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Results 1 - 20 of 203 for "u:livescience.com" in Santa Cruz, CA

  1. Goodnight, Colo! Oldest Gorilla in the US Dies in SleepRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 16 | LiveScience

    Colo the gorilla, the world's oldest known gorilla, died peacefully in her sleep on Jan. 17. She was 60 years old. Here, a photo of Colo taken in 2015.

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  2. Were Egyptian 'Pot Burials' a Symbol of Rebirth?Read the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 17 | Live Science

    Here, the remains of children buried in pots at a cemetery in Adaima, Egypt, dating to the Pre- to Early Dynastic period . Ancient Egyptians who buried their deceased kin in pots may have chosen the burial vessels as symbols of the womb and rebirth, scientists argue in a new paper.

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  3. New Icy Island Forms as Arctic Glacier RetreatsRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 16 | LiveScience

    The island, detected with satellite imagery, is made of loose dirt and rocks deposited by the slow-moving river of ice. Typically, a glacial island like this will erode away after the glacier stops feeding it with new sediment , glaciologist Mauri Pelto wrote in the American Geophysical Union blog , "From a Glacier's Perspective."

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  4. In Images: Amazing Artificial Spider SilkRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 11 | LiveScience

    Past attempts to make spider silk in the lab have led to underwhelming results, such as clumps of unusable spider silk proteins or very low yields. However, the new researchers were able to make large quantities of strong, flexible spider silk by mimicking the conditions inside the spider.

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  5. Strong, Flexible Spider Silk Created in LabRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 11 | LiveScience

    We've built skyscrapers, planes that travel faster than sound and particle colliders a mile below the Earth's surface. Yet in some ways, the humble little house spider has got humans beat: The silken threads spiders use to ensnare prey are amazing feats of natural engineering.

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  6. Polar Bear Body Cam Shows Predator's POVRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 10 | LiveScience

    New footage from a polar bear body cam shows how these ursine inhabitants of the Arctic play, swim and hunt. Just released by the U.S. Geographic Survey, the footage is from a point-of-view camera around the neck of a female polar bear from the southern Beaufort Sea, just north of Alaska.

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  7. Dramatic Man-of-War Takes Top Ocean Art Photography PrizeRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 10 | LiveScience

    Matty Smith won Best of Show in an underwater photography contest for this shot of a Pacific Man-of-War floating in the darkness in Bushrangers Bay, New South Wales, Australia. A dramatic Pacific man-of-war framed against a deep black sea is the subject of one of the winning photos in this year's Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition.

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  8. Ultralight 'Super-Material' Is 10 Times Stronger Than SteelRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 9 | Live Science

    The new super-material is made up of flecks of graphene squished and fused together into a vast, cobwebby network. The fluffy structure, which looks a bit like a psychedelic sea creature, is almost completely hollow; its density is just 5 percent that of ordinary graphene, the researchers said.

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  9. Wild Tarantula Eats a Foot-Long Snake in a FirstRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 9 | Live Science

    When scientists in southern Brazil turned over a rock looking for tarantulas, they came across something they'd never expected: a spider eating a snake. The tarantula, called Grammostola quirogai , was chowing down on the body of an Almaden ground snake .

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  10. In Photos: A Tarantula-Eat-Snake WorldRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 9 | Live Science

    A tarantula chows down on a Almaden ground snake in southern Brazil. Though captive tarantulas have been known to prey on snakes, this is the first time researchers have ever seen a tarantula eating a snake in the wild, researchers reported in December 2016 in the journal Herpetology Notes.

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  11. Wow! Mars Probe Snaps Stunning Photo of Earth and MoonRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jan 6 | Live Science

    This view of Earth and its moon combines two images acquired on Nov. 20, 2016, by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, with brightness adjusted separately for Earth and the moon to show details on both bodies. Relative sizes and distance are correct.

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  12. 'Blackfish' Orca Dies: How Tilikum Compares to Wild CousinsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jan 6 | LiveScience

    Tilikum, a 36-year-old killer whale best known in recent years from the documentary "Blackfish," died today , according to SeaWorld. The male orca was involved in three human deaths during his approximately 34 years in captivity, including the 2010 killing of SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau.

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  13. Zombies Would Wipe Out Humans in Less than 100 DaysRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jan 6 | LiveScience

    A new article in a peer-reviewed student journal finds that the zombie hordes would take Earth's population down to a mere 273 survivors in 100 days. The paper, published in the University of Leicester's Journal of Physics Special Topics, was a fanciful use of the so-called SIR model, which is used in epidemiology to simulate how diseases spread over time.

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  14. Hitler's 'Mein Kampf' Reprint Races Up German Best-Seller ChartRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 3 | LiveScience

    "Mein Kampf" by Adolf Hitler is shown during a press preview of the exhibition "Hitler and the Germans Nation and Crime" at the German Historical Museum on Oct. 13, 2010, in Berlin. The autobiography has sold about 75,000 copies and spent 35 weeks on the German "Der Spiegel" best-seller list in 2016, The New York Times reported .

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  15. Irish Potato Blight Originated in South AmericaRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 3 | Live Science

    The potato blight that killed about a million people in Ireland in the 1840s originated in South America, a new genetic analysis finds. Until now, the origin of the fungus-like blight that devastated potato crops in Ireland and throughout Europe had not been pinned down.

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  16. Uptight Snakes More Likely to StrikeRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 3 | Live Science

    An angry cottonmouth shows off the white lining of its mouth in a defensive display. Though these snakes have a reputation for aggression, only a third attempted to strike during a study in which they were captured, subjected to a blood draw and put in a bucket.

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  17. Scuba Diving? See a Dentist FirstRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 3 | LiveScience

    Vinisha Ranna, BDS, dives near wreckage in Sri Lanka. Ranna, a certified stress-and-rescue diver, is investigating the effect of scuba on the teeth.

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  18. 'Leap Second' Will Make New Year's Eve Just a Little Bit LongerRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Dec 30 | Live Science

    For one tiny heartbeat at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve, a minute will be 61 seconds long. World clocks will officially add a " leap second " at 23 hours, 59 minutes and 59 seconds Coordinated Universal Time , which is the time standard set by highly precise atomic clocks.

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  19. Long-Sought 'Attack' Signal in Type 1 Diabetes IdentifiedRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Dec 27 | Live Science

    In people with type 1 diabetes, the body wages a ruthless campaign of destruction against certain cells in the pancreas because it mistakes them for foreign invaders. Now, one of the long-sought triggers of this assault might have been found, according to a new study from Switzerland.

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  20. Are Mars' Dark Streaks Really Evidence of Liquid Water?Read the original story w/Photo

    Dec 19, 2016 | Live Science

    The detection of hydrated salts within Mars' intriguing, seasonally appearing dark streaks aren't necessarily proof of liquid water, according to a new study. Dark streaks called recurring slope lineae emanate from the walls of Mars' Garni Crater in this image by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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