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Australia

Family Law=dump child to grands

it order to save taxpayer $ from foster care and child care, anyone but the mothers, highly discrimination act fr oz government  (Jan 23, 2013 | post #3)

Australia

Family Law=dump child to grands

Family Law in oz=dump child to grandsparents and disregard mothers care and love, motto from the department of corruption services, DOCS.  (Jan 23, 2013 | post #1)

New South Wales, Australia

aboriginals descent, they own this land not the white

For those people, who like to say go back where u come from, say it only if u re from aboriginals descent, they own this land....  (Jan 20, 2013 | post #1)

Top Stories

aboriginals descent, they own this land, not whites

For those people, who like to say go back where u come from, say it only if u re from aboriginals descent, they own this land.  (Jan 20, 2013 | post #1)

Australia

REemoval of child fr mum with dissability DOCS inhumane act

http://www.illawar ramercury.com.au/s tory/1190940/those -with-disabilities -can-be-able-paren ts-too/?cs=27 The recent removal of a child from a young mother with a disability is heart-wrenching and disturbing, and leaves me and those involved in the case in emotional turmoil. Goodness knows, then, how the poor mother, "Rebecca ", is coping, let alone her child. Of course, there are legitimate situations in which a parent's disability may result in the loss of their parenting rights. Such situations could include where the parent has a serious mental illness that cannot be stabilised, or where a parent may have a serious substance abuse disorder that results in abuse and neglect. However, I am increasingly concerned that children are being removed from parents with a disability based solely on that disability, and not because the cases meet the relevant tests. There is no readily available data to say how many Australians with a disability have had their child removed, but parents with a disability are up to 10 times more likely to have a child removed from their care under the child protection regime. Very often their child is removed not because the parent has harmed or neglected them, but because the child is seen as being at risk of neglect. The appropriate response to this is to provide support, encouragement, help and education. to raise their children, and believes they should be encouraged and helped to do so. This stance is echoed by the Department of Human Services. It has developed "operating framework" principles, including that parents with a disability are parents first and foremost. Children have a right to be raised by their natural parents, whether or not they have a disability. This right is enshrined by two United Nations conventions to which the Australian Government is a signatory: the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Families are also protected under the Victorian Charter of Human Rights 2006. There is substantial evidence that parents with cognitive disabilities (of which those with an intellectual disability make up 1 per cent of the parenting population) can successfully parent their children. The law may be causing discrimination against parents with a disability if it does not consider the UN conventions. The family law case of "Rebecca " did not consider the UN conventions and, in a recent child protection matter, authorities failed to understand the impact of the mother's ability to communicate with them; they needed to find ways to help her do that. My office would like to see the following reforms: •courts engaging disability experts to assess parenting capacity •empathy for parents with a disability with a presumption that, unless evidence suggests otherwise, they parent with good intentions •parents with a disability being supported by specialists when dealing with relevant courts •where children are removed, that parents with a disability have sufficient access to enable a flourishing relationship •a child be removed at birth only in extraordinary circumstances and, if so, then counselling and support be provided and contact with the parent be made as soon as practicable. See your ad here Australia has a sad record of forcible removal of children from their parents based on the personal characteristics of the parents, such as an indigenous background or marital status. Removing a child from a parent because they have a disability is discriminatory, inhumane and breaches the human rights of both the parent and the child. Laws, policies and practices must be reformed to remove this possibility. If they say it takes a village to raise a child, then where is a village for a parent with a disability? We must start building it now. Colleen Pearce is Victoria's Public Advocate.  (Dec 17, 2012 | post #1)

