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Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.6: The Sky Outside the 4th Fl...

Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.6: The Sky Outside the 4th Floor Looks White Wei Liu June 2013 I become 5 in 1975 in Chongqing, China. “Wei, Mom is going to the countryside campus. Do you like to go with me?” Mom asks me. “Mom, I’m willing to go with you,” I say. Of course, I’m willing to be with my Mom. This is my Mom’s high school to enact the policy of Mao Zedong that the students go to the country to learn from the peasants, and the same is with the teachers like my Mom. No. 52 High School of Chongqing, China, where my Mom works, has established a countryside campus. I feel quite excited. I’m leaving the current living place for a while. I don’t know for how long. Even my Mom does not know. I have never been to the countryside. I only hear the acquaintances of my Mom and Dad, coming from the countryside, say to them when leaving, “Someday when you have time, you can come and visit us in the countryside. The air in the countryside is fresh.” I have no idea of fresh air. Maybe it is a good thing. I like imagining. Let me imagine what goodness may be in the countryside campus. Are there many trees? Maybe. Is there the grassland I see in the movie? Maybe. Are there hills? Maybe. Are there bad things? I don’t know. Maybe. When my Mom talks about it to me, there is no smile on her face. She likes smiling. I don’t see why she does so. In my daily life, I never see many pleasant things. On the contrary, I often want to cry, but dare not. I know my Dad and Mom dislike it. I’ve never seen my Mom cry. Before long, I see the real face of the countryside campus. The place My Mom and I arrive is called Sanxikou, meaning 3-Creek Pass, located on the west bank of Jialing River, about 22 miles north to Lianglukou, Urban District, Chongqing, where my home and my Dad’s hospital is, and it’s about 9 miles south to Beipei District. To me, the distance is truly far. I have no idea of how to return home. The countryside campus is a product of Mao Zedong’s policy that the students go to the countryside to learn from the peasant. The building here is also made of bricks, with students and teachers going in and out. The only difference between here and the city campus is that here the building is made of gray bricks and the building in the city campus is made of red bricks. The gray building is the place of teaching, studying and living. I seldom have the chance to walk out of this gray building, to go to the real countryside. My Mom does not lead me there. In the countryside campus in 1975, in the morning my Mom sends me to the kindergarten. That is a room about 300 square feet, no toys, only a few desks and stools. Five or six children include me are there. Many times, there is no teacher there. Other children put down the stools on the ground, pushing it along and bumping into each other. I’m afraid of such game, such violence. I’m not good at it. I participate in it one or two times. It’s good that I haven’t got hurt. My body is fragile. Anyway I have played such game. Perhaps the teacher wants us to play it. After that, I stand at a corner of the room, watching others play. The pushing of the stools and the bumping of the stools produce so much dust and noise, making me feel even the breath is poignant. Many a morning is gone like this. The rest see the replies.  (Jun 9, 2013 | post #1)

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Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.6: The Sky Outside the 4th Fl...

Continue with the preceding text. Wei Liu 3. Right of decision. The law and policy should be decided of whether to enact or not by people’s universal vote, including the tax rate, government budget, how many armed forces a country should have, how many classes a student should have a day. We shouldn’t talk about socialist, capitalist, or left or right any more. Mankind should have only one doctrine that is people’s universal vote decide a country’s law and policy. 4. Right of cash. The money belonging to all the people should be distributed evenly among all the people, f. g. one year China gets a donation of $260 billion for Chinese people, then every one of the 1.3 billion Chinese people should get the cash of 260/1.3=$200 through the people-elected government that year. Those who oppose our ideas are never willing to let people vote on their ideas or our ideas. And we are always willing to let people do such universal vote. Then every one should see who are lying and who are sincerely serving the people. For those who largely agree to our ideas of the 4 fundamental human rights, we call each other human rights workers, comrade, awakened people, democratic people or common people. Just like playing chess, reading a book, no need to register. The 4 fundamental human rights should apply to any nation in the world. We wish those who largely agree to the 4 fundamental human rights can tell 5 or more people about it and let those agree do the same thing. When a country has serious problem, it is always the problem of human rights, democracy. Wish people in the world not to live in vain in such an era filled up with our tears. Let’s participate in the grand project of making a new country, a new world in which every one has the 4 fundamental human rights. Let’s spread the truth, expand the strength of democracy, to save ourselves, our friends and our nation. The end More articles of mine both Chinese and English are in my blog http://blog.boxun. com/hero/flake/ Public Worker, Comrade, Awakened People, Democratic People, Common People Wei Liu 2013 Mail: (Please keep your letter within 4 pages and no parcel.) Wei Liu P. O. Box 1967 Bemidji, MN 56619 U. S. A. Email: daysinchina@hotmai l.com  (Jun 9, 2013 | post #3)

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Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.6: The Sky Outside the 4th Fl...

