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Results 1 - 20 of 48 for "u:sltrib.com" in Bismarck, ND

  1. Trump denies disaster declaration for Dakota Access pipelineRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 13, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a The Trump administration has denied a request from Republican North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum for a "major disaster declaration" to help cover some of the estimated $38 million cost to police protests of the Dakota Access pipeline. Burgum spokesman Mike Nowatzki says the governor was notified in May that the request had been denied.

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  2. Dakota pipeline no longer needs private securityRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 5, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a The developer of the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline said Wednesday that it no longer has private security personnel in North Dakota, including a firm that state regulators say operated illegally without a license. "We continue to have security measures in place in North Dakota, just no longer need boots on the ground," Energy Transfer Partners spokeswoman Vicki Granado said in an email to The Associated Press.

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  3. Dispute over Dakota Access handling of artifacts to lingerRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 4, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a A dispute over whether the Texas-based developer of the Dakota Access oil pipeline improperly reported the discovery of American Indian artifacts in North Dakota will linger into the fall, as the company continues fighting a relatively minor violation and small fine. Energy Transfer Partners has been battling since November when state regulators filed a complaint and proposed a $15,000 fine, which pales in comparison to the $3.8 billion cost of the pipeline that began moving oil last month.

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  4. Dakota Access pipeline review to re-examine impact on tribeRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 25, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    In this Feb. 22, 2017, file photo, a large crowd of the remaining Dakota Access Pipeline protesters march out of the Oceti Sakowin camp before the deadline set for evacuation of the camp mandated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers near Cannon Ball, N.D. A federal judge's order for more environmental review of the already-operating pipeline has several potential outcomes, all of which could spark even more wrangling in court.

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  5. Ruling on Dakota pipeline months awayRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 21, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a A federal judge won't decide until later this year whether to shut down the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline while federal officials conduct a more thorough environmental review. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg on Wednesday approved a schedule under which both sides in a lawsuit over the pipeline will submit written arguments on the matter in July and August.

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  6. 2 more Dakota Access pipeline leaks foundRead the original story w/Photo

    May 22, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a The Dakota Access pipeline system leaked more than 100 gallons of oil in North Dakota in two separate incidents in March - the second and third known leaks discovered as crews prepared the disputed $3.8 billion pipeline for operation. Two barrels, or 84 gallons, spilled due to a leaky flange at a pipeline terminal in Watford City on March 3, according to the state's Health Department.

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  7. Tribes fighting pipeline drop appeal but battle continuesRead the original story w/Photo

    May 18, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    In this Oct. 5, 2016, file photo, heavy equipment is seen at a site where sections of the Dakota Access pipeline were being buried near the town of St. Anthony in Morton County, N.D. American Indian tribes who are still fighting the Dakota Access oil pipeline in court have dropped an appeal of a federal judge's decision that allowed final construction to proceed on the project that is just two weeks from operating commercially. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg in early March refused to stop completion of the pipeline based on the claims of Sioux tribes that it threatens water they consider sacred.

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  8. Court OKs plan for $380M in Native American farmer lawsuitRead the original story w/Photo

    May 16, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a An appeals court panel on Tuesday approved a lower court's plan for distributing $380 million left over from the U.S. government's loan discrimination settlement with American Indian farmers and ranchers six years ago. The decision wasn't unanimous, however, with one of the three judges arguing that Congress should have had a say.

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  9. Oil pipeline opponents try going after the moneyRead the original story w/Photo

    May 14, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    In this Nov. 17, 2016, file photo, Dakota Access pipeline protesters form a circle as they demonstrate outside a Wells Fargo Bank branch in Bismarck, N.D. Opposition to the four-state Dakota Access oil pipeline has boosted efforts to persuade banks to stop supporting projects that might harm the environment or tread on indigenous rights. FILE - In this Nov. 17, 2016, file photo, Dakota Access pipeline protesters form a circle as they demonstrate outside a Wells Fargo Bank branch in Bismarck, N.D. Opposition to the four-state Dakota Access oil pipeline has boosted efforts to persuade banks to stop supporting projects that might harm the environment or tread on indigenous rights.

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  10. Dakota Access pipeline sprung a leak in AprilRead the original story w/Photo

    May 10, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a The Dakota Access pipeline leaked 84 gallons of oil in South Dakota early last month, which an American Indian tribe says bolsters its argument that the pipeline jeopardizes its water supply and deserves further environmental review. The April 4 spill was relatively small and was quickly cleaned up, and it didn't threaten any waterways.