Australia

child taken, a mother grieves by DOCS inhuame act

http://www.essenti albaby.com.au/life -style/nutrition-a nd-wellbeing/a-chi ld-taken-a-mother- grieves-20121217-2 bijx.html It is more than three months since Rebecca's child was taken from her, but the pain is still raw and the decision still impossible for the grieving young mother to fully comprehend. At times during the court hearing she would say, 'I just can't do this. It is too difficult'. But she did because she loved and wanted to keep her child She had fought hard during the court hearing to keep the little girl who had been the centre of her world for eight years. She had stayed strong through the long days in front of the magistrate and the lawyers, and had kept her composure over more than three hours of testing cross-examination. But the decision, when it came, cut like a knife. At first, she was speechless with shock. The moment she stepped from the courtroom she collapsed in grief. Advertisement "I tried to comfort her like any other decent human being would but she was totally stricken," says a veteran litigation guardian, who had been at Rebecca's side throughout the case. "I told her she was a wonderful person and that she was a good mother but I just felt powerless to help her." Rebecca did not lose her child because she was an incompetent or abusive mother. Indeed, the reports from the paediatrician, the psychologist and the family support worker presented in court all acknowledged her love, dedication and capability. Now Rebecca has access to her daughter only on alternate weekends and for part of school holidays - a decision which she cannot appeal and about which she must remain publicly silent.Because of the rules around media reporting of family law matters, we cannot tell you Rebecca's real name, or that of her daughter. And she is prohibited from speaking to the media about the case and the turmoil she is going through. After she made a number of anguished and angry phone calls and sent text messages immediately after her daughter was removed, Rebecca was called back to court. There, she was subjected to a further order forbidding her from talking about the case to anyone other than social workers, lawyers and counsellors. "It wasn't just her child they took away, it was also her voice," says her litigation guardian, who also cannot be named. "She was distressed. There was a bit of language but it wasn't threatening." The case has deeply concerned lawyers and human rights workers, who believe Rebecca is the victim of an inflexible Australian Family Law Act that discriminates against disabled parents in breach of United Nations conventions protecting the rights of the disabled and children. For some, there are disturbing parallels with the "stolen generations" - the Aboriginal children forcibly removed by the state because their parents were deemed incapable of properly caring for them. Victoria's Public Advocate, Colleen Pearce, has written to the Human Rights Commission and the federal Attorney-General raising alarm at the separation a child and her natural mother when no evidence was produced that the child was at risk of harm or neglect. She told Disability Discrimination Commissioner Graham Innes of her "serious concerns that the processes and outcome of the case breach the human rights of this young woman and her child". She described Rebecca as an "average young mother", a sociable person ". But she did because she loved and wanted to keep her child. That's what has made this all the more devastating. She hung in there, but she lost her child anyway."  (Dec 16, 2012 | post #1)

Australia

removal of child/baby from mum with disability,DOCS inhum...

http://www.illawar ramercury.com.au/ The recent removal of a child from a young mother with a disability is heart-wrenching and disturbing, and leaves me and those involved in the case in emotional turmoil. Goodness knows, then, how the poor mother, "Rebecca ", is coping, let alone her child. Of course, there are legitimate situations in which a parent's disability may result in the loss of their parenting rights. Such situations could include where the parent has a serious mental illness that cannot be stabilised, or where a parent may have a serious substance abuse disorder that results in abuse and neglect. However, I am increasingly concerned that children are being removed from parents with a disability based solely on that disability, and not because the cases meet the relevant tests. There is no readily available data to say how many Australians with a disability have had their child removed, but parents with a disability are up to 10 times more likely to have a child removed from their care under the child protection regime. Very often their child is removed not because the parent has harmed or neglected them, but because the child is seen as being at risk of neglect. The appropriate response to this is to provide support, encouragement, help and education. to raise their children, and believes they should be encouraged and helped to do so. This stance is echoed by the Department of Human Services. It has developed "operating framework" principles, including that parents with a disability are parents first and foremost. Children have a right to be raised by their natural parents, whether or not they have a disability. This right is enshrined by two United Nations conventions to which the Australian Government is a signatory: the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Families are also protected under the Victorian Charter of Human Rights 2006. There is substantial evidence that parents with cognitive disabilities (of which those with an intellectual disability make up 1 per cent of the parenting population) can successfully parent their children. The law may be causing discrimination against parents with a disability if it does not consider the UN conventions. The family law case of "Rebecca " did not consider the UN conventions and, in a recent child protection matter, authorities failed to understand the impact of the mother's ability to communicate with them; they needed to find ways to help her do that. My office would like to see the following reforms: •courts engaging disability experts to assess parenting capacity •empathy for parents with a disability with a presumption that, unless evidence suggests otherwise, they parent with good intentions •parents with a disability being supported by specialists when dealing with relevant courts •where children are removed, that parents with a disability have sufficient access to enable a flourishing relationship •a child be removed at birth only in extraordinary circumstances and, if so, then counselling and support be provided and contact with the parent be made as soon as practicable. See your ad here Australia has a sad record of forcible removal of children from their parents based on the personal characteristics of the parents, such as an indigenous background or marital status. Removing a child from a parent because they have a disability is discriminatory, inhumane and breaches the human rights of both the parent and the child. Laws, policies and practices must be reformed to remove this possibility. If they say it takes a village to raise a child, then where is a village for a parent with a disability? We must start building it now. Colleen Pearce is Victoria's Public Advocate.  (Dec 16, 2012 | post #1)

Australia

which parents NOT with yr child on Xmas? Due to DOCS?!!

which parents NOT with yr child on Xmas? Due to DOCS?!! Ucant even celebrate with yr child on Christmas cos the Department of Community Service remove yr child from yr care and DUMPED in to foster carers and grandparents?!!  (Dec 13, 2012 | post #1)

Q & A with victimmum

Hometown:

wollongong

I Believe In:

anti DOCS department of community service