Davis Newswire

Davis Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Davis, CA.

Results 1 - 20 of 86 for "u:eurekalert.org" in Davis, CA

  1. How much drought can a forest take?Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 18 | EurekAlert!

    Why do some trees die in a drought and others don't? And how can we predict where trees are most likely to die in future droughts? Scientists from the University of California, Davis, and colleagues examined those questions in a study published in the journal Ecology Letters . Using climate data and aerial tree mortality surveys conducted by the U.S. Forest Service during four years of extreme drought in California, they found that when a drought hits the region, trees growing in areas that are already dry are most susceptible.

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  2. New tools will drive greater understanding of wheat genesRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jan 15 | EurekAlert!

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists have developed a much-needed genetic resource that will greatly accelerate the study of gene functions in wheat. The resource, a collection of wheat seeds with more than 10 million sequenced and carefully catalogued genetic mutations, is freely available to wheat breeders and researchers, and is already aiding in the development of wheat plants with improved traits.

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  3. Maternal micronutrients, nurturing environment boost child developmentRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Jan 15 | EurekAlert!

    Maternal micronutrient supplements during pregnancy and a strong nurturing environment result in measurably greater child development and cognitive ability at age 9-12 IMAGE: This is a child-development expert from the Summit Institute of Development assessing the cognition of an Indonesian schoolgirl. view more Mataram, Indonesia / Toronto, Canada: Mothers who take multi-micronutrient supplements during pregnancy can add the equivalent of up to one full year of schooling to a child's cognitive abilities at age 9-12, says a new study published today.

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  4. Arabica coffee genome sequencedRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Jan 12 | EurekAlert!

    VIDEO: This video tells the story of the first public sequencing of the Arabica coffee genome, using the Geisha variety, by UC Davis researchers. It was shot primarily at Good... view more The first public genome sequence for Coffea arabica , the species responsible for more than 70 percent of global coffee production, was released today by researchers at the University of California, Davis.

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  5. Reef fish that conquer fear of sharks may help control excess algaeRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 11 | EurekAlert!

    If there was a top-rated restaurant in a dangerous part of the city, chances are some brave souls would be willing to risk it all for a delicious meal. So it goes with coral reef fish dining on algae in French Polynesia, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

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  6. Traffic fatalities decline in states with medical marijuana lawsRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 19, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    States that enacted medical marijuana laws, on average, experienced reductions in traffic fatalities, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Overall, states that passed medical marijuana laws saw an 11 percent reduction in traffic fatalities, on average, after enacting the laws, and had 26 percent lower rates of traffic fatalities compared with states without the laws.

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  7. Public wheat breeder consortium to be developed by USDA grantRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 18, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    Texas A&M AgriLife Research's wheat genetic and breeding programs will have genes in play when a multi-state, multi-agency project establishes a nationally coordinated consortium to advance wheat yields. The Wheat Coordinated Agricultural Project, titled "Validation, characterization and deployment of QTL for grain yield components in wheat," is a five-year project jointly funded by U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture and International Wheat Yield Partnership.

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  8. Against the tide: A fish adapting quickly to lethal levels of pollutionRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 12, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    Evolution is working hard to rescue some urban fish from a lethal, human-altered environment, according to a new study published Dec. 9 in the journal Science . Researchers from the University of California, Davis and the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science conducted the study.

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  9. Mass oyster die-off in San Francisco related to atmospheric riversRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 12, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: Oysters cling to the shoreline at China Camp State Park in San Francisco Bay before a 2011 mass die-off. view more Atmospheric rivers contributed to a mass die-off of wild Olympia oysters in north San Francisco Bay in 2011, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis and the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, or NERR.

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  10. UC Davis joins national effort on links between health and exerciseRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 12, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    We know that exercise is good for you. But why, and how? The National Institutes of Health today announced a six-year, $170 million nationwide project to dig deep into the molecular changes that come from physical activity, and how they influence health.

