Berkeley Newswire

Berkeley Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Berkeley, CA.

Results 1 - 20 of 54 for "u:news.xinhuanet.com" in Berkeley, CA

  1. Brain repositions eyeballs during blink: studyRead the original story

    Thursday | Xinhuanet

    New research led by the University of California, Berkeley, shows that when our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets every few seconds, our brains repositions our eyeballs so we can stay focused on what we're viewing. When our eyeballs roll back in their sockets during a blink, they don't always return to the same spot when we reopen our eyes.

    Comment?

  2. Way found to reprogram mouse embryonic stem cellsRead the original story

    Saturday Jan 14 | Xinhuanet

    Researchers with the University of California, Berkeley, have found a way to reprogram mouse embryonic stem cells so that they exhibit developmental characteristics resembling those of fertilized eggs, or zygotes. A fertilized egg is thought to possess full developmental potential, able to generate all cell types required for embryo gestation, including the developing embryo and its extra-embryonic tissues.

    Comment?

  3. Snails found able to travel far, spreading deadly diseaseRead the original story

    Tuesday Jan 10 | Xinhuanet

    A new research indicates that parasite-carrying snails can travel long distances, up to 27 miles, or 44 kilometers, spreading a deadly disease along the way. Led by a researcher with the University of California, Berkeley, the study published in the journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases was the first to find genetic evidence for long-distance movements among snails that pose an important public health threat.

    Comment?

  4. U.S. engineers build most vertically agile wall-jumping robotRead the original story

    Dec 10, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, have built a small robot capable of leaping into the air and then springing off a wall, or performing multiple vertical jumps in a row, resulting in the highest robotic vertical jumping agility ever recorded. The robot, known as Salto, short for saltatorial locomotion on terrain obstacles, weighs 3.5 ounces, or 100 grams; is 10.2 inches, or 26 centimeters, tall when fully extended, and can jump up to one meter.

    Comment?

  5. Oakland warehouse 85 percent searched, death tolls remains at 36Read the original story

    Dec 6, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    The Oakland warehouse where a deadly fire broke out over the weekend has been 85 percent searched and the death toll remained at 36 as of Tuesday morning, officials said. Of the victims, 26 have been positively identified and their families notified, Alameda County Sheriff's Deputy Tya Modeste told a press briefing.

    Comment?

  6. Human brain takes less than a second to tell reality from fantasy: studyRead the original story

    Dec 1, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    The study, by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, reveals a visual mechanism they call "ensemble lifelikeness perception," which determines how humans perceive groups of objects and people in real and virtual or artificial worlds. "This unique visual mechanism allows us to perceive what's really alive and what's simulated in just 250 milliseconds," said Allison Yamanashi Leib, a postdoctoral scholar in psychology at UC Berkeley, and lead author of a paper published in the journal Nature Communications.

    Comment?

  7. Researcher calls for long-term planning for recovery from big quakeRead the original story

    Nov 27, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    In light of new findings by seismologists in California and recent earthquakes outside the United States , a U.S. researcher has called for long-term planning to deal with a big event. Mary Comerio, a professor in the College of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley, believes there are two parts to disaster preparedness: the physical stuff, namely making buildings and bridges stronger; and the administrative stuff, namely thinking about what issues are going to happen, and then making a plan.

    Comment?

  8. Modified genes in photosynthesis boosts crop yieldRead the original story

    Nov 22, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    Researchers have increased the production of specific genes to make use of light more efficient by tobacco, effectively boosting the productivity of the model crop. The research results from plant biologists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Illinois were described in the latest issue of the journal Science.

    Comment?

  9. Int'l team identifies smallest salamander speciesRead the original story

    Nov 16, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    An international team of researchers has identified three new species of the world's smallest salamander and warned that the rare creatures are in danger of dying out. The species, from the enigmatic genus Thorius, the adults of which are smaller than a matchstick, are the smallest four-legged tailed organism on Earth, and their miniaturized bodies are highly unusual for vertebrates.

    Comment?

  10. Review probes downtime thought patterns, neural network interactionsRead the original story

    Nov 5, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    A review of brain imaging studies offers a new way of looking at spontaneous versus controlled thinking, challenging the adage that a wandering mind is an unhappy mind. "Mind-wandering" and its variations are what psychology has traditionally described about all thought patterns when people have during downtime -- some daydream while others might focus on a to-do list, or get stuck in a negative loop.

    Comment?

  11. U.S. study finds wide exposure to environmental pollutants among pregnant womenRead the original story

    Nov 2, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    A new study in San Francisco indicates that pregnant women, especially those from low-income and Latino families, have widespread exposure to environmental pollutants and many chemicals are absorbed at greater levels by fetuses than by the pregnant women. The findings, by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of California, San Francisco, and Biomonitoring California, derived from testing of maternal blood samples collected from 77 pregnant women at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital from 2010 to 2011 and of umbilical cord blood samples from 65 of these women once they delivered their babies.

