Berkeley Newswire

Berkeley Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Berkeley, CA.

Results 1 - 20 of 272 for "u:eurekalert.org" in Berkeley, CA

  1. Researchers use jiggly Jell-O to make powerful new hydrogen fuel catalystRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | EurekAlert!

    A cheap and effective new catalyst developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, can generate hydrogen fuel from water just as efficiently as platinum, currently the best -- but also most expensive -- water-splitting catalyst out there. The catalyst, which is composed of nanometer-thin sheets of metal carbide, is manufactured using a self-assembly process that relies on a surprising ingredient: gelatin, the material that gives Jell-O its jiggle.

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  2. Researchers design technology that sees nerve cells fireRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Dec 11 | EurekAlert!

    Researchers at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, have created a noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire based on changes in shape. The method could be used to observe nerve activity in light-accessible parts of the body, such as the eye, which would allow physicians to quantitatively monitor visual function at the cellular level.

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  3. Study suggests improved compliance with the NIH sex as a biological variable policyRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Dec 11 | EurekAlert!

    In 2016, the National Institutes of Health implemented a policy which requires grant applicants to "consider sex as a biological variable " in vertebrate animal and human studies. A new study surveyed NIH study section members in 2016 and 2017 regarding their attitudes toward the policy and found that a majority of respondents thought that it was important to consider SABV in the experimental design and that considering SABV would improve the rigor and reproducibility of NIH-funded preclinical research.

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  4. Dopamine's yin-yang personality: It's an upper and a downerRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Dec 9 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: UC Berkeley researchers have discovered that the brain neurotransmitter dopamine has a yin-yang personality, mediating both pleasure and pain. view For decades, psychologists have viewed the neurotransmitter dopamine as a double-edged sword: released in the brain as a reward to train us to seek out pleasurable experiences, but also a "drug" the constant pursuit of which leads to addiction.

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  5. Study highlights correlations between violent death and substance useRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Dec 6 | EurekAlert!

    Consumption of alcohol or at least one drug was associated with over half the violent deaths that occurred in Sao Paulo City in the period analyzed IMAGE: Consumption of alcohol or at least one drug was associated with over half the violent deaths that occurred in So Paulo City in the period analyzed. view A group of researchers at the University of Sao Paulo's Medical School in Brazil recently published the results of a study on the links between alcohol and drug use and the occurrence of violent deaths.

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  6. Watch how geckos run across waterRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Dec 5 | EurekAlert!

    Geckos run across water at up to almost a meter a second using a unique mix of surface tension and slapping, say researchers reporting December 6 in the journal Current Biology . They found that the mouse-sized lizards are too big to float on water using only surface tension, like insects, but too small to use only foot slapping, like basilisks.

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  7. Acrobatic geckos, highly maneuverable on land and in the air, can also race on waterRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Dec 5 | EurekAlert!

    VIDEO: Video showing a house gecko running on water. The head and body are held high above the water and the limbs fully exit the water.

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  8. Biologists show inner workings of cellular 'undertaker'Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Dec 3 | EurekAlert!

    One of a cell's most important responsibilities is to break down and recycle proteins that are no longer needed or endanger the cell. This task is carried out by a cellular nanomachine called the proteasome.

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  9. How microbial interactions shape our livesRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Dec 3 | EurekAlert!

    The interactions that take place between the species of microbes living in the gastrointestinal system often have large and unpredicted effects on health, according to new work from a team led by Carnegie's Will Ludington. Their findings are published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .

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  10. As married couples age, humor replaces bickeringRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Dec 2 | EurekAlert!

    Honeymoon long over? Hang in there. A new University of California, Berkeley, study shows those prickly disagreements that can mark the early and middle years of marriage mellow with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance.

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  11. Prenatal exposure to chemicals in personal care products may speed puberty in girlsRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Dec 2 | EurekAlert!

    Girls exposed to chemicals commonly found in toothpaste, makeup, soap and other personal care products before birth may hit puberty earlier, according to a new longitudinal study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. The results, which were published Dec. 4 in the journal Human Reproduction , came from data collected as part of the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas study, which followed 338 children from before birth to adolescence to document how early environmental exposures affect childhood development.

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  12. A new approach to studying the fluRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Dec 2 | EurekAlert!

    Scientists have known for decades that a flu virus in a human body can be a lot different than viruses grown in a lab. As opposed to the uniform, spherical, textbook-style viruses in a petri dish, in humans they vary in shape and composition -- particularly the abundance of certain proteins -- even if they are genetically very similar.

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  13. New quantum materials could take computing devices beyond the semiconductor eraRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Dec 2 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: Single crystals of the multiferroic material bismuth-iron-oxide. The bismuth atoms form a cubic lattice with oxygen atoms at each face of the cube and an iron atom ... view Researchers from Intel Corp. and the University of California, Berkeley, are looking beyond current transistor technology and preparing the way for a new type of memory and logic circuit that could someday be in every computer on the planet.

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  14. Living electrodes with bacteria and organic electronicsRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Nov 25 | EurekAlert!

    Adding bacteria to electrochemical systems is often an environmentally sensitive means to convert chemical energy to electricity. Applications include water purification, bioelectronics, biosensors, and for the harvesting and storage of energy in fuel cells.

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  15. CRADA boom spurs innovation, collaboration with Sandia LabsRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Nov 20 | EurekAlert!

    Sandia National Laboratories signed more Cooperative Research and Development Agreements this past fiscal year than in any previous year this century, sparking dozens of new collaborations and potential technological innovations. "Sandia is out there helping companies and fulfilling the Department of Energy tech transfer mission," he said.

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  16. To predict the future, the brain uses two clocksRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Nov 19 | EurekAlert!

    That moment when you step on the gas pedal a split second before the light changes, or when you tap your toes even before the first piano note of Camila Cabello's "Havana" is struck. That's anticipatory timing.

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  17. Freeze-frame microscopy captures molecule's 'lock-and-load' on DNARead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Nov 18 | EurekAlert!

    IMAGE: The transcription factor IID complex locks onto DNA, checks it's in the right place and then recruits other proteins to start transcribing DNA into RNA. New advances in cryo-EM allowed... view Pushing the limits of cryo-electron microscopy, University of California, Berkeley, scientists have captured freeze-frames of the changing shape of a huge molecule, one of the body's key molecular machines, as it locks onto DNA and loads the machinery for reading the genetic code.

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  18. As climate and land-use change accelerate, so must efforts to preserve California's plantsRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Nov 18 | EurekAlert!

    As the IPCC warns that we have only 12 years to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by nearly half or risk significantly greater impacts from climate change, University of California, Berkeley, scientists are charting the best course to save California's native plants from these human threats. "We just have a decade or two given the rapid pace of climate and land-use change," said Brent Mishler, a UC Berkeley professor of integrative biology and director of the University and Jepson Herbaria.

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  19. Playing high school football changes the teenage brainRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Nov 15 | EurekAlert!

    A single season of high school football may be enough to cause microscopic changes in the structure of the brain, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The researchers used a new type of magnetic resonance imaging to take brain scans of 16 high school players, ages 15 to 17, before and after a season of football.

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  20. Earth's magnetic field measured using artificial stars at 90 kilometers altitudeRead the original story w/Photo

    Nov 13, 2018 | EurekAlert!

    An international collaboration uses laser-generated stars to determine the Earth's magnetic field in the sodium layer of the atmosphere IMAGE: The experiment on La Palma: The laser beam generates an artificial guide star in the mesosphere. This light is collected in the receiver telescope .

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