Berkeley Newswire

Berkeley Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Berkeley, CA.

Results 1 - 20 of 170 for "u:eurekalert.org" in Berkeley, CA

  1. Pioneering chemist Omar Yaghi wins the Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Basic SciencesRead the original story w/Photo

    19 hrs ago | EurekAlert!

    The BBVA Foundation distinguishes Professor Yaghi of UC Berkeley, leader of a new field of chemistry which can produce new materials with the ability to capture CO2 and harvest water from the atmosphere IMAGE: This is Omar Yaghi, Professor of Chemistry at UC Berkeley, winner of the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Basic Sciences. view Yaghi, Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley , created these materials using a chemistry based on "building bricks" - the jury explains - whose structure responds to a carefully controlled design.

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  2. Reaching the breaking pointRead the original story w/Photo

    19 hrs ago | EurekAlert!

    To better understand why many elderly people are prone to break a bone in a fall , perhaps doctors and researchers should look at the human skeleton in much the same way civil engineers analyze buildings and bridges, according to a new study from a University of Utah mechanical engineering professor. A team of researchers led by U mechanical engineering assistant professor Claire Acevedo believes the bones of an older person, say above the age of 50, become more susceptible to a break due to repeated stress from everyday activities such as walking, creating microdamage that affects the quality of the bone.

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  3. Accurate estimation of biodiversity is now possible on a global scaleRead the original story w/Photo

    19 hrs ago | EurekAlert!

    There is a mismatch between the scale of our policies and biodiversity monitoring on the ground, which is often conducted at very fine scales. We know remarkably little about the diversity of life on Earth, which makes it hard to know with any certainty whether we're succeeding in our efforts to conserve it.

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  4. Moms, sisters, wives rank among more 'difficult' kinRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 17 | EurekAlert!

    Most of us put up with whiners, naggers, control freaks and other annoying people in our lives for good reason - we're related to them. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and Bar-Ilan University in Israel sought to understand the reason people don't just ditch the difficult or demanding people in their families and wider social networks.

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  5. Flu may be spread just by breathing, new UMD-led study showsRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 17 | EurekAlert!

    VIDEO: It is easier to spread the influenza virus than previously thought, according to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . People... view It is easier to spread the influenza virus than previously thought, according to a new University of Maryland-led study released today.

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  6. Recording a thought's fleeting trip through the brainRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 16 | EurekAlert!

    VIDEO: For a more difficult task, saying a word that is the opposite of another word, people's brains required 2-3 seconds to detect , interpret and search for an answer and... view University of California, Berkeley neuroscientists have tracked the progress of a thought through the brain, showing clearly how the prefrontal cortex at the front of the brain coordinates activity to help us act in response to a perception. Recording the electrical activity of neurons directly from the surface of the brain, the scientists found that for a simple task, such as repeating a word presented visually or aurally, the visual and auditory cortexes reacted first to perceive the word.

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  7. New CONIX Research Center to HQ at Carnegie Mellon UniversityRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 15 | EurekAlert!

    Carnegie Mellon University will lead a $27.5 million Semiconductor Research Corporation initiative to build more intelligence into computer networks. Researchers from six U.S. universities will collaborate in the CONIX Research Center headquartered at Carnegie Mellon.

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  8. Prasad Raghavendra, David Steurer to receive Michael and Sheila Held prize from the NASRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 15 | EurekAlert!

    The National Academy of Sciences will award the first annual Michael and Sheila Held Prize to Prasad Raghavendra, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California, Berkeley, and David Steurer, professor of theoretical computer science at ETH Zurich. The pair are receiving the $100,000 prize "for a body of work which revolutionizes our understanding of optimization and complexity" in computer science.

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  9. Goldwasser, Micali, Rivest and Shamir win the Frontiers of Knowledge Award in ICTRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Jan 15 | EurekAlert!

    "Their advanced crypto-protocols enable the safe and secure transmission of electronic data, ranging from e-mail to financial transactions. In addition, their work provides the underpinning for digital signatures, blockchains and crypto-currencies," like Bitcoin.

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  10. BU Medical student wins award at national anesthesiology conferenceRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 10 | EurekAlert!

    Pamela Huang, a fourth-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine , recently received the "Best Scientific and Educational Award" at the 2017 PostGraduate Assembly in Anesthesiology in New York for her presentation on patient safety that combines the use of a book with high-definition video. Her exhibit, "Lessons in Patient Safety: Stories, Analogies and the Multimedia Effect," shared a new approach to teaching complex concepts in patient safety using high-definition video.

