses maternal cells as foreign invaders.

    Comment?

  3. Preventive Use of Common Antibiotic Reduces Child Mortality in Sub-Saharan AfricaRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Apr 26 | Science Blog

    Treating young children in Sub-Saharan Africa with azithromycin, a safe, inexpensive, and widely used antibiotic, significantly reduced deaths of children under five in a large randomized trial led by scientists at UC San Francisco. The finding could help speed progress toward the United Nations' goal of ending preventable child deaths by 2030.

    Comment?

  4. People diagnosed with traumatic brain injury may have increased risk...Read the original story w/Photo

    Apr 19, 2018 | Medical News

    People who have been diagnosed with a mild concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury, may have a 56 percent increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the April 18, 2018, online issue of Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "Previous research has shown a strong link between moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease but the research on mild traumatic brain injury has not been conclusive," said senior study author Kristine Yaffe, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco, the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Comment?

  5. One concussion could increase risk of Parkinson's disease, study saysRead the original story

    Apr 18, 2018 | WAAY

    A diagnosis of traumatic brain injury -- whether mild, moderate or severe -- is associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease as well as a two years younger age at diagnosis, new research in veterans says. The size of the risk was found to be dependent on the severity of the injury.

    Comment?

  6. Tyme Technologies (TYME) Given Average Rating of "Strong Buy" by AnalystsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | IntersportsWire

    Tyme Technologies has been given an average broker rating score of 1.00 from the three analysts that provide coverage for the stock, Zacks Investment Research reports. Three equities research analysts have rated the stock with a strong buy rating.

    Comment?

  7. Even a mild head injury increases risk for Parkinson's disease, veterans study showsRead the original story

    Apr 18, 2018 | ABC News

    Even a mild head injury, commonly called a concussion, makes veterans more likely to get Parkinson's disease later on in life, a new study shows. This is the same type of injury suffered by many Americans on the sports field or in a motor vehicle crash each year.

    Comment?

  8. How deep learning is about to transform biomedical scienceRead the original story

    Apr 18, 2018 | KurzweilAI.net

    ... is going to be transformative," said Finkbeiner, who is also a professor of neurology and physiology at UC San Francisco. "Deep learning is going to fundamentally change the way we conduct biomedical science in the future, not only by accelerating ...

    Comment?

  9. Just One Concussion Could Raise Parkinson's RiskRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | HON

    If you've ever had a mild concussion, your risk of developing Parkinson's disease goes up by 56 percent, a new study of more than 300,000 U.S. veterans suggests. "Upwards of 40 percent of adults have had a traumatic brain injury [concussion], so these findings are definitely concerning," said study author Dr. Raquel Gardner.

    Comment?

  10. Mild TBI May Increase Risk of Parkinson's DiseaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | Drugs.com

    Mild traumatic brain injury is associated with increased risk of Parkinson's disease among military veterans, according to a study published online April 18 in Neurology . Raquel C. Gardner, M.D., from the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study involving all patients with a TBI diagnosis in Veterans Health Administration databases from October 2002 to September 2014, age-matched to a random sample of patients without TBI in a 1:1 ratio.

    Comment?

  11. Football scuffles, auto injuries may raise risk for Parkinson'sRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 17, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    ... and John Boscardin , PhD, all of UCSF and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. About UCSF: UC San Francisco (UCSF) is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level ...

    Comment?

  12. Gene Therapy For Inherited Blood Disorder Reduced TransfusionsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | New Hampshire Public Radio -

    Results of a study published Wednesday show that 15 of 22 patients with beta-thalassemia who got gene therapy were able to stop or sharply reduce the regular blood transfusions they had needed to alleviate their life-threatening anemia. There were no serious side effects.

    Comment?

  13. One concussion could increase risk of Parkinsona s disease, study saysRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | WTVR Richmond

    A diagnosis of traumatic brain injury - whether mild, moderate or severe - is associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease as well as a two years younger age at diagnosis, new research in veterans says. The size of the risk was found to be dependent on the severity of the injury.

    Comment?

  14. A Single Concussion May Increase Risk of Parkinson's DiseaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | Newswise

    MINNEAPOLIS People who have been diagnosed with a mild concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury, may have a 56 percent increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the April 18, 2018, online issue of Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology . "Previous research has shown a strong link between moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease but the research on mild traumatic brain injury has not been conclusive," said senior study author Kristine Yaffe, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco, the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Comment?

  15. ALS Treatment Delays DiseaseRead the original story

    Apr 18, 2018 | Health News Digest

    LOS ANGELES a' Investigators at Cedars-Sinai are exploring a new way to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by transplanting specially engineered neural cells into the brain. Their new study shows the transplanted cells delayed disease progression and extended survival in animal models.

    Comment?

  16. Top HIV cure research team refutes major recent results on how to identify HIV persistenceRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | PhysOrg Weblog

    ... T cells," Science Translational Medicine (2018). stm.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/ scitranslmed.aar6759 UC San Francisco scientists have uncovered new mechanisms by which HIV hides in infected cells, resting in a latent state that evades the body's ...

    Comment?

  17. Gene mapping can help doctors pick most appropriate chemotherapyRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | UPI

    Researchers have devised a new gene mapping technique that allows medical providers to determine the chemotherapy with the fewest side effects and best success for individual patients. With more than 100 chemotherapy agents in wide use, researchers at the University of California San Francisco examined the use of computational biology to assist personnel in choosing the best regimen.

    Comment?

  18. Study: Smoke from wildfires could lead to increased risk for heart, stroke issuesRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | KFOR-TV Oklahoma City

    According to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, smoke from wildfires has been known to send people to the hospital with heart issues and stroke-related complaints. Researchers with the Environmental Protection Agency, University of California San Francisco and California Department of Public Health reviewed more than 1 million emergency room visits during intense wildfires.

    Comment?

  19. American Telemedicine Association Holding 25th Anniversary Annual...Read the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | PRWeb

    ATA18 will take place April 29 - May 1 in Chicago; Speakers, Panels, and Special Sessions to explore the future of virtual health, policy, and advances in technology The American Telemedicine Association will hold ATA18, its 25th Annual Conference and Expo, at McCormick Place in Chicago from Sunday, April 29 through Tuesday, May 1. The conference, which is expected to draw more than 5,000 health care and technology professionals from around the world, will showcase cutting edge telehealth and virtual care technology designed to improve access, affordability and quality of healthcare. "Telehealth and virtual care are at an inflection point," said Ann Mond Johnson, ATA's Chief Executive Officer.

    Comment?

  20. New drug may prevent migraines, without side effectsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | MSN Healthy Living

    People who have tried unsuccessfully to prevent migraine with other treatments may find relief with a new drug, according to a preliminary study released Tuesday. Erenumab is part of new class of drugs -fully human monoclonal antibodies - that block calcitonin gene-related peptide , a molecule that transmits migraine pain signals during an attack.

    Comment?