    Comment?

  12. Repellent/insecticide combination proposed to fight malarial mosquitoRead the original story

    Oct 30, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    Researchers in their efforts to fight malaria have proposed using insect repellents along with insecticides to extend the lifetime of the insecticides we have today and, paradoxically, evolve mosquitoes with greater aversion to the repellent. "If you combine these two, you should get better repellents and you should get a slower resistance to the insecticide, so it will last longer or forever," said population biologist Michael Boots, a University of California, Berkeley, professor of integrative biology, who worked with his colleagues at Exeter University in the United Kingdom on the project and described the technique in an article in the open-access journal eLife.

    Comment?

  13. UC Berkeley researcher to study language development via batsRead the original story

    Oct 26, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    A researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, has received a grant to study the neurobiological basis of language learning in the mammalian brain using an unusual model system: the bat. The grant, 1.5 million U.S. dollars over five years from the New York Stem Cell Foundation , will go to Michael Yartsev, assistant professor in the Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley, according to a news release from the school in northern California.

    Comment?

  14. Study identifies climate refuges for endangered snow leopardsRead the original story

    Oct 13, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    A new study has identified three climate refuges around the Altai, Qilian and Tian Shan-Pamir-Hindu Kush-Karakoram mountain ranges for snow leopards, which are critically important to the Tibetan Plateau ecosystem. However, the study published in the journal Biological Conservation noted that just one-third of snow leopards' current range will be a refuge from climate change by 2070, as habitat loss and fragmentation in the Himalaya and Hengduan mountains threaten snow leopards and other species in the region.

    Comment?

  15. Climate change: greatest threat to tropical frogsRead the original story

    Oct 9, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    A new study by researchers from several U.S. institutions suggests that climate change may be the most destructive force against tropical frogs. While changes in climate and land use are expected to reduce the livable area for tropical frogs, the researchers have found that declines in frogs' thermally suitable habitat area from climate change alone could be up to 4.5 times greater than declines attributable to land-cover change only, such as converting a forest to agriculture.

    Comment?

  16. UC Berkeley to work with CDC on UTI caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteriaRead the original story

    Oct 8, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    The University of California, Berkeley, has received a grant to study whether food is a significant source of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria that cause urinary tract infections , the most common bacterial infections in the developed world. The 560,000 U.S. dollars grant was awarded earlier this week by the U.S. federal government agency Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Atlanta, Georgia, to the research project led by Lee Riley, a professor of infectious diseases at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health.

    Comment?

  17. Calcium found playing major role in regulating bone growthRead the original story

    Oct 6, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have found that calcium, the main constituent of bone, plays a major role in regulating the cells that orchestrate bone growth. The finding, which came from study of the signals that tell undifferentiated stem cells in the very early embryo to mature into bone cells, could affect treatment for conditions caused by too much collagen deposition, such as fibrosis and excessive scarring, and diseases of too little bone growth, such as Treacher Collins Syndrome , and could also explain how messing with the body's calcium levels during pregnancy can cause facial deformities such as those associated with fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Comment?

  18. Online game invites public to help fight Alzheimer'sRead the original story

    Oct 6, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    A new online science game, called Stall Catchers, allows the general public to contribute to Alzheimer's disease research and help researchers search for a cure. Developed by the Human Computation Institute, in collaboration with the University of California, Berkeley, and other institutions, the game is part of the EyesOnALZ citizen science project that allow participants to look at movies of real blood vessels in mouse brains and search for clogged capillaries, or stalls, where blood is no longer flowing.

    Comment?

  19. Online game invites public to help fight Alzheimer'sRead the original story

    Oct 5, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    A new online science game, called Stall Catchers, allows the general public to contribute to Alzheimer's disease research and help researchers search for a cure. Developed by the Human Computation Institute, in collaboration with the University of California, Berkeley, and other institutions, the game is part of the EyesOnALZ citizen science project that allow participants to look at movies of real blood vessels in mouse brains and search for clogged capillaries, or stalls, where blood is no longer flowing.

    Comment?

  20. UC Berkeley researchers reveal deep earth dynamics with "CT scans"Read the original story

    Sep 25, 2016 | Xinhuanet

    Researchers with the University of California, Berkeley , have used the largest array of seismometers ever deployed on the seafloor and hundreds of others in the continental United States to create "CT scans" of the Juan de Fuca plate and part of the earth's mantle directly below it. The massive tectonic plate is grinding under the North America continent along an 800-mile swath that runs from northern California in the United States to Vancouver Island in Canada, known as the Cascadia subduction zone.

    Comment?

Berkeley Job Listings
View or post Berkeley job listings on Topix.
Berkeley Real Estate
News, listings, and foreclosures in Berkeley from Topix.
Berkeley Mortgages
Find mortgage rates in Berkeley on Topix.