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Results 1 - 20 of 38 for "u:eurekalert.org" in La-Jolla, CA

  1. Is the next big step in cancer therapy personalized vaccines?Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Oct 11 | EurekAlert!

    UC San Diego Health and La Jolla Institute launch clinical trial harnessing an individual's immune system in a syringe IMAGE: Ezra Cohen, MD, UC San Diego Health physician scientist, administered the first-of-its-kind personalized cancer vaccine to Tamara Strauss, while Aaron Miller, MD, PhD, UC San Diego Health physician scientist, Tamara's... view Tamara Strauss has been living with high-grade, stage IV pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer for more than three years. Current treatments, although effective for her, are highly toxic.

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  2. Study identifies gene that makes gentle touch feel painful after injuryRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Oct 9 | EurekAlert!

    VIDEO: NIH funded studies found that the PIEZO2 gene may control the skin's reaction to injuries, like sunburns, that make gentle touches feel painful. view Ever wonder why things that normally feel gentle, like putting on soft shirts, are painful after a sunburn? In a study of four patients with a rare genetic disorder, NIH researchers found that PIEZO2, a gene previously shown to control our sense of our bodies in space and gentle touch, may also be responsible for tactile allodynia: the skin's reaction to injury that makes normally gentle touches feel painful.

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  3. Tracking a killerRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Oct 9 | EurekAlert!

    A major cause of human disability and death throughout the world, sepsis is a condition that begins with an infection, progresses rapidly and can set off a chain of effects that result in multiple organ failure and irreparable damage to the body. Because of the condition's rapid onset, physicians must respond immediately to the symp-toms with broad-spectrum antibiotics for infection, drugs to combat inflammation and, in the more critical cases, vasopressors to manage shock.

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  4. Zika virus strips immune cells of their identityRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 9, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: Neighboring infected and uninfected human macrophages during a Zika virus infection in a lab dish. Zika virus is labeled red; Macrophage nuclei are labeled blue.

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  5. On the horizon: An acne vaccineRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 28, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    A new study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology reports important steps that have been taken towards the development of an acne vaccine. The investigators demonstrated for the first time that antibodies to a toxin secreted from bacteria in acne vulgaris can reduce inflammation in human acne lesions.

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  6. Researchers find elusive source of most abundant immune cellRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 27, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    Discovery of human neutrophil progenitor opens the door for new therapeutic targets and could serve as an important biomarker for early cancer detection IMAGE: The top left cells represent neutrophil progenitors and the right bottom ones are fully differentiated neutrophils. The color of nucleus matches the color on the viSNE map in the... view LA JOLLA, CA--Neutrophils--short-lived, highly mobile and versatile--outnumber all other immune cells circulating through the blood stream.

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  7. Physical therapy after a fall may help reduce emergency department revisitsRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 21, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    Physical therapy in the emergency department after a fall may help reduce future fall-related visits to the emergency department Falls are the leading cause of illness and death among Americans aged 65 and older. In 2014, some 2.8 million older adults visited the emergency department for a fall-related injury.

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  8. Multi-million-dollar grant to grow kidney researchRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 20, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: This is Ravindra L. Mehta, MD, nephrologist and professor of medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine. view Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine have received renewed grant funding from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to expand research into the areas of acute kidney failure and acute kidney injuries.

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  9. New strategy for cancer therapy spells double trouble for tumorsRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 24, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    July 25, 2018 - Scientists at Scripps Research have uncovered a new strategy to kill tumors, including some triple-negative breast cancers, without harming healthy cells, a discovery that could lead to more ways to treat tumors while reducing side effects. The study, published recently in Nature Communications , shows that a molecule in cells, called Rad52, repairs special kinds of damaged DNA that accumulate in some cancers.

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  10. A promising approach to translational research on stem cells for Parkinson's diseaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 22, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    A major factor underlying Parkinson's Disease pathology is the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, and thus current therapies often aim to restore dopamine signaling. However, these treatments are not curative.

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  11. Human Vaccines Project and Seqirus partner to advance universal flu vaccine researchRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 27, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    The Human Vaccines Project , a nonprofit public-private partnership focused on decoding the immune system to improve human health, and Seqirus, a global leader in the prevention of influenza, announced today that Seqirus is joining the Project's Universal Influenza Vaccine Initiative . Seqirus, owned by CSL Limited, has been on the front line of influenza vaccine development and pandemic preparedness for more than a century, pioneering new technologies for rapidly producing influenza vaccines.

