Cold Spring Harbor Newswire

Cold Spring Harbor Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Cold Spring Harbor, NY.

Results 1 - 16 of 16 for "u:medicalnewstoday.com" in Cold Spring Harbor, NY

  1. Bipolar, autism, and schizophrenia might share genetic originRead the original story w/Photo

    May 6, 2016 | Medical News Today

    A new, in-depth genetic study, published in JAMA Psychiatry , finds a potential link between bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and autism. Although the findings are tentative, they open the door to new avenues of investigation.

    Comment?

  2. Novel syndrome resulting from multiple genomic lesionsRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 2, 2016 | Medical News Today

    Although genomic testing can be useful for clinical diagnosis, most patients have no obvious genomic changes despite a strong indication of a genetic condition. In a paper published in the March issue of Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies , researchers from the US, Turkey, and the Netherlands describe a rare new syndrome likely arising from the dual contribution of two genomic abnormalities previously individually associated with clinical pathologies.

    Comment?

  3. Novel gene variants identified in male breast cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 2, 2016 | Medical News Today

    Male breast cancer is a very rare tumor type, occurring in just 1% of all breast cancer cases, and the underlying genetic causes and treatment of MBC is not well understood. In a paper published in the March issue of Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies , researchers from Italy and the U.S. describe novel genetic variants found in a hormone receptor positive MBC patient, that are distinct from previously identified genetic variants found in ten MBC cases.

    Comment?

  4. Unusual drug generates exciting results in mouse models of metastatic breast cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 23, 2015 | Medical News Today

    A doctor treating a patient with a potentially fatal metastatic breast tumor would be very pleased to find, after administering a round of treatment, that the primary tumor had undergone a change in character - from aggressive to static, and no longer shedding cells that can colonize distant organs of the body. Indeed, most patients with breast and other forms of cancer who succumb to the illness do so because of the cancer's unstoppable spread.

    Comment?

  5. Discovery of X-linked intellectual disability syndrome is aided by web toolsRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 4, 2015 | Medical News Today

    It's a genetic detective story with a distinct 21st-century flavor. A geneticist from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in the United States has used powerful internet and social media tools to find doctors and researchers in nine U.S. states and eight other nations to help him confirm, document and describe in precise clinical detail a new genetic syndrome in young boys that he first came across five years ago.

    Comment?

  6. First direct evidence for synaptic plasticity in fruit fly brainRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 3, 2015 | Medical News Today

    Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have resolved a decades-long debate about how the brain is modified when an animal learns. Using newly developed tools for manipulating specific populations of neurons, the researchers have for the first time observed direct evidence of synaptic plasticity -- changes in the strength of connections between neurons -- in the fruit fly brain while flies are learning.

    Comment?

  7. Unassuming 'Swiss Army knife'-like protein key to new cancer drug's therapeutic actionRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 2, 2015 | Medical News Today

    When preliminary tests show that a new drug has remarkable effectiveness against a lethal illness, everyone wants to know how it works. Often, a mechanism of action is hard to pin down, but when it can be, a candidate drug's chances increase.

    Comment?

  8. Introducing the mighty Panoramix -- defender of genomesRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 16, 2015 | Medical News Today

    Protein named for comic book hero is no joke: It guides gene-silencing machinery to sites of havoc-causing transposons The piwi-RNA pathway is vital to genome integrity and the wellbeing of offspring. This image, from prior research in the Hannon Lab, shows a developing fruit fly egg chamber in which several blue-colored 'nurse cells' that support the egg are prominent.

    Comment?

  9. Approach or buzz off: Brain cells in fruit fly hold secret to individual odor preferencesRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 7, 2015 | Medical News Today

    Responding appropriately to the smell of food or the scent of danger can mean life or death to a fruit fly, and dedicated circuits in the insect's brain are in place to make sure the fly gets it right. In studies designed to better understand how the brain processes information, scientists led by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Associate Professor Glenn Turner have identified an important component in these circuits: the point at which incoming sensory information begins to be transformed into a neural signal that instructs a fly's response.

    Comment?

  10. From Molecular Case Studies: Genomics of exceptional responder to NOTCH inhibitorRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 7, 2015 | Medical News Today

    Normal T-cell development requires Notch signaling but hyperactivity can lead to cancer . Drugs that inhibit Notch, such as gamma-secretase inhibitors , are currently being tested in different cancer types but clinical remission has yet to be reported.

    Comment?

  11. Research connects specific variations in RNA splicing with breast cancer causationRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 1, 2015 | Medical News Today

    Researchers have identified cellular changes that may play a role in converting normal breast cells into tumors. Targeting these changes could potentially lead to therapies for some forms of breast cancer .

    Comment?

  12. Genetic analysis supports prediction that spontaneous rare mutations cause half of autism casesRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 23, 2015 | Medical News Today

    A team led by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory this week publishes in PNAS a new analysis of data on the genetics of autism spectrum disorder . One commonly held theory is that autism results from the chance combinations of commonly occurring gene mutations, which are otherwise harmless.

    Comment?

  13. Scientists sequence genome of worm that can regrow body parts, seeking stem cell insightsRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 22, 2015 | Medical News Today

    Tourists spending a recuperative holiday on the Italian coast may be envious of the regenerative abilities of locally found flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Named for its discovery near the Italian beach town of Lignano Sabbiadoro, this tiny worm can regenerate almost its whole body following an injury, and researchers have long been trying to understand how it's able to pull off this trick.

    Comment?

  14. A step ahead of cancer cells: Important insights into resistance buildingRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 15, 2015 | Medical News Today

    BRD4 inhibitors are among the most promising new agents in cancer therapy that are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In a study published in NATURE , a team of researchers at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology and Boehringer Ingelheim in Vienna reveals how leukemia cells can evade the deadly effects of BRD4 inhibition.

    Comment?

  15. Mathematical 'Gingko trees' reveal mutations in single cells that characterize diseasesRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 8, 2015 | Medical News Today

    Seemingly similar cells often have significantly different genomes. This is often true of cancer cells, for example, which may differ one from another even within a small tumor sample, as genetic mutations within the cells spread in staccato-like bursts.

    Comment?

  16. Surprised? Cholinergic neurons send broadcasts enabling us to learn from the unexpectedRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 28, 2015 | Medical News Today

    When a large combat unit, widely dispersed in dense jungle, goes to battle, no single soldier knows precisely how his actions are affecting the unit's success or failure. But in modern armies, every soldier is connected via an audio link that can instantly receive broadcasts - reporting both positive and negative surprises - based on new intelligence.

    Comment?

Cold Spring Harbor Job Listings
View or post Cold Spring Harbor job listings on Topix.
Cold Spring Harbor Real Estate
News, listings, and foreclosures in Cold Spring Harbor from Topix.
Cold Spring Harbor Mortgages
Find mortgage rates in Cold Spring Harbor on Topix.