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Results 1 - 14 of 14 for "u:medicalnewstoday.com" in Mount Sinai, NY

  1. Using ultrasound to detect potential heart attacks and strokes before symptoms ariseRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 14 | Medical News Today

    A study of portable ultrasound carried out in the USA, Canada and India has revealed the potential of this technology for detecting plaques in peripheral arteries that can lead to heart attacks and stroke before symptoms arise, in both developed and developing country settings, allowing preventive treatment in those affected. The study, published in Global Heart , is by Dr Ram Bedi, Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, and Professor Jagat Narula, Editor-in-Chief of Global Heart and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA, and colleagues.

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  2. Disease progression delayed by new drug combination for advanced breast cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 16, 2014 | Medical News Today

    A new combination of cancer drugs delayed disease progression for patients with hormone-receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer , according to a multi-center phase II trial. The findings of the randomized study were presented at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, by Dr. Kerin Adelson, assistant professor of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center and chief quality officer at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven.

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  3. In patients with advanced myelofibrosis, PRM-151 therapy is well toleratedRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 12, 2014 | Medical News Today

    A study that investigated the potential of the compound PRM-151 for reducing progressive bone marrow fibrosis in patients with advanced myelofibrosis has shown initial positive results. Myelofibrosis is a life-threatening bone marrow cancer .

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  4. Autism and gender nonconformity combined present unique challengesRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 5, 2014 | Medical News Today

    The challenges in providing psychotherapy to individuals with autism spectrum disorders who also are struggling with their gender identity are explored in two case studies of high-functioning persons with diagnoses of ASD and gender dysphoria . The authors describe the unique complexities presented by these two diagnoses and offer suggested techniques for helping these individuals explore their gender identities in an article in LGBT Health , a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

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  5. Implanted device shows potential as alternative to warfarin for...Read the original story w/Photo

    Nov 17, 2014 | Medical News Today

    Vivek Y. Reddy, M.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and colleagues examined the long-term efficacy and safety, compared to warfarin, of a device to achieve left atrial appendage closure in patients with atrial fibrillation . The study appears in JAMA , a cardiovascular disease theme issue.

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  6. Engineered cells reveal changes associated with learning, memory and rewardRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 28, 2014 | Medical News Today

    Scientists have created cells with fluorescent dyes that change color in response to specific neurochemicals. By implanting these cells into living mammalian brains, they have shown how neurochemical signaling changes as a food reward drives learning, they report in Nature Methods online.

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  7. Shopping for an egg donor: Is beauty, brains, or health most important?Read the original story w/Photo

    Oct 22, 2014 | Medical News Today

    When it comes to picking an egg donor, until recent years, recipients tended to prefer someone with a similar appearance. Donor trait choices are changing, though, and which traits are now more preferable and why is the focus of "Beauty, Brains or Health: Trends in Ovum Recipient Preferences," an article published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. 2 comments

  8. Study indicates need for more obstetric quality of care measures at hospitalsRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 14, 2014 | Medical News Today

    In an analysis of data on more than 100,000 deliveries and term newborns from New York City hospitals, rates for certain quality indicators and complications for mothers and newborns varied substantially between hospitals and were not correlated with performance measures designed to assess hospital-level obstetric quality of care, according to a study in JAMA . Severe maternal complications occurs in about 60,000 women annually in the United States, and 1 in 10 term infants experience neonatal complications.

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  9. Does diabetes start in the brain?Read the original story w/Photo

    Oct 10, 2014 | Medical News Today

    Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, make the case that rising levels of certain molecules in the brain provide early signs of diabetes. They publish their findings in the journal Cell Metabolism .

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  10. New genomic editing methods produce better disease models from...Read the original story w/Photo

    Sep 10, 2014 | Medical News Today

    Highly valuable for modeling human diseases and discovering novel drugs and cell-based therapies, induced pluripotent stem cells are created by reprogramming an adult cell from a patient to obtain patient-specific stem cells. Due to genetic variation, however, iPSCs may differ from a patient's diseased cells, and researchers are now applying new and emerging genomic editing tools to human disease modeling, as described in a comprehensive Review article published in Stem Cells and Development , a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

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  11. Substance abuse in developing countries needs to be addressed by global public health objectivesRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 19, 2014 | Medical News Today

    Substance addiction is a large and growing problem for developing societies. A new study that surveyed reports on modalities for treating addiction and their effectiveness in the developing world calls on policymakers to use this information to support the design of programs that meet known population needs.

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  12. Global public health objectives need to address substance abuse in developing countriesRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 18, 2014 | Medical News Today

    Substance addiction is a large and growing problem for developing societies. A new study that surveyed reports on modalities for treating addiction and their effectiveness in the developing world calls on policymakers to use this information to support the design of programs that meet known population needs.

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  13. LGBT couples have more options, face new legal issues with advances in assisted reproductionRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 5, 2014 | Medical News Today

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals who want to conceive a child may face the same problems as some of their heterosexual and cisgendered peers, such as reduced fertility, but in addition they often face additional physiological and legal challenges to become parents.

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  14. Why ancient men and women had atherosclerosisRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 1, 2014 | Medical News Today

    Examining the remarkably preserved mummies of five ancient cultures, the Horus mummy research team discovered atherosclerosis was present in humans long before we acquired modern lifestyles.

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