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Archaeology News

News on Archaeology continually updated from thousands of sources around the net.

1 hr ago | Independent.ie

Tributes for forensic archaeologist who helped families of IRA 'Disappeared'

John McIlwaine, a forensic archaeologist with the University of Bradford who died suddenly last night at the age of 49. University of Bradford/PA Wire Tributes have been paid to the top archeologist who helped bring closure to the anguished families of Northern Ireland 's Disappeared. John McIlwaine, had led the team of excavators searching clandestine graves to find the bodies of people who were kidnapped, killed and secretly buried by the IRA during the 1970s and 80s.

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Related Topix: Anthropology, Science, IRA, Personal Finance, Irish Republican Army, Bradford, PA, Armagh County, Northern Ireland, World News, United Kingdom

1 hr ago | RTE.ie

Archaeologist who helped find 'Disappeared' dies

Tributes have been paid to the top archaeologist who helped bring closure to the anguished families of Northern Ireland's Disappeared. The academic, who grew up in Portadown, Co Armagh had led the team of excavators searching clandestine graves to find the bodies of people who were kidnapped, killed and secretly buried by the IRA during the 1970s and 80s.

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Related Topix: Anthropology, Science, Ireland, Europe, World News, Armagh County, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, Irish Republican Army

1 hr ago | ABC News

This Couple Has Been Holding Hands for 700 Years

Archaeologists from the University of Leicester Archaeological Services have uncovered the 14th century remains of a man and a woman buried with their arms crossed - as if they were holding hands - outside the village of Hallaton in east Leicestershire, England. Archaeologists with the University of Leicester uncovered remains of two skeletons holding hands believed to have been resting that way for at least 700 years.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

3 hrs ago | Hucknall and Bulwell Dispatch

Second phase of Edwinstowe dig announced

The next phase of an archaeological dig in Edwinstowe which organisers hope will prove people lived in the village in the seventh century has been announced. The second phase of excavations on the Robin Hood's Village Volunteer Dig will run from Sunday 26th to Friday 31st October.

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Related Topix: United Kingdom, Nottinghamshire County, England, Anthropology, Science

3 hrs ago | Jerusalem Post

Archaeological Survey of Israel celebrates 50th anniversary

The Archaeological Survey of Israel, one of the largest scientific projects ever undertaken in the country, will celebrate its 50th anniversary Thursday at Tel Aviv University by holding a meeting among the nation's first surveyors and their present-day counterparts. To celebrate the milestone, the organization will inaugurate a free, voluminous online database containing 15,000 sites, which for the first time will provide accessibility at the touch of a button to extensive professional information about the country's many archaeological sites.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

5 hrs ago | Jerusalem Post

Gas chambers at Sobibor death camp uncovered in archaeological dig

Some 250,000 Jews murdered at camp in Poland which Nazis bulldozed and covered up with trees to conceal their crimes; personal effects of victims, including wedding rings found near gas chambers. An archaeological dig in Poland has revealed the location of the gas chambers at the Sobibor death camp, Yad Vashem announced on Wednesday.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

5 hrs ago | Fox News

High-tech metal diving suit

The high-tech Exosuit is being put to good use this month: Marine archaeologists will use the metal diving outfit to explore the famous Antikythera shipwreck off the coast of Greece. A group of marine archaeologists kicked off a mission this week to explore an ancient shipwreck at the bottom of the Aegean Sea not with a sub, but with a semi-robotic metal diving suit that looks likes it was taken straight out of a James Bond movie.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

7 hrs ago | Alabama Live

Archaeologists peel back layers of Alabama's human history near Northern Beltline

Steps from workers blasting, moving, grading and molding steep hills along Self Creek into highway-level terrain, there's a piece yet untouched by Northern Beltline construction . There, a layer of Hartselle sandstone -- formed and hardened by eons of geological forces -- breaks the surface at a steep angle.

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Related Topix: Alabama, Anthropology, Science, Hartselle, AL, Pinson, AL, Moundville, AL

8 hrs ago | Israellycool

Israel: From Goldstone To Old Stone

Archaeologists have long known about the massive 150 meter-long landmark near the Israeli city of Safed . But it wasn't until recent work carried out by Ido Wachtel, a doctoral student at theHebrew University of Jerusalem, that the structure was identified as a 5,000-year-old crescent-shaped stone monument.

