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Sneads, FL

Poll: Most Floridians will vote to ban same-sex marriage

It doesn't really matter because soon same-sex marriage will become the law of the land because this is America -- home of the brave, and I have nothing to fear about homosexuals civil rights!  (Nov 26, 2010 | post #241)

North Adams, MA

Who do you support for Lieutenant Governor in Massachuset...

I am voting for Deval Patrick/Tim Murray because I know the difference between a disappointing friend and a deadly enemy!  (Oct 15, 2010 | post #3)

Adams, MA

MA Sales Tax Relief Act, Question 3

Why I believe it is a wise decision to vote "NO" on ballot Question #3 Sales and Use Tax Rates: Voting "yes" to reduce the Massachusetts tax rate to 3% is not only unwise but would also be foolish at this crucial point within this current recovery of the economy of our Commonwealth. Our roads and bridges, our infrastructure, are dangerous if not deadly and are in dire need to our immediate attention. A "yes" vote will make repairing our infrastucture practically impossible for how will we pay the workers? We also have to have all of that snow cleared off of our highways and streets too. A "yes" vote will cause less money to funnel into that (for salt, for sand, and for deicer materials) and could very well domino into less people employed to plow away that snow as quickly and efficiently as usual within a possible wintry storm emergency. Some towns are already calling for other towns' fire departments to respond to burning buildings that are out of control because they just do not have enough resources to extinguish the fire alone (Lawrence, MA - A fire that broke out at a building at 65 Park St. on June 26, 2010 became a four alarm blaze. The City of Lawrence had recently been hit with budget cuts, which made assistance from other towns necessary. The city is currently staffed with only 3 engines and a ladder due to these cuts). A "yes" vote will literally bring the roof down on the fire departments (especially in the smaller towns) and you will witness more fire station closures than ever before due to budget cuts, and there will also be less police on the beat to protect you and/or your children and the rest of your family and your community in general (especially in the smaller towns) as well. Some of our cities and towns are undergoing library and school closures because of the country's past economic recession; the lucky ones that remained open resulted in eliminating staff, like teachers, and/or reducing the hours of which they are open. A "yes" vote would definitely call for less teachers and increasingly crowded classrooms where students are most likely to receive the attention and education that they deserve due to cutbacks. MassHealth, Commonwealth Care, has already had cutbacks to make of its own because of the number of people who depend upon them now (some unemployed who cannot find work and some *disabled* who are *unable* to work and the *elderly* that MassHealth also assists [in addition to their Medicare] will endure further unfortunate setbacks). A "yes" vote would further devastate their lives and some chances of recovery, howbeit financial and/or medical where lives might have been saved. Also let us not forget about all of the people who are currently receiving (or will receive) food stamp assistance, or, fuel assistance during the cold and wintry months; these people who live at or below the poverty line will go hungry and children will go hungry too due to cutbacks that will be foisted upon the food stamp division resulting in people, in familes receiving less food stamps a month. The disabled and the elderly of our communities will have to invent new ways to try to survive and to stay as warm as some of us do during the winter because they will no longer be able to afford heating like some others can, hopefully not dying in the process (as they had before). It is obvious what a "yes" vote would result to the least of us... [CONTINUES]  (Oct 9, 2010 | post #18)

Adams, MA

MA Sales Tax Relief Act, Question 3

Why I believe it is a wise decision to vote "NO" on ballot Question #3 Sales and Use Tax Rates: Furthermore, if you are not convinced yet to vote "NO" with me on Question #3, the Massachusetts Government will just invent new ways to try to make up for the $2.5 billion that would be lost in our state's revenue. Perhaps Massachusetts will do something similar to what New York has recently done and create a tax on clothing(?). Perhaps our cities and towns will raise vehicle excise taxes in order for them to prepare for wintry storm emergencies, forgetting about restoring our streets and bridges. Maybe just perhaps they will decide to raise property taxes as well. The bottom line is that this is America and in America you are taxed. Of course, nobody likes paying taxes (especially newly invented taxes), but in America our taxes pay for things such as what I have mentioned in Part One. In America, our taxes support our schools, our fire departments, our police forces -- the bottom line, our taxes support us! This is just how America operates. We, here in Massachusetts, can be thankful that we are not in the same boat as some states like California. I can certainly understand why sustaining a 6.25% sales tax is vital to the best interests of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. So, I am voting "NO" on ballot Question #3 Sales and Use Tax Rates, and I hope you agree to vote "NO" too.  (Oct 9, 2010 | post #17)

