UC San Diego Newswire (Page 7)

UC San Diego Newswire (Page 7)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for UC San Diego. (Page 7)

Results 121 - 140 of 20,835 in UC San Diego

  1. ConforMIS Announces FDA 510(k) Clearance for iTotal Hip SystemRead the original story

    Tuesday Jun 20 | World News Report

    New hip replacement implant system builds on ConforMIS's customized knee replacement technology and positions Company to expand in global orthopedics market / EIN News / -- BILLERICA, Mass., June 20, 2017 -- ConforMIS, Inc. , a medical technology company that offers knee replacement implants customized to fit each patient's unique anatomy, today announced it has received FDA 510 clearance of the Company's primary iTotal Hip replacement system.

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  2. Study Finds Yoga Can Help Back Pain, But Keep It Gentle, With These PosesRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jun 20 | News 88.9 KNPR

    New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as safe and effective as physical therapy in easing pain. The yoga protocol was developed by researchers at Boston Medical Center with input from yoga teachers, doctors and physical therapists.

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  3. Number of Chinese student applicants may drop after UCSD invite to Dalai LamaRead the original story

    Tuesday Jun 20 | Newkerala.com

    Beijing [China], June 20 : The number of Chinese student applicants to the University of California San Diego might drop after the 14th Dalai Lama delivered a commencement speech at the university on Saturday despite strong objections from Chinese students, according to an overseas study consultancy. Chinese students at the UCSD were against the university's decision to call the Dalai Lama as a commencement speaker as well as the school's description of him as "the exiled spiritual" and have been protesting since then.

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  4. Familiar Faces Look Happier Than Unfamiliar OnesRead the original story

    Tuesday Jun 20 | Health News Digest

    People tend to perceive faces they are familiar with as looking happier than unfamiliar faces, even when the faces objectively express the same emotion to the same degree, according to new research published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science . "We show that familiarity with someone else's face affects the happiness you perceive in subsequent facial expressions from that person," says researcher Evan Carr of Columbia Business School.

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  5. Korean companies eye opportunities as US biotech conference beginsRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jun 20 | Korea Herald

    The 2017 Bio International Convention officially kicked off in San Diego, California, on Monday, bringing together thousands of biotech professionals from around the world to exchange knowledge and engage in dialogue over new industry trends and issues. In its 24th year, the four-day conference hosted annually by the Biotechnology Innovation Organization is considered one of the world's biggest biotech and pharmaceutical industry events.

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  6. China to derecognize US univ after Dalai speech?Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | The Times of India

    NEW DELHI: Is China considering not recognizing a degree from the University of California San Diego ? That's what many of the 3,500 Chinese students there are worried about after Beijing's arch-enemy, the Dalai Lama , delivered the commencement speech at UCSD on Saturday, reported state-run Chinese media. "Chinese students reached by the Global Times said they fear that attending the university may affect their future careers if China's Ministry of Education chooses not to recognize the school's degree," said an article in the state-run news outlet.

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  7. Yoga vs. Physical Therapy: Settling the Debate for Low Back PainRead the original story

    Monday Jun 19 | Newswise

    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. University of Alabama at Birmingham Assistant Professor of Medicine Stefan Kertesz, M.D., recently co-wrote and published an editorial commentary on a new randomized controlled trial focusing on prescribing yoga for low back pain.

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  8. Chemistry of sea spray particles linked for first time to formation processRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | Science Daily

    ... and a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, led the National Science Foundation-supported study. She said its key breakthrough involved showing that the drops sent ...

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  9. Experts Published A Scathing Rebuttal To The Left's Favorite Green Energy StudyRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | The Daily Caller

    A group of researchers have published a scathing rebuttal to a 2015 report claiming the U.S. could run on 100 percent green energy, which they say suffered from "significant shortcomings." The 2015 study led by Stanford University professor Mark Jacobson claimed wind turbines, solar power and hydroelectric dams could power the entire U.S. But 21 researchers published a retort to Jacobson's study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .

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  10. Yoga as good for low back pain as physical therapyRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | Reuters

    Chronic lower back pain is equally likely to improve with yoga classes as with physical therapy, according to a new study. Twelve weeks of yoga lessened pain and improved function in people with low back pain as much as physical therapy sessions over the same period.

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  11. Family of patients with NAFLD and cirrhosis are at increased risk of liver fibrosisRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common disorder characterized by abnormal accumulation of fat in the liver. NAFLD is diagnosed in up to one in three adults and one in 10 children in the United States, and obesity is the greatest known risk factor.

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  12. Occasional Smokers Who Vape Smoke MoreRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | News Max

    Tobacco companies have been selling electronic cigarettes as a way to wean smokers off paper cigarettes, but a new study suggests the strategy could backfire. The report in Preventive Medicine found that young adults who occasionally smoked conventional cigarettes smoked more of them if they also used e-cigarettes battery-powered gadgets that heat liquid nicotine into vapor.

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  13. Fighting global warming and climate change requires a broad energy portfolioRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | Science Daily

    ... and infrastructure realities, renewables won't be the only solution," said Victor, an energy expert at the UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy. Victor and fellow co-author Tynan, who is associate dean of the UC San Diego Jacobs School ...

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  14. Differences in Sea Spray Particle Chemistry Linked to Formation...Read the original story

    Monday Jun 19 | Newswise

    ... and a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, led the National Science Foundation-supported study. She said its key breakthrough involved showing that the drops sent ...

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  15. Transforming Last Night's Leftovers Into Green EnergyRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | Newswise

    In a classic tale of turning trash into treasure, two different processes soon may be the favored dynamic duo to turn food waste into green energy, according to a new Cornell University-led study. Berkeley Lab scientists have demonstrated how floating particles will assemble and synchronize in response to acoustic waves.

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  16. In Sharp Rebuttal, Scientists Squash Hopes for 100 Percent RenewablesRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | Tech Review

    On Monday, a team of prominent researchers sharply critiqued an influential paper arguing that wind, solar, and hydroelectric power could affordably meet most of the nation's energy needs by 2055, saying it contained modeling errors and implausible assumptions that could distort public policy and spending decisions . The rebuttal appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the same journal that ran the original 2015 paper .

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  17. Downward Dog, Doctor's Order: Yoga Could Ease Back PainRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | LiveScience

    To ease low back pain, you may want try a downward dog: A new study suggests that doing yoga may be as effective as physical therapy for reducing low back pain . The study looked at a specific yoga routine designed by experts.

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  18. Failure to AdjustRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 13, 2016 | CFR.org

    Against the backdrop of the U.S. presidential election cycle and the controversy over the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact, Alden shows how the collapse of the consensus on trade has been decades in the making. Using detailed historical research and drawing on his previous experience as a journalist covering the North American Free Trade Agreement and the creation of the World Trade Organization , Alden reveals that U.S. policymakers have long recognized the challenges that Americans would face in the new global economy, but mostly looked the other way.

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  19. Occasional smokers who vape smoke more cigarettesRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 19 | Reuters

    Tobacco companies have been selling electronic cigarettes as a way to wean smokers off paper cigarettes, but a new study suggests the strategy could backfire. The report in Preventive Medicine found that young adults who occasionally smoked conventional cigarettes smoked more of them if they also used e-cigarettes - battery-powered gadgets that heat liquid nicotine into vapor.

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  20. Inexpensive Organic Material Gives Safe Batteries A Longer LifeRead the original story

    Monday Jun 19 | ECNmag

    Modern batteries power everything from cars to cell phones, but they are far from perfect - they catch fire, they perform poorly in cold weather and they have relatively short lifecycles, among other issues. Now researchers from the University of Houston have described a new class of material that addresses many of those concerns in Nature Materials .

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