Berkeley Newswire

Berkeley Newswire

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Results 1 - 20 of 46 for "u:cen.acs.org" in Berkeley, CA

  1. DIC and Checkerspot collaborate on polyolsRead the original story

    Sunday May 20 | Chemical & Engineering News

    The Japanese ink and pigment maker DIC is working with Checkerspot, which recently emerged from the Illumina Accelerator business incubator, to develop new polyols. The two will focus on polyol-based adhesives, coatings, inks, and lubricants using Checkerspot's research facilities in Berkeley, Calif.

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  2. Fetching fluoride with hydrogen bondingRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday May 11 | Chemical and Engineering News

    Enantioselective nucleophilic fluorination reaction takes place with retention of configuration via double displacement-first by sulfur to form a symmetrical episulfonium-ion intermediate and then by fluoride guided to one side of that ion. As fantastic a nucleophile as fluoride is, when it's tied up in an inorganic salt, such as CsF or KF, the anion becomes a recalcitrant reagent for organic synthesis because these salts are insoluble in many organic solvents.

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  3. CRISPR diagnostics company Mammoth launchesRead the original story

    Sunday May 6 | Chemical & Engineering News

    Mammoth Biosciences is the latest biotech start-up to launch centered on CRISPR gene-editing technology. Rather than use CRISPR as a therapy, Mammoth plans to develop diagnostics that use CRISPR to detect diseases, including bacterial and viral infections, cancer, and genetic conditions.

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  4. Actinide acts as electron donor for first timeRead the original story

    Wednesday May 2 | Chemical & Engineering News

    A new thorium-aluminum complex is the first in which an actinide element donates electrons when bonding with a metal . The complex, synthesized by John Arnold of the University of California, Berkeley, and colleagues, is already unusual because of its Th oxidation state.

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  5. Clear view of telomerase at lastRead the original story

    Sunday Apr 29 | Chemical & Engineering News

    The enzyme telomerase, which restores chromosome ends shortened by cell division, was discovered over three decades ago, but no view of the human enzyme at atomic resolution, approximately 3 A..., has been captured. The problem is that telomerase is present in cells in tiny quantities and is not easily purified.

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  6. Novartis and Berkeley researchers team up to tackle the industry's toughest drug targetsRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 18, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    In early 2017, John Tallarico and his team at Novartis started keeping tabs on intriguing research bubbling up in a handful of academic labs. Chemical biologists were reporting advances in a method for finding nooks and crannies on proteins for tethering drugs.

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  7. Rocks are a missing piece of the nitrogen cycleRead the original story w/Photo

    Apr 5, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    The Pinnacles at Gunung Mulu National Park in Borneo are made from limestone that can weather and release nitrogen into the soil. Nitrogen gets around on Earth.

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  8. Looking for cheaper routes to malaria medicinesRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 12, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    In 2016, malaria killed an estimated 445,000 people, 90% of them in Africa. That's one death every 71 seconds, caused by a disease that is both preventable and treatable.

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  9. Omar Yaghi receives award in basic sciencesRead the original story

    Feb 5, 2018 | Chemical and Engineering News

    Omar Yaghi, a chemistry professor at the University of California, Berkeley, is the recipient of the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Basic Sciences. Yaghi is being honored for his pioneering work in synthesizing new crystalline materials, metal-organic frameworks, and covalent organic frameworks of major impact in science and engineering.

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  10. Meet Geraldine Richmond, 2018 Priestley MedalistRead the original story

    Mar 19, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    On her path to success in physical chemistry, Geri Richmond has never stopped working to pull others up with her The 2018 Priestley Medalist, Geraldine Richmond, made her mark with insights about how molecules behave at the air-water and oil-water interfaces, but her contributions extend far beyond the lab. She helped found COACh, an organization dedicated to giving women skills for successful science careers; served on the National Science Board; and traveled as a science envoy in Southeast Asia for the U.S. State Department.

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  11. Looking for cheaper routes to malaria medicinesRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 12, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    A photochemical process developed by Sanofi and now operated by Huvepharma in Garessio, Italy, can produce 370-kg batches of artemisinin. A photochemical process developed by Sanofi and now operated by Huvepharma in Garessio, Italy, can produce 370-kg batches of artemisinin.

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  12. For arthropod escape artists, survival depends on sizeRead the original story

    Mar 12, 2018 | Today's Chemist At Work

    Shinji Sugiura caught his crawly contenders at night. Long after tourists left the forest trails in central Japan, the Kobe University biologist collected bombardier beetles, along with their natural predators, the sticky-tongued toads, to see which bugs were best suited for survival.

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  13. Makoto Fujita and Omar Yaghi win Wolf Prize in ChemistryRead the original story

    Mar 5, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    For their pioneering work on metal-organic frameworks and porous polymers, Makoto Fujita of the University of Tokyo and Omar Yaghi of the University of California, Berkeley, have been awarded the 2018 Wolf Prize in Chemistry. The $100,000 prizes are awarded annually by the Israel-based Wolf Foundation for outstanding work in the fields of agriculture, chemistry, mathematics, medicine, physics, and rotating disciplines in the arts.

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  14. Business RoundupRead the original story

    Feb 12, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    Enerkem , a waste-to-biofuels developer based in Montreal, has raised $223 million in a third round of funding to support new facilities. The funds include $100 million in a previously announced deal with China's Sinobioway; the round also brought in BlackRock and existing investors.

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  15. Omar Yaghi receives award in basic sciencesRead the original story

    Feb 5, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    Between noon ET Thursday, March 29, and noon ET Friday, March 30, the commenting function will be unavailable while our site undergoes maintenance to improve your digital experience. Check out C&EN's fresh new look and new ways to discover our daily coverage of the chemistry enterprise, our latest videos and podcasts, and all of our award-winning feature-length chemistry reporting.

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  16. Evolved enzymes serve up diverse cyclopropanesRead the original story

    Mar 2, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    With some engineering in the lab, a quartet of iron-containing heme proteins from microbes can convert inert alkenes into each possible stereoisomer of cyclopropanes, which are valuable motifs in medicinally active compounds . Previous engineered proteins needed help from an artificial cofactor to complete this feat.

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  17. Polymer chain wraps up proteins to keep them stableRead the original story

    Mar 18, 2018 | Chemical and Engineering News

    The methacrylate heteropolymer consists of four monomers with different chemical properties that interact with several types of hydrophobic and hydrophilic patches on protein surfaces. The methacrylate heteropolymer consists of four monomers with different chemical properties that interact with several types of hydrophobic and hydrophilic patches on protein surfaces.

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  18. Care for a glass of fresh-brewed mammoth milk?Read the original story w/Photo

    Mar 12, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    Perfect Day's fermentation process can make the milk proteins of several different animals including echidna, also known as spiny anteaters. Perfect Day's fermentation process can make the milk proteins of several different animals including echidna, also known as spiny anteaters.

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  19. Interest in targeted protein degraders continues in new partnership between Celgene and VividionRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 11, 2018 | Chemical & Engineering News

    In another sign of growing pharmaceutical industry interest in targeted protein degradation, Celgene will pay Vividion Therapeutics $101 million in a four-year pact to develop small-molecule drugs for cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Vividion was founded in 2014 and raised its first $50 million last year.

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  20. Evolved enzymes serve up diverse cyclopropanesRead the original story

    Feb 28, 2018 | Chemical and Engineering News

    With some engineering in the lab, a quartet of iron-containing heme proteins from microbes can convert inert alkenes into each possible stereoisomer of cyclopropanes, which are valuable motifs in medicinally active compounds . Previous engineered proteins needed help from an artificial cofactor to complete this feat.

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