Adams, MA

MA Sales Tax Relief Act, Question 3

Why I believe it is a wise decision to vote "NO" on ballot Question #3 Sales and Use Tax Rates: Voting "yes" to reduce the Massachusetts tax rate to 3% is not only unwise but would also be foolish at this crucial point within this current recovery of the economy of our Commonwealth. Our roads and bridges, our infrastructure, are dangerous if not deadly and are in dire need to our immediate attention. A "yes" vote will make repairing our infrastucture practically impossible for how will we pay the workers? We also have to have all of that snow cleared off of our highways and streets too. A "yes" vote will cause less money to funnel into that (for salt, for sand, and for deicer materials) and could very well domino into less people employed to plow away that snow as quickly and efficiently as usual within a possible wintry storm emergency. Some towns are already calling for other towns' fire departments to respond to burning buildings that are out of control because they just do not have enough resources to extinguish the fire alone (Lawrence, MA - A fire that broke out at a building at 65 Park St. on June 26, 2010 became a four alarm blaze. The City of Lawrence had recently been hit with budget cuts, which made assistance from other towns necessary. The city is currently staffed with only 3 engines and a ladder due to these cuts). A "yes" vote will literally bring the roof down on the fire departments (especially in the smaller towns) and you will witness more fire station closures than ever before due to budget cuts, and there will also be less police on the beat to protect you and/or your children and the rest of your family and your community in general (especially in the smaller towns) as well. Some of our cities and towns are undergoing library and school closures because of the country's past economic recession; the lucky ones that remained open resulted in eliminating staff, like teachers, and/or reducing the hours of which they are open. A "yes" vote would definitely call for less teachers and increasingly crowded classrooms where students are most likely to receive the attention and education that they deserve due to cutbacks. MassHealth, Commonwealth Care, has already had cutbacks to make of its own because of the number of people who depend upon them now (some unemployed who cannot find work and some *disabled* who are *unable* to work and the *elderly* that MassHealth also assists [in addition to their Medicare] will endure further unfortunate setbacks). A "yes" vote would further devastate their lives and some chances of recovery, howbeit financial and/or medical where lives might have been saved. Also let us not forget about all of the people who are currently receiving (or will receive) food stamp assistance, or, fuel assistance during the cold and wintry months; these people who live at or below the poverty line will go hungry and children will go hungry too due to cutbacks that will be foisted upon the food stamp division resulting in people, in familes receiving less food stamps a month. The disabled and the elderly of our communities will have to invent new ways to try to survive and to stay as warm as some of us do during the winter because they will no longer be able to afford heating like some others can, hopefully not dying in the process (as they had before). It is obvious what a "yes" vote would result to the least of us... [CONTINUES  (Oct 9, 2010 | post #16)

Adams, MA

Question 3 Sales and Use Tax Rates (Part 2)

Why I believe it is a wise decision to vote "NO" on ballot Question #3 Sales and Use Tax Rates: Furthermore, if you are not convinced yet to vote "NO" with me on Question #3, the Massachusetts Government will just invent new ways to try to make up for the $2.5 billion that would be lost in our state's revenue. Perhaps Massachusetts will do something similar to what New York has recently done and create a tax on clothing(?). Perhaps our cities and towns will raise vehicle excise taxes in order for them to prepare for wintry storm emergencies, forgetting about restoring our streets and bridges. Maybe just perhaps they will decide to raise property taxes as well. The bottom line is that this is America and in America you are taxed. Of course, nobody likes paying taxes (especially newly invented taxes), but in America our taxes pay for things such as what I have mentioned in Part One. In America, our taxes support our schools, our fire departments, our police forces -- the bottom line, our taxes support us! This is just how America operates. We, here in Massachusetts, can be thankful that we are not in the same boat as some states like California. I can certainly understand why sustaining a 6.25% sales tax is vital to the best interests of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. So, I am voting "NO" on ballot Question #3 Sales and Use Tax Rates, and I hope you agree too.  (Oct 8, 2010 | post #1)

