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Results 1 - 20 of 58 for "u:caes.uga.edu" in Tifton, GA

  1. Blueberry CropRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 16, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    An early spring freeze cost Georgia's blueberry farmers as much as 60 percent of their crop this season, according to Renee Allen, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent for commercial blueberry production. Growers suffered a loss in 2017, too, but were optimistic after plants received the proper number of chill hours for production during this year's colder winter.

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  2. Cotton STEM WorkshopRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 10, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    A select group of Georgia 4-H members learned about cotton production and the crop's global impact as part of a daylong Cotton STEM Workshop held on the University of Georgia Tifton campus on Thursday, July 19. Thirty 4-H members from Georgia's Ben Hill, Berrien, Brooks, Crawford, Decatur, Echols and Turner counties participated in the pilot project. Kane Staines, UGA-Tifton microgin manager, coordinated the program with Melinda Miller, UGA Cooperative Extension 4-H program development coordinator for Extension's Southwest District.

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  3. Young Scholars 2018Read the original story w/Photo

    May 10, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    It's not your typical gear list for summer camp, but it covers just what Georgia high school students needed while they participated in this summer's University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Young Scholars Program. For almost three decades, the CAES Young Scholars Program has paired the college's researchers with high school students to foster students' love of science and introduce them to the breadth of study that forms the foundation of agriculture, Georgia's largest industry.

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  4. Dutta HonoredRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 15, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Bhabesh Dutta, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable plant pathologist, has been named to the first class of Fruit + Vegetable 40 Under 40 Award winners. Great American Media Services, publishers of Fruit Growers News and Vegetable Growers News, give the awards to outstanding young professionals in the nation's fruit and vegetable industry who demonstrate excellent commitments to making their marks through innovation and leadership.

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  5. CantaloupesRead the original story w/Photo

    May 15, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    University of Georgia scientists are assisting in a study to find a cantaloupe variety with less netting on the rind in the hopes that the fruit will be less susceptible to the bacteria or pathogens that settle in the netting on the outside of the fruit. This UGA project is funded by a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant sponsored by the USDA's Specialty Crop Research Initiative.

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  6. College PrepRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 5, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    While it's hard to imagine middle schoolers living on their own or heading off to college, students need to begin to think about their future education and career goals when they're in middle school. Parents should begin asking their children about their intended career paths, interests and postsecondary education aspirations before they transition into high school, according to Breanna Coursey, CAES director of student and employer engagement.

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  7. Scouting SchoolRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 20, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Even in a world of remote-monitoring stations and farm technology, farmers haven't found anything better than the human eye to identify emerging crop problems. Insect scouting - sending people into a field of crops to spot early signs of pest problems - is both a tradition and an art form, and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is committed to making sure Georgia has enough trained scouts to survey the state's fields.

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  8. Postemergence HerbicidesRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 15, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Using postemergence herbicides to control problematic weeds has been recently successful for Georgia cotton farmers, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper. Two to three weeks of steady rainfall prevented many farmers from making postemergence herbicide applications in late May, a pivotal time for cotton plants to establish growth.

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  9. Kudzu BugRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 6, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    A tiny wasp - known as "Paratelenomus saccharalis" - is cutting down kudzu bug populations and Georgia soybean farmers' need to treat for the pest, according to Michael Toews, a University of Georgia entomologist based on the UGA Tifton campus. "Growers used to spray multiple times during the season, and sometimes it would do nothing to suppress the kudzu bug population," Toews said.

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  10. Solar PanelsRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 15, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    This year, two additional solar panels were installed at the Future Farmstead, a water- and energy-efficient research home on the University of Georgia Tifton campus, as part of a project by Eagle Scout Bailey Veeder of Athens, Georgia. Veeder began working at the Future Farmstead when he was a Young Scholar during the summer of 2017.

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  11. Peach CropRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 1, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Last year's summer peach crop was disastrous, but Georgia's peach crop rebounded this summer following colder temperatures in December and January, according to Jeff Cook, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent for Taylor and Peach counties. "We were very optimistic this winter, but then we kind of got our feelings hurt because of that late-season freeze in March.

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  12. Rainy ImpactRead the original story w/Photo

    May 30, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Two consecutive weeks of rainfall in Georgia stunted the growth of the state's peanut crop and created ideal conditions for diseases in vegetable fields, leaving farmers scrambling to decide what to do next. Georgia's peanut and cotton acreage remains in flux due to the inclement weather.

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  13. Pepper WeevilsRead the original story w/Photo

    May 10, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Pepper weevils are such a threat to Georgia's pepper crop that University of Georgia vegetable entomologist David Riley says Georgia farmers and agricultural workers should immediately kill any weevils found on fruit, equipment or clothes. This year's cold winter temperatures helped to wipe out fall vegetable plants like peppers and eggplants that host the weevils.

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  14. Scouting SchoolsRead the original story w/Photo

    May 8, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Two insect scouting schools, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in June, will introduce new scouts to insect monitoring and serve as a review for experienced scouts and farmers. One of the scouting schools will be held on Monday, June 11, at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center.

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  15. PeanutsRead the original story w/Photo

    May 7, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Now is the peak time to plant peanuts in Georgia, according to Cristiane Pilon, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut physiologist. During a research trial on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017, Pilon planted peanuts at three different times: mid-April, mid-May and early June.

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  16. Ratcliffe ScholarsRead the original story w/Photo

    May 7, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Four University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences students will expand their education beyond the university's Athens campus thanks to the legacy of one pioneering agricultural scientist, Thomas Jackson "Jack" Ratcliffe Jr. In its inaugural year, the college's Ratcliffe Scholars Program will give four CAES students $5,000 each to participate in immersive, hands-on educational experiences outside the bounds of a traditional classroom. The Ratcliffe family established the new scholarship in honor of their father and early 20th-century CAES graduate, Thomas Jackson Ratcliffe Jr. Ratcliffe, who was born in 1916, served as a UGA Cooperative Extension agent in Lanier County, Georgia, following his graduation from UGA.

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  17. Double DawgsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 26, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    The University of Georgia's Double Dawgs program is a significant recruiting tool for the university's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences , according to Breanna Coursey, CAES director of student and employer engagement. The recently instituted program enables UGA students to save time and money by earning bachelor's and master's degrees in five years or less.

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  18. UGA-Tifton GraduationRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 25, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    The University of Georgia Tifton campus recognized 32 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences spring and summer graduates at a special ceremony held on Sunday, April 29, at the Tifton Campus Conference Center. One UGA-Tifton student, Jeremy Taylor of Valdosta, Georgia, will receive a master's degree in plant protection and pest management this summer.

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  19. New Pecan EntomologistRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 16, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    New University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan entomologist Angelita Acebes hopes to find more effective, sustainable solutions for Georgia farmers managing pest insects. Since March 1, when she started her new position on the UGA Tifton campus, Acebes has identified the most pressing pest problems for pecan growers, including black and yellow pecan aphids, hickory shuckworms, pecan weevils and ambrosia beetles.

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  20. Watermelon ResearchRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 7, 2018 | Georgia Faces

    Georgia watermelon growers who have a targeted, informed disease management plan for gummy stem blight disease could save money and lessen the environmental impact of producing this favorite summertime fruit. University of Georgia horticulturist Cecilia McGregor, along with fellow UGA scientists Marin Brewer and Bhabesh Dutta, studies the impact of reduced fungicide use through early detection of gummy stem blight in watermelons.

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