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Results 1 - 20 of 41 for "u:medicalxpress.com" in Berkeley, CA

  1. Wealth, power or lack thereof at heart of many mental disordersRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Dec 8 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Donald Trump's ego may be the size of his financial empire, but that doesn't mean he's the picture of mental health. The same can be said about the self-esteem of people who are living from paycheck to paycheck, or unemployed.

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  2. Hybrid chemical / genetic therapy restores light sensitivity to retina in blind mice, dogsRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Dec 8 | PhysOrg Weblog

    In normal mice with working photoreceptors , stimulating the retina produces a variety of responses in retinal ganglion cells, the output of the eye. This can be seen in the colorful lower square, where measurements of the activity of different retinal ganglion cells are shown in response to the same stimulation.

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  3. Study links running to lower Alzheimer's death riskRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 4 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Running more than 15 miles a week may reduce the risk of dying from Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. Walking can help, too, if the amount of energy expended is equivalent to running more than 15 miles weekly, the study found.

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  4. Universal prescription drug coverage improves seniors' health outcomesRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 4 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Over the past decade, a growing number of provinces - including British Columbia - have discontinued comprehensive drug benefits for seniors, instead implementing income-based programs that provide public subsidies for prescription drug costs that exceed household income thresholds. "It sounds like a good idea, except it isn't," researchers say.

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  5. Even the perceived risk of disease prompts intention to actRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 4 | PhysOrg Weblog

    With so much focus on risk factors for disease, we are living in an era of surveillance medicine, in which the emphasis on risk blurs the lines between health and illness, argue researchers at Yale and Syracuse universities in a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior . Co-authors Rene Almeling, assistant professor of sociology at Yale, and Shana Kushner Gadarian, assistant professor of political science at Syracuse University, conducted a nationwide survey of American adults to determine if healthy people react to hypothetical genetic risk information by wanting to take action.

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  6. Professors weigh effectiveness of tax on soda and other sweetened drinksRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 4 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Several states and cities have and continue to propose a tax on soft drinks in an effort to curb obesity. In November, voters in Berkeley, California, were the first to approve such a tax.

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  7. Scientists detect brain network that gives humans superior reasoning skillsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Dec 3 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Scientists identified the frontoparietal network as playing a key role in higher-order reasoning Credit: iStockphoto/University of California - Berkeley When it comes to getting out of a tricky situation, we humans have an evolutionary edge over other primates. Take, as a dramatic example, the Apollo 13 voyage in which engineers, against all odds, improvised a chemical filter on a lunar module to prevent carbon dioxide buildup from killing the crew.

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  8. Widening wage gap linked to more deaths among black AmericansRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Dec 1 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Greater income inequality is linked to more deaths among African Americans, but the effect is reversed among white Americans, who experienced fewer deaths, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. The study, published in the fall 2014 issue of the International Journal of Health Services , highlights stark racial differences in the effects of the widening gap between the rich and poor.

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  9. Rx for better health care: Kindness and compassionRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Nov 24 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Various studies suggest that when health care workers approach patients with compassion, patients often heal faster, have less pain and anxiety, and even bounce back faster from common colds. "When health care is delivered with kindness and compassion, it has a significantly greater effect than when it is given in a dispassionate fashion that assumes that the human connection has no benefit," said Dr. James Doty, founder and director of Stanford University School of Medicine's Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education.

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  10. Threats of terrorism perceived differently depending on identification within a groupRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Nov 24 | PhysOrg Weblog

    People who see their group as more homogenous - for instance, the more one thinks Americans are similar to each other - are less likely to be influenced by external terrorist threat alerts, according to research from NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. "Among people who viewed their group to be homogeneous, external threat did not translate to higher perceived threat, and they did not influence beliefs about the legitimacy of the U.S. military intervention in Iraq," said study author Rezarta Bilali, assistant professor of psychology and social intervention at NYU Steinhardt.

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  11. Making health services prices available linked to lower total claims paymentsRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 21, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Searching a health service pricing website before using the service was associated with lower payments for clinical services such as advanced imaging and laboratory tests, according to a study in the October 22/29 issue of JAMA . Recent changes in the health care insurance market have resulted in commercially insured patients bearing a greater proportion of their health care costs .

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  12. Hospital acquisitions leading to increased patient costsRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 21, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    The trend of hospitals consolidating medical groups and physician practices in an effort to improve the coordination of patient care is backfiring and increasing the cost of patient care, according to a new study led by the University of California, Berkeley. The counterintuitive findings, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association , come as a growing number of local hospitals and large, multi-hospital systems in this country are acquiring physician groups and medical practices.

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  13. Cytokine therapy enhances natural killer cell functions against tumor cellsRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 20, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Natural killer cells are sentinels within the immune system that rapidly respond to and kill diseased cells. NK cells typically target and eliminate cells lacking the surface protein MHC class I. However, many tumor cells lack this protein yet are resistant to NK cell surveillance and killing.

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  14. Children's genes affect their mothers' risk of rheumatoid arthritisRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 19, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    A child's genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mother's risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are at higher risk of developing the disease than men. This research will be presented Tuesday, October 21, at the American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.

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  15. New front in war on Alzheimer's and other protein-linked brain diseasesRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 16, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    A cell suffering heat shock is like a country besieged, where attackers first sever lines of communications. The pat-10 gene helps repair communication to allow chaperones to treat misfolded proteins.

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  16. Researchers to build wearable interface to make prosthetics more comfortableRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 9, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthapaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved. Haiying Huang, professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at UT Arlington's Research Institute, are collaborating on the project.

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  17. Fixing a faulty molecular 'transport hub' could slow brain degenerationRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 9, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    University of Queensland researchers have gained new insights into how the body sorts and transports protein 'cargo' within our cells, in a finding that could eventually lead to treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. An international research team co-led by Dr Brett Collins from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience has revealed the structure of a molecular transport hub that sorts, directs and transports protein to correct destinations in the cell.

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  18. Grapefruit juice stems weight gain in mice fed a high-fat diet, study findsRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 8, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Fad diets come and go, but might there be something to the ones that involve consuming grapefruit and grapefruit juice? New research at the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that a closer look at grapefruit juice is warranted. A new study, to be published Wednesday, Oct. 8, in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE , found that mice fed a high-fat diet gained 18 percent less weight when they drank clarified, no-pulp grapefruit juice compared with a control group of mice that drank water.

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  19. Study: Indian government health insurance reduced mortality among the poorRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 8, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    A government program to provide health insurance for catastrophic illness to households below the poverty line in Karnataka, lowered both mortality rates and out-of-pocket expenses for the residents, according to a recent evaluation published in the leading global health journal The BMJ . An evaluation of the program, the Vajpayee Arogyashree Scheme , funded by the World Bank Group and led by Neeraj Sood, professor and director of research at the USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics found that: "This World Bank study clearly shows how this program benefits the health of the poor in Karnataka," said U.T. Khader, the state's Minister of Health and Family Welfare.

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  20. Team finds neural compensation in people with Alzheimer's-related proteinRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 14, 2014 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Shown are fMRI scans across all subjects in the study. The yellow and red areas in Section A represent parts of the brain that are activated while subjects are forming 'gist memories' of pictures viewed.

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