Continue with the preceding text. Wei Liu I don’t know why that kindergarten does not open in the afternoon. Thank God. I can stay at home in the afternoon. The home for my Mom and me is at the end of the fourth floor. My Mom has left the home or room. I don’t know where she went. She should be around. I would like to know where she is so that I can search her out. I don’t know how far I can walk. I guess I can walk from this end of the floor to the other hand, which is about 50 meters. But there is no such possibility. My Mom has locked me up in the room. She has warned me many times before her leaving, “Wei, don’t climb on the window. If you do, you may fall over and die.” “OK, I know, Mom,” I respond. Now she’s not here. I walk to the window and open it. The window sill is as high as my chin. I cannot see what’s below it, but only see the white sky outside. Now I’m 1 meter tall. I get a small stool 10 centimeter high and put it by the window. Then my feet step on it. I move my heard outside the window. Now I can see. The sunshine fills up the surroundings, so quiet. There are 3 windows below my window, with big black electric wire running through one of the 3 windows. Then my home should be on the 4th floor. And what before us is a tract of yellow soil and a couple of rooms made of soil and tile. That is a factory to make clay. There are no woods or grass. The air may be fresher than that of the city, but it is not obvious. There isn’t anything that is very good. I step down from the small stool and go to the desk, sit down. I take out a pencil and a piece of white paper and begin to draw. First, I draw a horizontal straight line and then a vertical straight line to divide the paper into 4 parts. Then I can draw 4 pictures on one piece of paper instead of just 1. It’s not easy to get the paper from my Mom, who often says, “Wei, how can I get you so many papers a day?” The end of “My Life in China 1.6: The Sky Outside the 4th Floor Looks White” My Life in China: Book 1 From Birth to the Graduation of Elementary School to be continued ****************** ****************** *************** Many years later, I, Wei Liu, as a common person, feel the need to speak up a real solution to the world. Build Up a Fair, Democratic New World Wei Liu June 9, 2013 In China, where there are no human rights, people are thrown by the high Communist officials into the battlefields one after another. From the 1970s to the 2010s, in the battlefield of the Entrance Examination to College, we Chinese students study 13 hours a day to survive that exam and shed many tears, with faint hope to make a living. Less than 2% of people can make a living on his own. When can 1.3 billion Chinese people to have our own house, our own medical care? When can we Chinese people free from the 100 degrees heat waves and the pollution? When can we have enough time for chess, mahjong, classics books and other good things that give happiness to ourselves and other people? In the 2010s, living in China one day is equal to have a pack of cigarette. Also, please be aware that English is a mandatory course in high school in China, and some Chinese Communist posts English words/replies against democracy and human rights workers like me, and they pretend to be westerners. The solution for people in any country to depart misery and enjoy happiness is to realize a fair and democratic new country, where every one has the 4 fundamental human rights: 1. Right of land. Every one is entitled to have about half an acre of land given by God for him/her to live. 2. Right of welfare. Having occupied/utilized the resources including the land of people, the government has the obligation to give every one the welfares of housing, food, education and medical care. The rest see the reply.  (Jun 9, 2013 | post #2)

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Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.6: The Sky Outside the 4th Fl...

Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.6: The Sky Outside the 4th Floor Looks White Wei Liu June 2013 I become 5 in 1975 in Chongqing, China. “Wei, Mom is going to the countryside campus. Do you like to go with me?” Mom asks me. “Mom, I’m willing to go with you,” I say. Of course, I’m willing to be with my Mom. This is my Mom’s high school to enact the policy of Mao Zedong that the students go to the country to learn from the peasants, and the same is with the teachers like my Mom. No. 52 High School of Chongqing, China, where my Mom works, has established a countryside campus. I feel quite excited. I’m leaving the current living place for a while. I don’t know for how long. Even my Mom does not know. I have never been to the countryside. I only hear the acquaintances of my Mom and Dad, coming from the countryside, say to them when leaving, “Someday when you have time, you can come and visit us in the countryside. The air in the countryside is fresh.” I have no idea of fresh air. Maybe it is a good thing. I like imagining. Let me imagine what goodness may be in the countryside campus. Are there many trees? Maybe. Is there the grassland I see in the movie? Maybe. Are there hills? Maybe. Are there bad things? I don’t know. Maybe. When my Mom talks about it to me, there is no smile on her face. She likes smiling. I don’t see why she does so. In my daily life, I never see many pleasant things. On the contrary, I often want to cry, but dare not. I know my Dad and Mom dislike it. I’ve never seen my Mom cry. Before long, I see the real face of the countryside campus. The place My Mom and I arrive is called Sanxikou, meaning 3-Creek Pass, located on the west bank of Jialing River, about 22 miles north to Lianglukou, Urban District, Chongqing, where my home and my Dad’s hospital is, and it’s about 9 miles south to Beipei District. To me, the distance is truly far. I have no idea of how to return home. The countryside campus is a product of Mao Zedong’s policy that the students go to the countryside to learn from the peasant. The building here is also made of bricks, with students and teachers going in and out. The only difference between here and the city campus is that here the building is made of gray bricks and the building in the city campus is made of red bricks. The gray building is the place of teaching, studying and living. I seldom have the chance to walk out of this gray building, to go to the real countryside. My Mom does not lead me there. In the countryside campus in 1975, in the morning my Mom sends me to the kindergarten. That is a room about 300 square feet, no toys, only a few desks and stools. Five or six children include me are there. Many times, there is no teacher there. Other children put down the stools on the ground, pushing it along and bumping into each other. I’m afraid of such game, such violence. I’m not good at it. I participate in it one or two times. It’s good that I haven’t got hurt. My body is fragile. Anyway I have played such game. Perhaps the teacher wants us to play it. After that, I stand at a corner of the room, watching others play. The pushing of the stools and the bumping of the stools produce so much dust and noise, making me feel even the breath is poignant. Many a morning is gone like this. The rest see the replies. More articles of mine both Chinese and English are in my blog http://blog.boxun. com/hero/flake/ Public Worker, Comrade, Awakened People, Democratic People, Common People Wei Liu 2013 Mail: (Please keep your letter within 4 pages and no parcel.) Wei Liu P. O. Box 1967 Bemidji, MN 56619 U. S. A. Email: daysinchina@hotmai l.com  (Jun 9, 2013 | post #1)

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Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.5: China Needs Democracy

Continue with the preceding text. Wei Liu 4. Right of cash. The money belonging to all the people should be distributed evenly among all the people, f. g. one year China gets a donation of $260 billion for Chinese people, then every one of the 1.3 billion Chinese people should get 260/1.3=$200 through the people-elected government that year. Those who oppose our ideas are never willing to let people vote on their ideas or our ideas. And we are always willing to let people do such universal vote. Then every one should see who are lying and who are sincerely serving the people. Those who largely agree to our ideas of the 4 fundamental human rights, we call each other public worker, comrade, awakened people, democratic people or common people. Just like playing chess, reading a book, no need to register. The 4 fundamental human rights should apply to any nation in the world. We wish those who largely agree to the 4 fundamental human rights can tell 5 or more people about it and let those agree do the same thing. Wish people in the world not to live in vain in such an era filled up with our tears. Let’s participate in the grand project of making a new country, a new world in which every one has the 4 fundamental human rights. Let’s spread the truth, expand the strength of democracy, to save ourselves, our friends and our nation. The end More articles of mine both Chinese and English are in my blog http://blog.boxun. com/hero/flake/ Public Worker, Comrade, Awakened People, Democratic People, Common People Wei Liu 2013 Mail: (Please keep your letter within 4 pages and no parcel.) Wei Liu P. O. Box 1967 Bemidji, MN 56619 U. S. A. Email: daysinchina@hotmai l.com  (May 31, 2013 | post #3)

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Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.5: China Needs Democracy