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  12. Scripps Research chemists design 'miniecosystems' to test drug functionRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 17, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    June 18, 2018 -Scripps Research scientists have solved a major problem in chemistry and drug development by using droplet-sized 'miniecosystems' to quickly see if a molecule can function as a potential therapeutic. As they report today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the new method will let researchers save critical time and funding by simultaneously testing how drug candidates bind to their cellular targets and alter cell function.

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  13. Chemists achieve major milestone of synthesis: Remote chiral inductionRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 17, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    June 18, 2018 - Chemists at Scripps Research have addressed one of the most formidable challenges in synthetic chemistry by inventing a method for "enantioselective remote meta-CH activation," which enables the making of chiral molecules that were previously difficult or impossible to synthesize. The method, reported today in Nature , is likely to be adopted widely for the making of prospective drugs and other chemical products.

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  14. Antibody blocks inflammation, protects mice from hardened arteries and liver diseaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 5, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    Study uncovers new potential therapeutic approach for a number of diseases linked to inflammation, including atherosclerosis, aortic stenosis and hepatic steatosis IMAGE: The aorta of a mouse model of atherosclerosis on a high-fat diet for 12 months has significantly more plaques than the aorta of the same type of... view Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine discovered that they can block inflammation in mice with a naturally occurring antibody that binds oxidized phospholipids , molecules on cell surfaces that get modified by inflammation. Even while on a high-fat diet, the antibody protected the mice from arterial plaque formation, hardening of the arteries and liver disease, and prolonged their lives.

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  15. Use of ibuprofen and similar NSAIDs may shorten life of patientsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 30, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    Ibuprofen, aspirin, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications are among the most commonly utilized medications in the United States. Primarily for treating pain, inflammation, and preventing cardiovascular disease, NSAIDs' promising anti-cancer properties have been highlighted by a growing body of data in recent years.

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  16. All of Us Research Program ushers in new era for technology-driven citizen scienceRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 30, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    Scripps Translational Science Institute working with Walgreens, Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and other partners to enroll volunteers to use mobile technologies to study their own health La Jolla, CA-On May 6, a nationwide consortium led by the National Institutes of Health will launch the All of Us Research Program, a pioneering research project that uses advanced technologies and engages participants as citizen-scientists to embark on a new era of health science and precision medicine. The Scripps Translational Science Institute will head efforts to engage direct volunteers in the program through partnerships with Walgreens, Blue Cross Blue Shield Association , National Blood Collaborative, Quest Diagnostics and other organizations.

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  17. Long-sought structure of telomerase paves way for new drugs for aging, cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 24, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    More than 30 years ago, when University of California, Berkeley researchers discovered telomerase - an enzyme that lengthens chromosome ends and prevents them from fraying enough to kill a cell - speculation ran wild about its role in aging and cancer, setting off a full-court press to produce drugs to activate or block the enzyme. While neither telomerase-based anti-aging drugs, touted as a "fountain of youth," nor anticancer drugs have yet appeared, the publication today by UC Berkeley scientists of the first detailed picture of the molecular structure of human telomerase should jump-start that effort, allowing more targeted drug screens and intelligent design of new drugs.

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  18. Healthy red blood cells owe their shape to muscle-like structuresRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 3, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: The Fowler lab discovered that myosin can bind actin to exert tension on the red blood cell membrane. This tension supports the function of red blood cells by... view LA JOLLA, CA - April 4, 2018 - Red blood cells are on a wild ride.

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  19. Bystander T cells can steal the show in resolving inflammationRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 22, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: The image shows the infiltration of islet-specific CD8+ T cells and non-islet-specific CD8+ T cells in an islet of Langerhans in a mouse pancreas. The... view LA JOLLA, CA--In Type 1 diabetes the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys insulin-producing pancreatic cells, leaving patients dependent on lifelong insulin injections.

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  20. Non-psychoactive cannabis ingredient could help addicts stay cleanRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 22, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    A preclinical study in rats has shown that there might be value in using a non-psychoactive and non-addictive ingredient of the Cannabis sativa plant to reduce the risk of relapse among recovering drug and alcohol addicts. The study's findings inform the ongoing debate about the possible medical benefits of non-psychoactive cannabinoids, and the way that these may be used as therapeutics.

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