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  11. Dakota Access pipeline developer in tree disputeRead the original story w/Photo

    May 5, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    In this Sept. 29, 2016, file photo, shows a section of the Dakota Access pipeline under construction near St. Anthony in Morton County, N.D. North Dakota regulators are investigating whether the developer of the pipeline removed too many trees while laying pipe in the state.

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  12. Authorities drop 33 cases against Dakota Access protestersRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 22, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a Authorities dropped nearly three dozen cases last month that stemmed from arrests of protesters against the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline, court records show. The Bismarck Tribune reported Saturday that prosecutors and judges dropped the 33 misdemeanor cases while another 14 were resolved by guilty pleas.

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  13. Dakota Access firm can keep some secretsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 12, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a A federal judge is allowing the developer of the Dakota Access oil pipeline to keep secret some but not all pipeline information that the company believes could be useful to vandals and terrorists. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said in a ruling dated Friday that information such as spill risks at various points along the pipeline should be shielded from public view but that certain details relating to how a spill might be handled don't warrant such protection.

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  14. Senators want details on Dakota Access decisionsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 5, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a Two Democratic U.S. senators want the chief of the Army Corps of Engineers to explain the agency's decision-making that ultimately paved the way for completion of the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline. Delaware Sen. Tom Carper and Washington Sen. Maria Cantwell are ranking Democratic members on Senate environment and energy committees.

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  15. Dakota Access attorneys fighting tribes' religion argumentRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 31, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a Attorneys for the developer of the Dakota Access pipeline are fighting an attempt by Sioux tribes to argue that oil under their water source potentially interferes with their religion, even as the company steadily fills the line with oil. The Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes sued last summer on other grounds, including that the pipeline threatened cultural sites and water supply, which they get from Lake Oahe, a reservoir on the Missouri River in North Dakota.

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  16. Dakota Access pipeline crossing of lake soughtRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 24, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    Bismarck, N.D. a The company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline and the Army Corps of Engineers want a judge to reject a request by American Indian tribes to revoke permission for the project to cross a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. Oil might already be flowing under Lake Oahe, but the Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Yankton and Oglala Sioux tribes are continuing their legal battle against the pipeline in the hope that a judge will order it shut down.

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  17. Pipeline vandalism highlights sabotage risksRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 22, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    In this Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo shows the site where the final phase of the Dakota Access pipeline will take place with boring equipment routing the pipeline underground and across Lake Oahe to connect with the existing pipeline in Emmons County near Cannon Ball, N.D. Environmental activists who tried to disrupt some oil pipeline operations in four states to protest the pipeline say they aren't responsible for any recent attacks on that pipeline. Dakota Access developer Energy Transfer Partners said in court documents Monday, March 20, 2017, that there have been "coordinated physical attacks" along the $3.8 billion pipeline that will carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois.

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  18. Environment activists deny attacking Dakota Access pipelineRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 21, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    In this Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo shows the site where the final phase of the Dakota Access pipeline will take place with boring equipment routing the pipeline underground and across Lake Oahe to connect with the existing pipeline in Emmons County near Cannon Ball, N.D. Environmental activists who tried to disrupt some oil pipeline operations in four states to protest the pipeline say they aren't responsible for any recent attacks on that pipeline. Dakota Access developer Energy Transfer Partners said in court documents Monday, March 20, 2017, that there have been "coordinated physical attacks" along the $3.8 billion pipeline that will carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois.

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  19. Judge combines 4 tribal suits over Dakota Access pipelineRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 17, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    This Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo, shows a site where the final phase of the Dakota Access pipeline is taking place with boring equipment routing the pipeline underground and across Lake Oahe to connect with the existing pipeline in Emmons County near Cannon Ball, N.D. Federal Judge James Boasberg on Tuesday, March 14 denied a request by the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux to stop oil from flowing while they appeal his earlier decision allowing pipeline construction to finish.

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  20. U.S. taxpayers might foot the bill for pipeline protest costsRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 17, 2017 | Salt Lake Tribune

    In this Nov. 2, 2016, file photo, protesters demonstrating against the expansion of the Dakota Access pipeline wade in cold creek waters confronting local police near Cannon Ball, N.D. North Dakota officials appear poised to go after the U.S. government - and thus U.S. taxpayers - to recoup more than $38 million in state expenses related to months of protests against the Dakota Access pipeline.

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