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Related Topix: Anthropology, Science, Israel, World News,

12 hrs ago | Halstead Gazette

Day to discover the secrets of the river

HISTORY'S mysteries can endure, yet some of the River Thames' most well-kept secrets are set to be raised and shared thanks to a special event organised by Southend Museums. Museums chiefs are to host a day dedicated to sharing information about the archeological enigmas which lie beneath the murky waters of the Thames Estuary, including the now famous London shipwreck.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

Tue Sep 16, 2014

ABC News

Oxford Hotel site open for inspection as archaeological dig continues

Before the site of the Oxford Tavern makes way for a $38m residential complex, archaeologist Alexander Beben has been leading a team digging up the past on the Wollongong site that is telling stories from the 1850s. The dig site was open to the public today as hundreds of people were able to walk onto the scant remains of the old Oxford Tavern in Wollongong's CBD.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

North Kitsap Herald

'Salish Bounty: Traditional Native American Foods of Puget Sound' opens Oct. 25

The Suquamish Museum presents a new exhibit from the Burke Museum, "Salish Bounty: Traditional Native American Foods of Puget Sound," Oct. 25 to Dec. 31. Focusing on the revival of traditional Native foods, "Salish Bounty" is co-curated by Burke Museum archaeologists and Coast Salish advisers. "Salish Bounty"- comprised of historic photo images, map, and informative text printed on free-standing banners - reminds the viewer that food isn't solitary; cooking and eating are things we do with other people and express our cultural history and values.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

CNN

King Richard III's bones reveal fatal blows, study says

British scientists announced on February 4 that they were convinced "beyond reasonable doubt" that a skeleton found during an archaeological dig in Leicester, England, in August 2012 is that of King Richard III, who was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. Mitochondrial DNA extracted from the bones was matched to Michael Ibsen, a Canadian cabinetmaker and direct descendant of Richard III's sister, Anne of York.

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Related Topix: Leicestershire County, England, World News, United Kingdom, Science, Anthropology

Health.com

Modern Forensics Provides Clues to Death of Richard III

Modern forensic techniques are shedding light on a 500-year-old mystery: Which battlefield injuries might have killed King Richard III, the last English monarch to die in battle? A new analysis of the king's skeletal remains, using whole-body CT scans and micro-CT imaging of injured bones, provides a detailed account of the 11 injuries he suffered at the Battle of Bosworth Field, where he died on Aug. 22, 1485. The modern forensics revealed that two skull injuries could have killed the king in a short amount of time, according to a new report published Sept.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

Archaeology

Bog Body Uncovered in Ireland's County Meath

Utility workers discovered the lower leg bones of an adult in Rossan Bog. "The exact date of the remains is not known at this time but we will be conducting research in the coming months," archaeologist Maeve Sikora of the National Museum of Ireland told The Irish Examiner .

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

ABC News

Egypt Says Restoration of Oldest Pyramid on Track

Egypt's antiquities minister took journalists inside a 4,600-year-old pyramid on Tuesday to reject recent accusations of mismanagement at the site as false and "without evidence." At a press conference at the Saqqara pyramid complex, some 30 kilometers south of Cairo, Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh el-Damaty decried recent media reports alleging that the Djoser pyramid might collapse.

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Related Topix: Travel, Egypt Travel, Middle East Travel, Anthropology, Science

TheBlaze.com

Huge Stone Structure Possibly Older than Stonehenge Identified Near Sea of Galilee

News of archaeological discoveries dated to the times of the Bible are fairly common in Israel, but new research about a massive stone structure found in northern Israel suggests a far older find. An Israeli researcher believes that a 5,000-year-old stone structure was possibly used to designate ancient property rights.

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Related Topix: Anthropology, Science, Israel, World News, Middle East, US Politics, US News

BreakingNews.ie

New bog body discovered in Meath

Archaeologists from the National Museum of Ireland have confirmed that it is working on a find of human remains in a bog near the border with Co Westmeath, although the exact site has not yet been named. "Archaeologists and conservators from The National Museum of Ireland have been on site investigating the findspot of archaeological human remains in a bog in Co.

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Related Topix: Science, Anthropology

The Bennington Banner

Robinson hired as new Vermont state archaeologist

Jess Robinson is Vermont's new State Archaeologist. He is the second State Archaeologist to serve Vermont, since the General Assembly established the position in 1976.

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Related Topix: Vermont, Vermont Government, Anthropology, Science, Burlington, VT, SUNY Albany

Mon Sep 15, 2014

Science Daily

Creation of the Vuoksi River preceded a significant cultural shift

The creation of the Vuoksi River and the subsequent rapid decrease in the water level of Lake Saimaa approximately 6,000 years ago revealed thousands of square kilometers of new, fertile land in eastern Finland. Researchers have studied the role that the decrease in water levels has played in the interaction between nature and humans.

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Related Topix: Europe, Finland, World News, Anthropology, Science

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