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  11. Against the tide: A fish adapts quickly to lethal levels of pollutionRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 7, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    Evolution is working hard to rescue some urban fish from a lethal, human-altered environment, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, and published Dec. 9 in the journal Science . While environmental change is outpacing the rate of evolution for many other species, Atlantic killifish living in four polluted East Coast estuaries turn out to be remarkably resilient.

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  12. Transforming plant cells from generalists to specialistsRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 5, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    As a growing plant extends its roots into the soil, the new cells that form at their tips assume different roles, from transporting water and nutrients to sensing gravity. A new study points to one way by which these newly-formed cells, which all contain the same DNA, take on their special identities.

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  13. Bailey, Borwein, Mattingly, and Wightwick to receive 2017 AMS Conant PrizeRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 1, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: David Bailey , Jonathan Borwein , Andrew Mattingly , and Glenn Wightwick are the winners of the 2017 AMS Conant Prize. view more Credit: Top left: Bailey, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab; top right: Borwein, Australian Academy of Science; bottom left: Mattingly, CJ Butler, IBM Research-Australia; and lower right: Wightwick, Joanne Saad.

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  14. Treatment significantly reduces chemotherapy-induced hearing loss in childrenRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 1, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    Investigators from Children's Hospital Los Angeles and 37 other Children's Oncology Group hospitals in the U.S. and Canada have determined that sodium thiosulfate prevents cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children and adolescents with cancer. Results of this randomized, controlled, phase 3 study, called ACCL0431, have been published in the early online edition of Lancet Oncology .

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  15. Researchers tweak enzyme 'assembly line' to improve antibioticsRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 28, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    Researchers from North Carolina State University have discovered a way to make pinpoint changes to an enzyme-driven "assembly line" that will enable scientists to improve or change the properties of existing antibiotics as well as create designer compounds. The work is the first to efficiently manipulate which building blocks the enzyme selects in the act of synthesizing erythromycin, an important antibiotic.

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  16. Scientists design first reserve network balancing fishing benefits, species protectionRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 16, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: A team led by scientists from the Smithsonian's Marine Conservation Program report in the journal Conservation Letters Nov. 17 that they have designed a model network of marine reserves off... view more For the first time, Smithsonian researchers and collaborators have designed a marine reserve network to protect species threatened by overfishing while boosting fishing yields on nearby fishing grounds, resolving a long-standing global "conserve or catch" conflict in marine conservation efforts.

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  17. CRF to launch new journal focusing on structural heart diseaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 10, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    November 11, 2016 - The Cardiovascular Research Foundation announced that it will launch a new international journal focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of structural heart disease and the importance of the heart team in managing these disorders. Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team will publish its first issue in late Spring 2017 with submissions opening in early 2017.

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  18. Why do seabirds eat plastic? The answer stinksRead the original story

    Nov 8, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    Not in the case of ocean-faring birds that are sometimes found with bellies full of plastic. But very little research examines why birds make the mistake of eating plastic in the first place.

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  19. The fate of Neanderthal genesRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 7, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    The Neanderthals disappeared about 30,000 years ago, but little pieces of them live on in the form of DNA sequences scattered through the modern human genome. A new study by geneticists at the University of California, Davis, shows why these traces of our closest relatives are slowly being removed by natural selection.

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  20. Evolution purged many Neanderthal genes from human genomeRead the original story

    Nov 7, 2016 | EurekAlert!

    Neanderthal genetic material is found in only small amounts in the genomes of modern humans because, after interbreeding, natural selection removed large numbers of weakly deleterious Neanderthal gene variants, according to a study by Ivan Juric and colleagues at the University of California, Davis, published November 8th, 2016 in PLOS Genetics . Humans and Neanderthals interbred tens of thousands of years ago, but today, Neanderthal DNA makes up only 1-4% of the genomes of modern non-African people. 2 comments

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