Continue with the preceding text. Wei Liu At my aunt’s place, the adults have alcohol. My Mom does not drink. Children like me cannot drink at all, and only eat the dishes. On the square table sitting 8 people, there are many dishes including Sausage and Cauliflower Stir-Fried, Carp in Red Sauce, Boiled Chicken in Soy Sauce, Steamed Fat Pork, Spinach Soup. Underneath the Steamed Fat Pork is the glutinous rice, delicious. I’m happy to have the tasty dishes. It is rare to see people tied in ropes moving on the truck, but nobody talks about it during the big meal. Nobody says that it is good to strike those so-called class enemy. My Dad, Mom, aunt, cousin are talking about various topics under the sun. I cannot talk about anything, but concentrating on eating the dishes that are not available in my daily life. My family has good dishes only during the Spring Festival and I reckon my aunt’s family to be about the same. My family stays at aunt’s place for supper and goes home around 10:00 pm at night. We take the No. 5 Bus and return to our home in Lianglukou, about 3 miles to the west. I feel China need democracy, which can let different people to present their different opinions and finally a universal vote by all the people to decide the law and policy of our country. The end of My Life in China 1.5: The National Party Are Movie Heroes in the Real Life, China Needs Democracy” “My life in China: From Birth to the Graduation of Elementary School” to be continued ****************** ****************** *************** Many years later, I, Wei Liu, as a common person, feel the need to speak up a solution to the world. Build Up a Fair, Democratic New World Wei Liu May 31, 2013 In China, where there are no human rights, people are thrown by the high Communist officials into the battlefields one after another. From the 1970s to the 2010s, in the battlefield of the Entrance Examination to College, we Chinese students study 13 hours a day to survive that exam and shed many tears, with faint hope to make a living. Less than 2% of people can make a living on his own. When can 1.3 billion Chinese people to have our own house, our own medical care? When can we Chinese people free from the 100 degrees heat waves and the pollution? When can we have enough time for chess, mahjong, classics books and other good things that give happiness to ourselves and other people? In the 2010s, living in China one day is equal to have a pack of cigarette. Also, please be aware that English is a mandatory course in high school in China, and some Chinese Communist posts English words/replies against democracy and human rights workers like me, and they pretend to be westerners. The solution for 1.3 billion Chinese people to depart misery and enjoy happiness is to realize a fair and democratic new China, where every Chinese has the 4 fundamental human rights: 1. Right of land. Every one is entitled to have about half an acre of land given by God for him/her to live. 2. Right of welfare. Having occupied/utilized the resources including the land of people, the government has the obligation to give every one the welfares of housing, food, education and medical care. 3. Right of decision. The law and policy should be decided of whether to enact or not by people’s universal vote, including the tax rate, government budget, how many armed forces our country should have, how many classes a student should have a day. We shouldn’t talk about socialist, capitalist, or left or right any more. Mankind should have only one doctrine that is people’s universal vote decide a country’s law and policy. The rest see the reply.  (May 31, 2013 | post #2)

US News

Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.5: China Needs Democracy

Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.5: The National Party Are Movie Heroes in the Real Life, China Needs Democracy Wei Liu May 2013 In the Spring Festival of 1974 when I’m 4, our family goes to the Libration Monument, an area in downtown Chongqing, China, to visit my aunt, who lives about 3 miles to the east. There are different routes to get there, which is about 2 miles away for the direct distance. Chongqing is a mountain city, and the actual distance is more than that. This time we take the bus going through the lower area of the city, from Caiyuanba to Nanji Gate and then to Wanglong Gate. Shortly after Nanji Gate, a Liberation 4-wheel truck is coming to us. 4 men in light color clothes stand on the truck, with ropes tightly running through their shoulders, to their back. A big black cross like X is hung on their chest. Behind them are several men in helmet, green military uniform, military belt. They are the soldiers or policemen, looking ferocious. Instantly, I know this is that the so-called proprietary regime has caught the so-called class enemy. Unlike the Communist media saying that the class enemy always shivers, the 4 men with ropes on them stand there motionless, looking straight with the sparkling eye, showing no joy, almost no sadness, mostly grudge. “These are being sent to the execution field to be shot,” my cousin standing beside me says. “What crime did they commit?” I ask. “Not sure, anyway they are labeled as the anti-revolutionary ,” she answers. Two trucks like this pass by and more trucks with people tied in ropes are coming. Several more trucks have passed. Then people stand in the truck are no longer men, but women. They are in light color clothes, with ropes tightly running through their shoulders, to their back. A big black cross like X is hung on their chest. Behind them are several men in helmet, green military uniform, military belt. They are the soldiers or policemen, looking ferocious. The women with ropes on them show no sign of quiver, looking to have more composure and more grudge. Several old women have grayish white hair, which dances around their faces as the truck moving fast in the wintry wind. They are not disturbed a little by that, but in full composure, looking forward with grudge. The 4-year-old I dare not say anything, but admire it so much in my heart. Among these caught people, aren’t the females Lady Jiang, a big hero in Communist movie, and aren’t the males Mr. Yunfeng Xu, another big hero in Communist movie? The Communist heroes are in the movie only and the heroes of the National Party, the enemy of the Communist Party, and the so-called Anti-Revolutionary are in our real life. I feel it is just hard to decide whether the Communist Party, the National Party, or the so-called class enemy is revolutionary or anti-revolutionary . It needs more time to find out the answer. More articles of mine both Chinese and English are in my blog http://blog.boxun. com/hero/flake/ Public Worker, Comrade, Awakened People, Democratic People, Common People Wei Liu 2013 Mail: (Please keep your letter within 4 pages and no parcel.) Wei Liu P. O. Box 1967 Bemidji, MN 56619 U. S. A. Email: daysinchina@hotmai l.com The rest see the replies.  (May 31, 2013 | post #1)

