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Results 1 - 17 of 17 for "u:livescience.com" in Berkeley, CA

  1. The Size of Your Wine Glass May Affect How Much You DrinkRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jun 7 | LiveScience

    A larger glass of wine - not the amount in the glass, but the size of the glassware itself - might make you drink more. In a new study, researchers found there was a 9.4 percent increase in wine sales when a bar switched to using larger wine glasses.

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  2. Sit, Heel, Compute: Computers Learn Better by Imitating DogsRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jun 6 | Live Science

    From guide dogs for the visually impaired to search-and-rescue animals, canines can be trained to help with a wide range of critical tasks. So, it might come as no surprise that researchers are now designing machines to learn more like dogs.

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  3. Ammonia Swirls Found Beneath Jupiter's CloudsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jun 3 | Live Science

    A new radio map of Jupiter, built with data from the Very Large Array in New Mexico, shows the movement of ammonia gas in the planet's atmosphere. Here, new radio measurements are compared with a visible-light map from Hubble Space Telescope images, in approximate true color.

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  4. The Science of Football: Which Positions Take the Hardest Hits?Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday Jun 3 | Live Science

    These days, a person can't talk about football without bringing up questions about the health effects of hard hits. Evidence is mounting that concussions experienced by players could lead to changes in the brain, including cognitive impairment.

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  5. Surprising Echo of Ancient Irish Horns in Indian InstrumentsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jun 1 | Live Science

    It was a musical link to the past hidden in plain sight: Some modern horns played in India and neighboring regions bear a striking resemblance to ancient Irish instruments that date back to Europe's Bronze and Iron Ages, according to a new study. The comparisons suggest sustained cultural exchange between the two regions, and could help researchers to understand the origins of some Indian instruments and to reconstruct the sounds of ancient Irish music.

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  6. Are We Alone? Scientists Discuss the Search for Life and Odds of E.T.Read the original story w/Photo

    May 12, 2016 | Live Science

    What are the odds that alien life exists elsewhere in the universe? At a major physics meeting, experts talked about updates to historic predictions about whether humans are alone in the cosmos. In 1961, astronomer Frank Drake wrote an equation to quantify the likelihood of finding a technologically advanced civilization elsewhere in the universe.

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  7. New Brain Atlas Reveals Where Words Are StoredRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 29, 2016 | LiveScience

    Credit: Visualizations created by Alexander Huth using pycortex software by James Gao, Mark Lescroart, and Alexander Huth Words and concepts are clustered in very specific regions of the cortex, the outer layer of the brain responsible for most higher-order thinking. For instance, some parts of this brain region light up when people are thinking about violence versus social relationships versus conceptions of time. 1 comment

  8. In a Tight Spot? Robo-Roach Can Flatten Itself to HelpRead the original story w/Photo

    Feb 8, 2016 | Live Science

    Robots that mimic the way cockroaches can scuttle through teeny-tiny cracks might one day help first responders locate and rescue disaster victims trapped in debris, researchers say. Scientists regularly look to nature for inspiration when designing robots , with the hope of learning from millions of years of evolution.

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  9. 11 Body Parts Grown in the LabRead the original story w/Photo

    Jan 26, 2016 | Live Science

    A lab-grown urethra, the duct that conducts urine away from the bladder, and carries semen in male placental mammals. Regrowing a missing limb is no big deal - to a starfish or salamander, creatures that are well-known for using regenerative "superpowers" to replace missing arms and tails.

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  10. Chemicals in Personal Products May Stimulate Cancer More Than ThoughtRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 26, 2015 | LiveScience

    A group of chemicals commonly used in cosmetics and other personal-care products may stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells at doses much lower than previously thought, a new study finds. The study was done on human breast cancer cells growing in lab dishes, and it's unclear whether these chemicals, called parabens, act the same in the human body.

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  11. Chemicals in Personal Products May Stimulate Cancer More Than ThoughtRead the original story w/Photo

    Oct 27, 2015 | Live Science

    A group of chemicals commonly used in cosmetics and other personal-care products may stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells at doses much lower than previously thought, a new study finds. The study was done on human breast cancer cells growing in lab dishes, and it's unclear whether these chemicals, called parabens, act the same in the human body.

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  12. What Scientists Think About the Pope's Climate MessageRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 24, 2015 | Live Science

    As Pope Francis addresses a joint meeting of Congress today , scientists are praising his encyclical on climate change - with a few caveats about population control. A series of editorials published today in the journal Nature Climate Change applaud the pope's in-depth missive for his calls for collective action on warming temperatures, which are driven by fossil-fuel combustion.

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  13. Boxing Mantis Shrimp Prefer Flurry of Hits Over Knockout PunchesRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 23, 2015 | Live Science

    When you're one of nature's greatest pound-for-pound punchers, getting into a dispute over territory or mates can quickly turn ugly. Mantis shrimp are notorious for their clublike front limbs, which they use to kill prey.

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  14. Common Pregnancy Complications Tied to Heart Disease Deaths Later OnRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 21, 2015 | LiveScience

    Pregnant women who experience certain complications related to their pregnancies may have an increased risk of dying from heart disease later in life, a new study suggests. Researchers found that the women in the study who had high levels of sugar in the urine during pregnancy were about four times more likely to die from heart disease over the 50-year study, compared with the women who did not have high levels of sugar in their urine when they were pregnant.

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  15. 120-Million-Year-Old Turtle Fossil Sheds Light on Early EvolutionRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 18, 2015 | Live Science

    The world's oldest sea turtle fossil shows the ancient animal swam the oceans at least 120 million years ago, when dinosaurs still roamed the Earth, according to a recent analysis. The now-extinct Desmatochelys padillai turtle skeleton was found in Villa de Leyva, Colombia, and is 25 million years older than the Santanachelys gaffneyi turtle from Brazil that previously held the record for the world's oldest sea turtle fossil .

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  16. 'Synthetic' Leaves: The Energy Plants of the Future?Read the original story w/Photo

    Sep 3, 2015 | Live Science

    An artist's conception of bacteria wrapping themselves around nanowires to feed on their electrons in the University of California, Berkeley, natural-synthetic photosynthesis system. Alan Brown, writer and blogger for The Kavli Foundation contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights .

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  17. Hidden Blue Paint Found in Ancient Mummy PortraitsRead the original story w/Photo

    Sep 3, 2015 | Live Science

    Egyptian mummy portraits from the second century show no apparent blue in visible light, but do indeed have Egyptian blue pigment, according to scientific analyses. A stash of 1,900-year-old Egyptian mummy paintings that sat mostly undisturbed for 100 years is helping researchers understand how ancient artists used a fashionable pigment called Egyptian blue.

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