Berkeley Newswire

Berkeley Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Berkeley, CA.

Results 1 - 20 of 50 for "u:medicalxpress.com" in Berkeley, CA

  1. From brouhaha to coordination: Motor learning from the neuron's point of viewRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Feb 9 | PhysOrg Weblog

    This is a scanning electron micrograph of a human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron. Credit: Thomas Deerinck, UC San Diego When starting to learn to play the piano, there is much hesitation and hitting the wrong keys.

    Comment?

  2. Transplanted neurons incorporated into a stroke-injured rat brainRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 23 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Today, a stroke usually leads to permanent disability - but in the future, the stroke-injured brain could be reparable by replacing dead cells with new, healthy neurons, using transplantation. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have taken a step in that direction by showing that some neurons transplanted into the brains of stroke-injured rats were incorporated and responded correctly when the rat's muzzle and paws were touched.

    Comment?

  3. New trial may revolutionise treatment of spinal cord injury patientsRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 20, 2017 | PhysOrg Weblog

    In the study, led by The University of Queensland and The Princess Alexandra Hospital, a new anti-inflammatory drug will be given to participants within hours of spinal trauma in an effort to minimise tissue damage. Dr Marc Ruitenberg from the UQ School of Biomedical Sciences said when the spinal cord is injured, it becomes inflamed and this causes a lot of additional damage.

    Comment?

  4. Why the lights don't dim when we blinkRead the original story

    Jan 19, 2017 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. So why doesn't blinking plunge us into intermittent darkness and light? New research led by the University of California, Berkeley, shows that the brain works extra hard to stabilize our vision despite our fluttering eyes.

    Comment?

  5. Fat degrading enzyme implicated in type 2 diabetesRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 18, 2017 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Investigators at Karolinska Institutet have identified a potential therapeutic target for treatment of obesity-associated metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis. The work, performed in collaboration with scientists at the University of California, Berkeley and Danderyd Hospital, is published in Cell Reports .

    Comment?

  6. Pop-outs: How the brain extracts meaning from noiseRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 20, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    When you're suddenly able to understand someone despite their thick accent, or finally make out the lyrics of a song, your brain appears to be re-tuning to recognize speech that was previously incomprehensible. University of California, Berkeley, neuroscientists have now observed this re-tuning in action by recording directly from the surface of a person's brain as the words of a previously unintelligible sentence suddenly pop out after the subject is told the meaning of the garbled speech.

    Comment?

  7. Herpes virus linked to most common type of childhood cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 15, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus -a common virus in the herpes family-may have an increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia , according to new research published online today in Blood , the Journal of the American Society of Hematology . The study suggests the risk is even greater in Hispanic children.

    Comment?

  8. It takes less than a second to tell humans from androidsRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 28, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    We can be fooled by androids like Maeve in the TV show Westworld, but not so much in real life, a new study suggests. Credit: University of California - Berkeley It can be hard to tell the difference between humans and androids in such sci-fi TV shows as "Westworld."

    Comment?

  9. Missed connections: As people age, memory-related brain activity loses cohesionRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 23, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    The older age group experiences a dramatic increase in the number of groups of closely related activity that each brain region belongs to. This is reflective of the overall increase in the number of these groups with age.

    Comment?

  10. Risk-taking behaviors tied to racial disparities in HIV in gay communitiesRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 14, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    On the surface, data indicate that gay black men are 4.5 times as likely to have HIV, while white gay men are 16 times as likely than heterosexual men of their same race. But work by Drexel University researchers showed that those numbers aren't actually a true representation of HIV risk.

    Comment?

  11. Pesticide exposures can cause changes in oral microbiomeRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 11, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Pesticide exposure in farmworkers from agricultural communities is associated with changes in the oral microbiome. This is the first study to demonstrate such a correlation in humans.

    Comment?

  12. Brain scientists examine brain networks during short-term task learningRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 3, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Increasing communication between the cingulo-opercular network and the dorsal attention network , and decoupling of the default mode network from the cingulo-opercular network during short practice phases. Credit: Holger Mohr et al. 'Practice makes perfect' is a common saying.

    Comment?

  13. Understanding mind-wandering could shed light on mental illnessRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 31, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    A University of British Columbia-led review of mind-wandering research, published in the November issue of Nature Reviews Neuroscience , proposes a new framework for understanding how thoughts flow, even at rest. The authors argue that their new framework could help better understand the stream of consciousness of patients diagnosed with mental illnesses like depression, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder .

    Comment?

  14. Nanoparticle vaccinates mice against dengue feverRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 20, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    This transmission electron micrograph depicts a number of round, Dengue virus particles that were revealed in this tissue specimen. Credit: CDC/ Frederick Murphy Every year, more than 350 million people in over 120 countries contact dengue fever, which can cause symptoms ranging from achy muscles and a skin rash to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever.

    Comment?

  15. Childrens' decision making-Rules of thumb are learned with timeRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 19, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Chicago or Akron? When children are asked which city is bigger, nine-year-olds use the rule of thumb "bigger is more well-known" for their decision. Credit: Christopher Futcher/ iStock Children as young as nine years old use rules of thumb systematically when making decisions.

    Comment?

  16. Genome engineering paves the way for sickle cell cureRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 12, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Sickle hemoglobin polymerizes under low oxygen tensions in the tissues, causing the red blood cell to deform. This leads to obstruction in the capillaries and painful episodes for patients.

    Comment?

  17. In the fight against Alzheimer's, online gamers can now get in on the actionRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 12, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    The researchers behind a new online game are inviting members of the public to look under a virtual microscope and contribute directly to Alzheimer's disease research at Cornell University. Stall Catchers, a game launched this week by the Human Computation Institute , challenges users to scroll through short, black-and-white videos and search for clogged blood vessels within a highlighted area.

    Comment?

  18. The secret of the learning brainRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 10, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    Mushroom-shaped spines on nerve cells. Credit: N. Kasthuri et.al. in 'Saturated reconstruction of a volume of neocortex', Cell , 162 , 648-661, 2015 As we learn, something must change in our brain to store the information.

    Comment?

  19. Kids' consumption of high-calorie drinks at fast-food restaurants tied to combo mealsRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 7, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    A new survey of children's and teenagers' eating habits at fast-food restaurants suggests that consumption levels of sugary drinks are closely tied to their automatic inclusion in "combo meal" packages. According to the NYU Langone Medical Center researchers who led the survey, kids who ate at any of five major fast-food chains consumed 179 more calories on average when their meal deals included soda, sweetened tea or juice, or flavored milks, compared to those who drank non-sweetened beverages or nothing with their food.

    Comment?

  20. New viral vector tool will help expand scope of neural circuit researchRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 7, 2016 | PhysOrg Weblog

    The image shows a section of mouse brain in which scientists have injected rAAV2-retro viruses carrying a red fluorescent protein. The red fluorescent protein labels the long-range output projections between two regions of the brain, the cortex and the pons, located in the brainstem.

    Comment?

Berkeley Job Listings
View or post Berkeley job listings on Topix.
Berkeley Real Estate
News, listings, and foreclosures in Berkeley from Topix.
Berkeley Mortgages
Find mortgage rates in Berkeley on Topix.