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Results 1 - 13 of 13 for "u:washingtonpost.com" in Bismarck, ND

  1. Federal judge rejects request to block Dakota Access pipeline - for nowRead the original story

    Feb 13, 2017 | The Washington Post

    Heavy equipment is seen at a site where sections of the Dakota Access pipeline were being buried near the town of St. Anthony in Morton County, N.D. in 2016. A District of Columbia federal judge on Monday turned down a request to temporarily block construction on the Dakota Access pipeline, saying there would not be any risk of immediate harm until oil starts flowing.

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  2. Dakota AccessRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 31, 2017 | The Washington Post

    Construction continues on the Dakota Access Pipeline near the town of Cannon Ball, N.D., in October. The acting secretary of the Army has instructed the Army Corps of Engineers to provide the final permit needed to complete the Dakota Access pipeline, according to two North Dakota GOP lawmakers who support the project.

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  3. Army Corp directed to approve Dakota Access pipeline easement, senator saysRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 31, 2017 | The Washington Post

    In this Oct. 10, 2016, file photo, Law enforcement officers, left, drag a person from a protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline, near the town of St. Anthony in rural Morton County, N.D. North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven said Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, that the Acting Secretary of the Army has directed the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed with an easement necessary to complete the Dakota Access pipeline. BISMARCK, N.D. - The Army Corps of Engineers was ordered to allow construction of the Dakota Access pipeline to proceed under a disputed Missouri River crossing, North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven said on Tuesday, the latest twist in a months-long legal battle over the $3.8 billion project.

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  4. 4The Latest: Crowd fills library for public forum on pipelineRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 28, 2016 | The Washington Post

    A standing-room only crowd has filled a library in Bismarck, North Dakota, during a public forum about tribal opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline. The Bismarck Tribune reports that Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault joined tribal youth during the meeting sponsored by the Dakota Resource Council.

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  5. Dakota Access pipeline protesters ordered to leave, but no one wants to enforce the banRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 28, 2016 | The Washington Post

    A person walks a horse past the Oceti Sakowin camp in a snow storm during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. BISMARCK, N.D. - Government orders for protesters of the Dakota Access pipeline to leave federal land could have little immediate effect on the encampment where scores of people have been gathered for months to oppose the $3.8 billion project.

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  6. A Dakota pipeline's last standRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 25, 2016 | The Washington Post

    An encampment at the protest against the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation near Cannon Ball, N.D. And that's what the Standing Rock Sioux and its allies in the environmental and activist movements say they are doing: using Lake Oahe in North Dakota as a place to take a stand by setting up camps and blocking roads in order to block the controversial $3.7 billion Dakota Access pipeline. Their confrontations with police - who have responded with water cannons, pepper spray and rubber bullets - have steered attention to the 1,170-mile long oil pipeline project and its owner, Energy Transfer Partners.

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  7. Anti-pipeline protesters demonstrate on Thanksgiving DayRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 24, 2016 | The Washington Post

    Law enforcement stand atop Turtle Hill on the Cannonball Ranch watching as protesters stand at the base while others stand across the water on Thursday afternoon. Nov. 24, 2016 in southern Morton County, N.D..

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  8. Police use water cannons on Dakota Access protesters in freezing weatherRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 21, 2016 | The Washington Post

    Police use a water cannon on protesters during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S. November 20, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith Tensions over the Dakota Access oil pipeline flared again Sunday when North Dakota law enforcement used tear gas and water cannons to disperse a group of about 400 protesters trying to move past a barricaded bridge toward construction sites for the controversial project.

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  9. Police and protesters clash at Dakota Access pipelineRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 20, 2016 | The Washington Post

    Law enforcement and protesters clash near the site of the Dakota Access pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D. The clash came as protesters sought to push past a bridge on a state highway that had been blockaded since late October, according to the Morton County Sheriff's Office. CANNON BALL, N.D. - Protesters clashed with law enforcement late Sunday near the site of the Dakota Access pipeline, with at least one person arrested as protesters sought to push past a bridge on a state highway that had been blockaded since late October.

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  10. Why it's right to keep the brakes on the Dakota Access oil pipelineRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 2, 2016 | The Washington Post

    Tonya Stands recovers after being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters. Jan Hasselman, a staff attorney at Earthjustice, is representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in its lawsuit challenging the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

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  11. Why Hollywood, environmentalists and Native Americans have converged on North DakotaRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 28, 2016 | The Washington Post

    Demonstrators stand next to burning tires as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers assemble on Thursday, Oct. 27 to force Dakota Access pipeline protesters off private land where they had camped to block construction. Why are celebrities like actor Mark Ruffalo, civil rights leader Jesse Jackson, liberal television anchor Amy Goodman and scores of Native Americans from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe all converging on a isolated spot along the Missouri river of North Dakota? On Thursday, the group was met by scores of police wearing riot gear and riding in military-style armored vehicles.

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  12. Police oust oil pipeline protesters from private landRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 27, 2016 | The Washington Post

    Tires burn as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers stand in formation on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, to force Dakota Access pipeline protesters off private land where they had camped to block construction. The pipeline is to carry oil from western North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to an existing pipeline in Patoka, Ill.

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  13. Showdown over oil pipeline becomes a national movement for Native AmericansRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 6, 2016 | The Washington Post

    The Missouri River is seen beyond an encampment Sept. 4, 2016, near Cannon Ball, N.D., where thousands have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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