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  11. A close-up look at an uncommon underwater eruptionRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 9 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: The remotely operated vehicle Jason lands on the seafloor at Havre submarine volcano to retrieve a heat flow monitor. view On July 18, 2012, passengers on an airline flight over the Southwest Pacific Ocean glimpsed something unusual--a raft of floating rock known as pumice that indicated an underwater volcanic eruption had occurred on the seafloor northeast of New Zealand.

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  12. ICON & GOLD teaming up to explore Earth's interface to spaceRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 3 | EurekAlert!

    VIDEO: From its geostationary orbit, GOLD will have a continual view of Earth and its outer atmosphere. This visualization shows the view of Earth from GOLD.

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  13. 2018 INFORMS Franz Edelman Award finalists selected from leading analytics teams worldwideRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Jan 3 | EurekAlert!

    INFORMS, the leading international association for professionals in operations research and analytics, has selected six finalists for the 47th annual Franz Edelman Award for Achievements in Operations Research and Management Science, the world's most prestigious award for achievement in the practice of analytics and O.R. For more than four decades, winners of the Edelman Award have been recognized for transforming how we approach some of the world's most complex problems. This year's finalists are no exception, with revolutionary contributions to the broadcasting, health, communication, inventory management, vehicle fleet management, and alternative energy industries.

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  14. Which came first: Complex life or high atmospheric oxygen?Read the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Jan 2 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: By measuring the oxidation of iron in pillow basalts from undersea volcanic eruptions, UC Berkeley scientists have more precisely dated the oxygenation of the deep ocean, inferring from that when... view We and all other animals wouldn't be here today if our planet didn't have a lot of oxygen in its atmosphere and oceans. But how crucial were high oxygen levels to the transition from simple, single-celled life forms to the complexity we see today? A study by University of California, Berkeley geochemists presents new evidence that high levels of oxygen were not critical to the origin of animals.

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  15. Wonderful waterRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Dec 25 | EurekAlert!

    We've all seen videos of hot water instantly turning into snow when thrown out of flasks or cups into very cold air. But do you know why is it that this doesn't happen when cold water is thrown instead? Or do you know how water is transported all the way up to the top of a plant, even in very tall trees? How about how to set ice on fire? Or whether water has a memory? Why the maximum density of water is reached at +4oC, and how these unusual properties have many important effects in Nature.

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  16. Protected tropical forests are threatened by the bounty of adjacent oil palm plantationsRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 20, 2017 | EurekAlert!

    A new study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore has warned of the threat that oil palm production poses to tropical forests. Over two decades, the international team of scientists found that oil palm production in Malaysia has an impact beyond the direct loss of habitat.

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  17. New lensless camera creates detailed 3-D images without scanningRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 20, 2017 | EurekAlert!

    VIDEO: The researchers used the DiffuserCam to reconstruct the 3-D structure of leaves from a small plant. The new camera can reconstruct 100 million voxels, or 3-D pixels, from a 1.3-megapixel... view WASHINGTON -- Researchers have developed an easy-to-build camera that produces 3D images from a single 2D image without any lenses.

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  18. Hotter temperatures will accelerate migration of asylum-seekers to Europe, says studyRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 20, 2017 | EurekAlert!

    New research predicts that migrants applying for asylum in the European Union will nearly triple over the average of the last 15 years by 2100 if carbon emissions continue on their current path. The study suggests that cutting emissions could partially stem the tide, but even under an optimistic scenario, Europe could see asylum applications rise by at least a quarter.

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  19. First step toward CRISPR cure of Lou Gehrig's diseaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 19, 2017 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: The UC Berkeley team used an adeno-associated virus to ferry genes for CRISPR-Cas9 into motor neurons to delay onset of symptoms of ALS in mice. view University of California, Berkeley scientists have for the first time used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to disable a defective gene that causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease, in mice, extending their lifespan by 25 percent.

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  20. University of Tokyo International Research Center for Neurointelligence holds first annual symposiumRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 18, 2017 | EurekAlert!

    Despite centuries of inquiry, we still don't know how our intelligence came about. On Sunday, December 17, 2017, researchers at the new University of Tokyo International Research Center for Neurointelligence , held their first annual symposium to kick off a new effort to find out.

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