Adams, MA

Question 3 Sales And Use Tax Rates (Part 1)

Why I believe it is a wise decision to vote "NO" on ballot Question #3 Sales and Use Tax Rates: Voting "yes" to reduce the Massachusetts tax rate to 3% is not only unwise but would also be foolish at this crucial point within this current recovery of the economy of our Commonwealth. Our roads and bridges, our infrastructure, are dangerous if not deadly and are in dire need to our immediate attention. A "yes" vote will make repairing our infrastucture practically impossible for how will we pay the workers? We also have to have all of that snow cleared off of our highways and streets too. A "yes" vote will cause less money to funnel into that (for salt, for sand, and for deicer materials) and could very well domino into less people employed to plow away that snow as quickly and efficiently as usual within a possible wintry storm emergency. Some towns are already calling for other towns' fire departments to respond to burning buildings that are out of control because they just do not have enough resources to extinguish the fire alone (Lawrence, MA - A fire that broke out at a building at 65 Park St. on June 26, 2010 became a four alarm blaze. The City of Lawrence had recently been hit with budget cuts, which made assistance from other towns necessary. The city is currently staffed with only 3 engines and a ladder due to these cuts). A "yes" vote will literally bring the roof down on the fire departments (especially in the smaller towns) and you will witness more fire station closures than ever before due to budget cuts, and there will also be less police on the beat to protect you and/or your children and the rest of your family and your community in general (especially in the smaller towns) as well. Some of our cities and towns are undergoing library and school closures because of the country's past economic recession; the lucky ones that remained open resulted in eliminating staff, like teachers, and/or reducing the hours of which they are open. A "yes" vote would definitely call for less teachers and increasingly crowded classrooms where students are most likely to receive the attention and education that they deserve due to cutbacks. MassHealth, Commonwealth Care, has already had cutbacks to make of its own because of the number of people who depend upon them now (some unemployed who cannot find work and some *disabled* who are *unable* to work and the *elderly* that MassHealth also assists [in addition to their Medicare] will endure further unfortunate setbacks). A "yes" vote would further devastate their lives and some chances of recovery, howbeit financial and/or medical where lives might have been saved. Also let us not forget about all of the people who are currently receiving (or will receive) food stamp assistance, or, fuel assistance during the cold and wintry months; these people who live at or below the poverty line will go hungry and children will go hungry too due to cutbacks that will be foisted upon the food stamp division resulting in people, in familes receiving less food stamps a month. The disabled and the elderly of our communities will have to invent new ways to try to survive and to stay as warm as some of us do during the winter because they will no longer be able to afford heating like some others can, hopefully not dying in the process (as they had before). It is obvious what a "yes" vote would result to the least of us... [CONTINUES]  (Oct 8, 2010 | post #1)

Sneads, FL

Barack Obama, our next President

Obamacare" was based on Massachusetts MassHealth. You will only be taxed if you DO NOT have health care and if you do have health care then you will receive a tax CREDIT; you speak in half truths. Too bad the Republicans stripped the public option away from the bill which was meant to assist the rest of Americans who are uninsured and to provide the insurance industry with the competition needed to keep their premiums DOWN! Also, it is the uninsured which cause higher premiums because somebody's gotta pay the medical industry when the uninisured one cannot. Oh well, good luck to all of you living outside of Massachusetts. MassHealth is strong and Massachusetts is no longer in a recession status that came down on the country due to Bush's two unpaid wars while providing tax cuts to the rich. So, middle-class taxes are the lowest today under President Obama since President Dwight D. Eisenhower!  (Sep 30, 2010 | post #207049)

Sneads, FL

Barack Obama, our next President

I kiss the ground that I live in New England now even though as "cold" and snowy and icy and "miserable " you might think it is here; it beats living with the crude and miserable people down there who spew nothing but their hatred for all and one another!  (Sep 30, 2010 | post #207033)

Sneads, FL

Barack Obama, our next President

FLAW-I-DuH sucks -- all of it!!!  (Sep 30, 2010 | post #207024)

Sneads, FL

Barack Obama, our next President

I am thrilled to high heaven that I no longer live with you ignorant, rude and miserable people anymore!  (Sep 30, 2010 | post #207019)