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Results 1 - 20 of 33 for "u:nature.com" in Berkeley, CA

  1. California scientists push to create massive climate-research programmeRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 16 | NatureNews

    California has a history of going it alone to protect the environment. Now, as US President Donald Trump pulls back on climate science and policy, scientists in the Golden State are sketching plans for a home-grown climate-research institute - to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars per year.

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  2. Commit to talks on patient data and public healthRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Aug 8 | Nature

    Of course it was going to happen - and now it has. Last week, an international team reported the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing techniques to correct a heart-wrenching mutation in human embryos .

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  3. Jordan stakes its future on scienceRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Aug 2 | NatureNews

    The country wants to use a focus on research to solve its problems and build diplomatic ties in the Middle East. When the World Science Forum kicks off on the shore of the Dead Sea in November, it will be the latest jewel in the crown for one of Jordan's biggest champions of science.

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  4. Big Bang gravitational effect observed in lab crystalRead the original story w/Photo

    Jul 20, 2017 | NatureNews

    An exotic effect in particle physics that's theorized to occur in immense gravitational fields - near a black hole, or in conditions just after the Big Bang - has been seen in a lump of material in a laboratory, physicists report. A team led by physicist Johannes Gooth at IBM Research near Zurich, Switzerland, say they have seen evidence for a long-predicted effect called the axial-gravitational anomaly 1 .

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  5. Institutions: Small-school scienceRead the original story w/Photo

    Jun 7, 2017 | Nature

    Sometimes, downsizing pays off. After working as a postdoctoral researcher at large institutions including the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Oregon in Eugene, evolutionary biologist Hélène Morlon now runs her own laboratory at the École Normale Supérieure , a small college tucked into central Paris.

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  6. Materials and engineering: Rebuilding the worldRead the original story w/Photo

    May 17, 2017 | Nature

    Chemist Zoey Herm fills a balloon with carbon dioxide using a bike-tyre cartridge, then fits it over the lip of a bottle of chalky white pellets. While she chats with fellow chemist Thomas McDonald, co-founder and chief executive of start-up Mosaic Materials, the bottle becomes warm to the touch, releasing heat as the porous materials inside absorb the CO2.

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  7. Bioengineering: Solar upgradeRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 26, 2017 | Nature

    Plant biologist Krishna Niyogi opens the doors of growing cabinets in his lab at the University of California, Berkeley, revealing rows of tobacco and Arabidopsis plants. Under the warm solar lamps, vibrant green algae thrives in rotating flasks and streaked on petri dishes.

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  8. Unravelling why shoelace knots failRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 12, 2017 | NatureNews

    Oliver O'Reilly was teaching his daughter to tie her shoes when he realized something: he had no idea why shoelaces suddenly come undone. When he went looking for an answer, it was apparent that no one else knew either.

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  9. Saturn spacecraft begins science swan-songRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 12, 2017 | NatureNews

    After 13 years exploring Saturn and its moons , NASA's Cassini spacecraft has just 5 months left to live. But it will go out with a scientific bang.

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  10. Molecular biology: Drug stalls protein translationRead the original story

    Mar 29, 2017 | Nature

    The discovery of a compound that interrupts the production of a specific protein could open up a fresh path to drug discovery. Cells rely on complex molecular machines called ribosomes to translate the genetic code and make proteins.

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  11. Dinosaur family tree poised for colossal shake-upRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 22, 2017 | NatureNews

    The longstanding division of dinosaurs into 'bird-hipped' species including Stegosaurus and their 'lizard-hipped' counterparts such as Brachiosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex may no longer be valid, a study published on 22 March in Nature contends 1 . Among the other proposed changes to the dinosaur family tree, the long-necked herbivorous and often gargantuan sauropods such as Brachiosaurus are no longer as closely related to bipedal, meat-eating theropods such as T. rex as they were under previous schemes.

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  12. Synthetic biology: Enter the living machineRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 8, 2017 | Nature

    In 2000, two landmark papers started a revolution in our ability to design entirely new functions inside cells. The authors took two electronic circuits — an oscillator and a switch — and built the equivalent from living matter .

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  13. The quest to crystallize timeRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 8, 2017 | NatureNews

    Christopher Monroe spends his life poking at atoms with light. He arranges them into rings and chains and then massages them with lasers to explore their properties and make basic quantum computers.

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  14. Dying woolly mammoths were in 'genetic meltdown'Read the original story w/Photo

    Mar 2, 2017 | NatureNews

    Woolly mammoth populations were plentiful 45,000 years ago, but went into genomic freefall as their numbers dwindled around 4,000 years ago. Isolated on an island in the Arctic Ocean, not only were woolly mammoths the last of a dying species but they were also swamped with 'bad genes' that are likely to have stripped their sense of smell and saddled them with translucent coats.

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  15. Broad Institute wins bitter battle over CRISPR patentsRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 15, 2017 | Nature

    In December 2016, lawyers representing the University of California and the Broad Institute participated in oral arguments before a trio of patent-court judges. The US Patent and Trademark Office has upheld a series of patents granted to the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard for the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology.

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  16. Climate change: The high cost of keeping coolRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 15, 2017 | Nature

    The potential increase in air-conditioning use in a warming climate could boost the cost of meeting peak demand for electricity in the United States by up to US Maximilian Auffhammer at the University of California, Berkeley, and his colleagues assessed how temperature extremes affect consumption of electricity by analysing nine years of data on power use and weather from 166 areas of the United States.

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  17. 'Riskiest ideas' win $50 million from Chan Zuckerberg BiohubRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 8, 2017 | Nature

    Initiative's first grants will fund a medley of wild ideas from top San Francisco Bay Area biologists, engineers and programmers. Jill Banfield, a geomicrobiologist, studies bacteria and archaea, looking for genes and proteins that manipulate the genomes of other species.

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  18. 'Riskiest ideas' win $50 million from Chan Zuckerberg BiohubRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 8, 2017 | NatureNews

    The biomedical research initiative created by Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, physician Priscilla Chan, has awarded its first grants to scientists, on topics ranging from the genomics of obscure microbes to a memory-retrieval device. in the next five years from the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a partnership between the couple's Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and three universities: Stanford, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of California, San Francisco.

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  19. Geneticist launches bid for US SenateRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 27, 2017 | NatureNews

    In the week since President Donald Trump took the oath of office, scientists have taken to social media en masse, decrying the new administration's plan to dismantle climate regulations, reports that the administration has censored government scientists' speech and the coining of the term "alternative facts." But Michael Eisen, a geneticist at the University of California, Berkeley, thinks that the situation requires more drastic action.

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  20. Five big mysteries about CRISPR's originsRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 12, 2017 | NatureNews

    Francisco Mojica was not the first to see CRISPR, but he was probably the first to be smitten by it. He remembers the day in 1992 when he got his first glimpse of the microbial immune system that would launch a biotechnology revolution .

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