US Politics

Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.5: China Needs Democracy

Continue with the preceding text. Wei Liu Those who oppose our ideas are never willing to let people vote on their ideas or our ideas. And we are always willing to let people do such universal vote. Then every one should see who are lying and who are sincerely serving the people. Those who largely agree to our ideas of the 4 fundamental human rights, we call each other public worker, comrade, awakened people, democratic people or common people. Just like playing chess, reading a book, no need to register. The 4 fundamental human rights should apply to any nation in the world. We wish those who largely agree to the 4 fundamental human rights can tell 5 or more people about it and let those agree do the same thing. Wish people in the world not to live in vain in such an era filled up with our tears. Let’s participate in the grand project of making a new country, a new world in which every one has the 4 fundamental human rights. Let’s spread the truth, expand the strength of democracy, to save ourselves, our friends and our nation. The end More articles of mine both Chinese and English are in my blog http://blog.boxun. com/hero/flake/ Public Worker, Comrade, Awakened People, Democratic People, Common People Wei Liu 2013 Mail: (Please keep your letter within 4 pages and no parcel.) Wei Liu P. O. Box 1967 Bemidji, MN 56619 U. S. A. Email: daysinchina@hotmai l.com The end  (May 31, 2013 | post #3)

US Politics

Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.5: China Needs Democracy

I cannot talk about anything, but concentrating on eating the dishes that are not available in my daily life. My family has good dishes only during the Spring Festival and I reckon my aunt’s family to be about the same. My family stays at aunt’s place for supper and goes home around 10:00 pm at night. We take the No. 5 Bus and return to our home in Lianglukou, about 3 miles to the west. I feel China need democracy, which can let different people to present their different opinions and finally a universal vote by all the people to decide the law and policy of our country. The end of My Life in China 1.5: The National Party Are Movie Heroes in the Real Life, China Needs Democracy” “My life in China: From Birth to the Graduation of Elementary School” to be continued ****************** ****************** *************** Many years later, I, Wei Liu, as a common person, feel the need to speak up a solution to the world. Build Up a Fair, Democratic New World Wei Liu May 31, 2013 In China, where there are no human rights, people are thrown by the high Communist officials into the battlefields one after another. From the 1970s to the 2010s, in the battlefield of the Entrance Examination to College, we Chinese students study 13 hours a day to survive that exam and shed many tears, with faint hope to make a living. Less than 2% of people can make a living on his own. When can 1.3 billion Chinese people to have our own house, our own medical care? When can we Chinese people free from the 100 degrees heat waves and the pollution? When can we have enough time for chess, mahjong, classics books and other good things that give happiness to ourselves and other people? In the 2010s, living in China one day is equal to have a pack of cigarette. Also, please be aware that English is a mandatory course in high school in China, and some Chinese Communist posts English words/replies against democracy and human rights workers like me, and they pretend to be westerners. The solution for 1.3 billion Chinese people to depart misery and enjoy happiness is to realize a fair and democratic new China, where every Chinese has the 4 fundamental human rights: 1. Right of land. Every one is entitled to have about half an acre of land given by God for him/her to live. 2. Right of welfare. Having occupied/utilized the resources including the land of people, the government has the obligation to give every one the welfares of housing, food, education and medical care. 3. Right of decision. The law and policy should be decided of whether to enact or not by people’s universal vote, including the tax rate, government budget, how many armed forces our country should have, how many classes a student should have a day. We shouldn’t talk about socialist, capitalist, or left or right any more. Mankind should have only one doctrine that is people’s universal vote decide a country’s law and policy. 4. Right of cash. The money belonging to all the people should be distributed evenly among all the people, f. g. one year China gets a donation of $260 billion for Chinese people, then every one of the 1.3 billion Chinese people should get 260/1.3=$200 through the people-elected government that year. More articles of mine both Chinese and English are in my blog http://blog.boxun. com/hero/flake/ Public Worker, Comrade, Awakened People, Democratic People, Common People Wei Liu 2013 Mail: (Please keep your letter within 4 pages and no parcel.) Wei Liu P. O. Box 1967 Bemidji, MN 56619 U. S. A. Email: daysinchina@hotmai l.com The rest see the reply.  (May 31, 2013 | post #2)

