Birmingham Newswire

Birmingham Newswire

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Results 1 - 20 of 20 for "u:news.health.com" in Birmingham, AL

  1. Smog May Boost Risk for Several CancersRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 29 | Health.com

    Long-term exposure to fine particles of air pollution - from cars, trucks, power plants and manufacturing facilities - is tied to an increased risk of dying from several kinds of cancer, a new study suggests. "Air pollution remains a clear, modifiable public health concern," said researcher G. Neil Thomas, a reader in epidemiology at the University of Birmingham in England.

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  2. Your Income, Hometown May Be Key to Your LifespanRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 11 | Health.com

    "We find very large differences across areas [of the United States] for the poor but very small differences across areas for the rich," said study lead author Raj Chetty. In other words, "where you live matters much more if you are poor than if you are rich," Chetty, a Stanford University economist, said in a university news release.

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  3. Stay Safe in the Water This Spring BreakRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 29, 2016 | Health.com

    For many Americans, spring break is a good time to head for a beach, lake or pool, which means it's also time to start thinking about water safety. "Families seem to be spending time around water this time of year, so it is important to remind ourselves of the basics of water safety," Michelle Fanucchi, chair in the department of environmental health sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said in a university news release.

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  4. Stress of Caring for Sick Spouse May Raise Stroke RiskRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 4, 2016 | Health.com

    Husbands and wives who feel the strain of caring for a sick or disabled spouse are at a higher risk of stroke than those who do not have to care for their significant other, a new study suggests. Spouse caregivers who said they were stressed had a 95 percent higher stroke risk when compared to "matched" non-caregivers with similar demographic, lifestyle and stroke risk factors, according to the study.

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  5. Sleeping Pills May Spell Trouble for Older DriversRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 25, 2016 | Health.com

    Older drivers who use the sleeping pill zolpidem, sold widely as Ambien, may have a higher risk of motor vehicle crashes, a new study suggests. Researchers evaluated the five-year driving records of 2,000 Alabama residents, aged 70 and older, comparing those who used the sleeping pill to those who did not.

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  6. Keeping Your Child's Teeth HealthyRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 21, 2016 | Health.com

    There are a number of things parents can do to help their children enjoy a lifetime with healthy teeth and gums, a dental expert says. Start by creating a foundation of a balanced diet, limiting snacks, and brushing and flossing each day, said Stephen Mitchell, director of predoctoral pediatric dentistry at the School of Dentistry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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  7. Severe Gum Disease May Boost Death Rate of Kidney Disease PatientsRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 18, 2016 | Health.com

    The findings add to growing evidence that poor oral health is associated with other chronic diseases, according to the researchers at the University of Birmingham in England. They analyzed data from more than 13,700 Americans who took part in a federal government health survey.

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  8. Wildfires May Boost Ozone Levels in Cities: StudyRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 5, 2016 | Health.com

    Colorado State University scientists analyzed data collected over nearly 10 years at hundreds of air monitoring sites across the United States. They found that ozone levels were higher on days when there was wildfire smoke in the air than on days without the smoke.

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  9. Long-Term Pot Use May Make Word Recall Tougher in Middle AgeRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 1, 2016 | Health.com

    People who smoke marijuana as young adults may have a slightly harder time remembering words by the time they reach middle age, a new study suggests. However, pot use does not appear to damage or dim other mental capacities, such as the ability to think quickly, focus or problem-solve, the study authors said.

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  10. Race Not Tied to Threat of Second Stroke, Study FindsRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 20, 2016 | Health.com

    Younger black people are three times more likely to have a stroke than their white peers, but they may not be at greater risk for a second stroke, new research suggests. "The interaction between black race and age appears to be remarkably different for the risk of first versus second stroke," said study author George Howard, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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  11. Even Slight Kidney Decline May Affect HeartRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 11, 2016 | Health.com

    "Mild chronic kidney disease is common, affecting over 10 percent of the U.S. population, so if kidney disease really is a cause of heart disease it may be a major public health problem," said study senior author Dr. Jonathan Townend, a professor of cardiology at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham in England. The study, published Jan. 11 in the journal Hypertension , included 68 living kidney donors, average age 47, who were followed for a year after donating their kidney.

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  12. 5 Tips to Help Make New Year's Resolutions StickRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 1, 2016 | Health.com

    New Year's resolutions are more easily made than kept, but there are ways to turn them into lifelong habits, a psychologist says. "Everyone is motivated when they first decide to make a New Year's resolution," Josh Klapow, a clinical psychologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said in a university news release.

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  13. Progesterone May Not Help Prevent Repeat Miscarriage, Study FindsRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 25, 2015 | Health.com

    Taking progesterone supplements in the first trimester of pregnancy may not improve the odds of motherhood for women with a history of miscarriage, a new study finds. Researchers found that among more than 800 women with one or more unexplained miscarriages, those who received the hormone in early pregnancy were no less likely to miscarry than those who received a placebo.

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  14. Alzheimer's-Linked Brain Plaques May Also Slow Blood FlowRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 24, 2015 | Health.com

    They've long been associated with Alzheimer's disease, and now new research in animals suggests that protein plaques might slow the brain's blood flow, as well. Buildup of the amyloid beta protein clumps could harm the brain in multiple ways, according to a team from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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  15. New Blood Test May Help Predict Heart Disease Risks in Obese Black TeensRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 17, 2015 | Health.com

    A new blood test appears to help predict the risk for future heart disease among black teens struggling with obesity. The test was designed to measure changes in the T-cell status of obese teens.

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  16. Social Factors Affect Leukemia SurvivalRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 14, 2015 | Health.com

    For people diagnosed with a type of cancer called acute myelogenous leukemia , social and economic factors can affect the odds of survival, a new study shows. "As physicians, we often emphasize more of the biology of the cancer, especially with the recent focus on personalized medicine.

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  17. 6 Weird Diet Tricks That Actually WorkRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 3, 2015 | Health.com

    Some clients come to me in search of a complete eating overhaul , including a meal plan with specific portions and recipes. Many others, however, simply want the shortcuts.

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  18. Southern Cooking Boosts Risk for Heart AttackRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 11, 2015 | Health.com

    Fried chicken, sweet tea and greens cooked in bacon fat - delicious hallmarks of a Southern diet - may increase your risk for a heart attack, a new study suggests. Lead researcher James Shikany, a professor of nutritional epidemiology at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, said that regularly eating Southern-style dishes was linked to a 56 percent increased risk for heart attack during the almost six years of the study.

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  19. More Evidence That Southern Cooking Boosts Heart RiskRead the original story w/Photo

    Aug 10, 2015 | Health.com

    Fried chicken, sweet tea and greens cooked in bacon fat - delicious hallmarks of a Southern diet - may increase your risk for a heart attack, a new study suggests. Lead researcher James Shikany, a professor of nutritional epidemiology at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, said that regularly eating Southern-style dishes was linked to a 56 percent increased risk for heart attack during the almost six years of the study.

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  20. Big Swings in Blood Pressure Could Spell TroubleRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 27, 2015 | Health.com

    The large study of people taking blood pressure medication found that variations of more than 14 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure readings between doctor visits was linked to a 25 percent increased risk of heart failure. Systolic blood pressure is the top number in a blood pressure reading.

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