Ithaca Newswire

Ithaca Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Ithaca, NY.

Results 1 - 20 of 109 for "u:newswise.com" in Ithaca, NY

  1. Nonnative zooplankton species found in Lake ErieRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Aug 10 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Cornell University aquatic taxonomists have detected two new nonnative zooplankton species in the Great Lakes their fourth such discovery in the past two years. After 10 years of finding no new invasive zooplankton in the Great Lakes, discovering several in recent years is significant.

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  2. This small molecule could hold the key to promising HIV treatmentsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 8 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. New research provides details of how the structure of the HIV-1 virus is assembled, findings that offer potential new targets for treatment. The study , authored by a multi-institutional team led by Cornell University researchers, was published in the journal Nature .

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  3. Support Increases When Opioid 'Safe Consumption Sites' Called 'Overdose Prevention Sites'Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 8 | Newswise

    "Safe consumption sites," where people can use pre-obtained drugs with medically trained personnel on hand to treat overdoses, garner higher public support when they are called "overdose prevention sites," according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The researchers, in a study published on August 8 in the American Journal of Public Health , surveyed representative national samples of Americans and found that only 29 percent of respondents were in favor of "safe consumption sites," but 45 percent supported them when the term "overdose prevention sites" was used instead.

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  4. A Kernel of Promise in Popcorn-Powered RobotsRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Aug 2 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Cornell University researchers have discovered how to power simple robots with a novel substance that, when heated, can expand more than 10 times in size, change its viscosity by a factor of 10 and transition from regular to highly irregular granules with surprising force. " Popcorn-Driven Robotic Actuators ," a recent paper co-authored by Steven Ceron, mechanical engineering doctoral student, and Kirstin H. Petersen , assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, examines how popcorn's unique qualities can power inexpensive robotic devices that grip, expand or change rigidity.

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  5. Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Dissatisfied with Medical CareRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 1 | Newswise

    An estimated 5 million to 6 million women in the United States suffer from PCOS, but many have yet to be diagnosed. PCOS affects 7 percent to 10 percent of women of reproductive age, making it the most common cause of infertility.

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  6. 'Cornell AgriTech' reflects influence in food, ag innovationRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 1 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences announced Aug. 1 the renaming of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station to Cornell AgriTech. Agriculture and food are multibillion-dollar industries in New York, and the name change underscores the value Cornell AgriTech brings to improving the health of the people, environment and economy of the state and beyond.

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  7. Astronomers assemble 'light-fingerprints' to unveil mysteries of the cosmosRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 31 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Earthbound detectives rely on fingerprints to solve their cases; now astronomers can do the same, using "light-fingerprints" instead of skin grooves to uncover the mysteries of exoplanets. Cornell University researchers have created a reference catalog using calibrated spectra and geometric albedos - the light reflected by a surface - of 19 of the most diverse bodies in our solar system.

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  8. Averting Toxic Chats: Computer Model Predicts When Online Conversations Turn SourRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 24 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. The internet offers the potential for constructive dialogue and cooperation, but online conversations too often degenerate into personal attacks. In hopes that those attacks can be averted, Cornell University researchers have created a model to predict which civil conversations might take a turn and derail.

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  9. New Study Finds Police-Related Fatalities May Occur Twice as Often as ReportedRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 24 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. According to a new study led by a Cornell University researcher, an average of nearly three men in the United States are killed by police use of deadly force every day. This accounts for 8 percent of all homicides with adult male victims twice as many as identified in official statistics.

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  10. Alumna J. Meejin Yoon to return as first female dean of Cornell's...Read the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jul 24 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. J. Meejin Yoon, B.Arch. '95, will return to Cornell as the next dean of the College of Architecture, Art and Planning, Provost Michael Kotlikoff announced July 24. Yoon is the first woman named to the position since the college was formed in 1896.

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  11. Glowing Bacteria on Deep-Sea Fish Shed Light on Evolution, 'Third Type' of SymbiosisRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jul 18 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. You may recognize the anglerfish from its dramatic appearance in the hit animated film Finding Nemo , as it was very nearly the demise of clownfish Marlin and blue-tang fish Dory. It lives most of its life in total darkness more than 1,000 meters below the ocean surface.

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  12. Emotional robot lets you feel how it's 'feeling'Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jul 16 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Cornell University researchers have developed a prototype of a robot that can express "emotions" through changes in its outer surface. The robot's skin covers a grid of texture units whose shapes change based on the robot's feelings.

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  13. Tiny Fern Holds Big Promise for Sustainable Agriculture, Sinks Carbon DioxideRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 11, 2018 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. A tiny fern with each leaf the size of a gnat may provide global impact for sinking atmospheric carbon dioxide, fixing nitrogen in agriculture and shooing pesky insects from crops. The fern's full genome has been sequenced by a Cornell University and Boyce Thompson Institute scientist and his colleagues around the world, as reported in the journal Nature Plants.

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  14. Bank Network Shifts Signaled Financial Crisis - and May Prevent AnotherRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 10, 2018 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Ever since the devastating financial crisis of 2008, researchers have been probing the financial markets to understand what went wrong and how to prevent another crippling recession. A Cornell University statistician and his colleagues have found some answers to those questions through analyzing the crisis by mapping out whether and how two specific networks interacted as the crisis evolved, rather than looking at the financial markets' networks one at a time.

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  15. Ukrainian moth may provide hope against monarch-killing vineRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 10, 2018 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Pale and black swallow-wort are rapidly invading fields and forests across the Northeast, including New York, but a moth from the Ukraine holds promise to keep the weed in check. The larvae of Hypena opulenta feed exclusively on the leaves of pale and black swallow-wort, and after years of research to verify H. opulenta's safety to ecosystems, the moth was approved for field release by the United States Department of Agriculture in August 2017.

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  16. New rapid test aims to get swimmers back in NYS park waters fasterRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 5, 2018 | Newswise

    Ruth Richardson and members of her lab are testing a new water-monitoring technology that, if approved by New York state, could drastically reduce the time state park swim areas must close when water is suspected of being unswimmable. Media Note: Images and video of Ruth Richardson's research and members of her lab testing a new water-monitoring technology can be viewed and downloaded here: .

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  17. The Gender Bias of Names: Surnames Standing Solo Gives Men AdvantageRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 2, 2018 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. When talking about famous people, do you say "Darwin" but "Marie Curie?" Dickens but Emily Dickinson? Shakespeare but Jane Austen? What's in a name or part of a name matters. In new research, Cornell University psychologists find that study participants, on average, were more than twice as likely to call male professionals even fictional ones by their last name only, compared to equivalent female professionals.

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  18. Scientists sic samurai wasps on stink bugsRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 2, 2018 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. "Samurai Wasps vs. Stink Bugs" is not the title of the latest Avengers film. But it does describe new efforts by Cornell University scientists to control a household nuisance and agricultural pest.

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  19. 'Workhorse' Lithium Battery Could Be More Powerful Thanks to New DesignRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 25, 2018 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Cornell University chemical engineering professor Lynden Archer believes there needs to be a battery technology "revolution" and thinks that his lab has fired one of the first shots. "What we have now [in lithium-ion battery technology] is actually at the limits of its capabilities," said Archer.

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  20. Why Being Left-Handed Matters for Mental Health TreatmentRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 18, 2018 | Newswise

    ITHACA, N.Y. Treatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population, according to a radical new model of emotion in the brain. Since the 1970s, hundreds of studies have suggested that each hemisphere of the brain is home to a specific type of emotion.

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