US Politics

Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.5: China Needs Democracy

Wei Liu: My Life in China 1.5: The National Party Are Movie Heroes in the Real Life, China Needs Democracy Wei Liu May 2013 In the Spring Festival of 1974 when I’m 4, our family goes to the Libration Monument, an area in downtown Chongqing, China, to visit my aunt, who lives about 3 miles to the east. There are different routes to get there, which is about 2 miles away for the direct distance. Chongqing is a mountain city, and the actual distance is more than that. This time we take the bus going through the lower area of the city, from Caiyuanba to Nanji Gate and then to Wanglong Gate. Shortly after Nanji Gate, a Liberation 4-wheel truck is coming to us. 4 men in light color clothes stand on the truck, with ropes tightly running through their shoulders, to their back. A big black cross like X is hung on their chest. Behind them are several men in helmet, green military uniform, military belt. They are the soldiers or policemen, looking ferocious. Instantly, I know this is that the so-called proprietary regime has caught the so-called class enemy. Unlike the Communist media saying that the class enemy always shivers, the 4 men with ropes on them stand there motionless, looking straight with the sparkling eye, showing no joy, almost no sadness, mostly grudge. “These are being sent to the execution field to be shot,” my cousin standing beside me says. “What crime did they commit?” I ask. “Not sure, anyway they are labeled as the anti-revolutionary ,” she answers. Two trucks like this pass by and more trucks with people tied in ropes are coming. Several more trucks have passed. Then people stand in the truck are no longer men, but women. They are in light color clothes, with ropes tightly running through their shoulders, to their back. A big black cross like X is hung on their chest. Behind them are several men in helmet, green military uniform, military belt. They are the soldiers or policemen, looking ferocious. The women with ropes on them show no sign of quiver, looking to have more composure and more grudge. Several old women have grayish white hair, which dances around their faces as the truck moving fast in the wintry wind. They are not disturbed a little by that, but in full composure, looking forward with grudge. The 4-year-old I dare not say anything, but admire it so much in my heart. Among these caught people, aren’t the females Lady Jiang, a big hero in Communist movie, and aren’t the males Mr. Yunfeng Xu, another big hero in Communist movie? The Communist heroes are in the movie only and the heroes of the National Party, the enemy of the Communist Party, and the so-called Anti-Revolutionary are in our real life. I feel it is just hard to decide whether the Communist Party, the National Party, or the so-called class enemy is revolutionary or anti-revolutionary . It needs more time to find out the answer. At my aunt’s place, the adults have alcohol. My Mom does not drink. Children like me cannot drink at all, and only eat the dishes. On the square table sitting 8 people, there are many dishes including Sausage and Cauliflower Stir-Fried, Carp in Red Sauce, Boiled Chicken in Soy Sauce, Steamed Fat Pork, Spinach Soup. Underneath the Steamed Fat Pork is the glutinous rice, delicious. I’m happy to have the tasty dishes. It is rare to see people tied in ropes moving on the truck, but nobody talks about it during the big meal. Nobody says that it is good to strike those so-called class enemy. My Dad, Mom, aunt, cousin are talking about various topics under the sun. I cannot talk about anything, but concentrating on eating the dishes that are not available in my daily life. My family has good dishes only during the Spring Festival and I reckon my aunt’s family to be about the same. The rest see the reply.  (May 31, 2013 | post #1)