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Apr 28, 2011

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IT Services

U.S. Trade Deficit With China Grows

I’m a proponent of a proposal to reduce USA’s trade deficit of goods that was first introduced to the Senate in 2006. The market driven proposal does not favor or discriminate between foreign nations, or between manufactured, agricultural or any other industries’ products. It is self funding; eventually all expenses are borne by U.S. purchasers of foreign goods. Google: wikipedia import certificates, trade deficit Respectfully, Supposn  (Oct 10, 2012 | post #16)

US Politics

Reduce the trade deficit; increase GDP & median wage

Reduce the trade deficit; increase GDP & median wage Warren Buffett’s concept to significantly reduce USA’s trade deficit. It is not our global trade but our trade deficits’ that are a significant net detriment to our economy. Trade deficits’ are ALWAYS detrimental to their nations’ GDPs. I’m a proponent of a proposal to reduce USA’s trade deficit of goods that was first introduced to the Senate in 2006. The market driven proposal does not favor or discriminate between foreign nations, or between manufactured, agricultural or any other industries’ products. It is self funding; eventually all expenses are borne by U.S. purchasers of foreign goods. The basic concept is for exporters who choose to pay the federal fees to acquire TRANSFERABLE IMPORT CERTIFICATES, (ICs) for the assessed value of their goods leaving the USA. The fees defray all direct federal expenses due to this proposed policy. Importers would be required to surrender ICs for the assessed value of their goods entering the USA. Surrendered certificates are cancelled. These transferable Import Certificates may seem as a boon to exporters of USA goods but it’s actually an indirect and effective export subsidy. The version of this policy I advocate is completely market driven, funded by U.S. purchasers of foreign good and excludes values of specifically listed scarce or precious minerals integral to goods being assessed. This trade policy would significantly decrease USA’s trade deficit of goods and increase the aggregate sum of USA’s imports plus exports and our GDP more than otherwise. The GDP bolsters the median wage. Wage earning families benefit from cheaper imported goods but every day of every year they’re dependent upon their U.S. wages. Regardless of how small the additions to imports’ prices due to Import Certificates, (unlike tariffs) USA’s assessed imports could never exceed that of our exports. USA consumers will be able to purchase cheap, (but not the absolute cheapest) imported goods. We cannot afford the absolute cheapest. Refer to: www.USA-Trade-Defi cit.Blogspot.com or Google: “wikipedia, import certificates “. Respectfully, Supposn  (Oct 3, 2012 | post #1)

Democrat

I no longer vote for Democrats!

For over a half century I voted for Democrats within every general election and failed to vote in very few Democratic Primary elections. I voted for and had high expectations from Obama. After almost two years of Obama’s failing to hold to his own stated positions, In 2010 I lost all hope. Obama silently witnessed Democrats’ declining to debate income taxes on the floors of the U.S. Congress before the 2010 elections. Last year I cast my vote for the Green Party’s congressional candidate. I’m generally in agreement with almost everything Obama first proposes but he consistently fails to retain his own positions. The Republican Party is able to depend upon Obama retreating to what he believes to be an expedient position. He generally flees to a less advantageous and never to strategically improved positions. Cheap card tables are less consistent than Obama; they sometimes remain erect when they’re nudged. I did not vote for Democrats in 2010; I will not vote for Democrats in 2011; it’s not likely that I’ll vote for Democrats in 2012. The Democratic Party may never again justify my voting for them within my remaining years. Respectfully, Supposn  (Jul 10, 2011 | post #1)

US Politics

Trade deficits are always detrimental to their nations’ G...

Trade deficits are always detrimental to their nations’ GDPs. Trade surpluses’ contributions or trade deficits’ detriments to their Nation’s GDPs are always understated. Non-exported products that enabled production of export products but weren’t reflected within prices of any exported products cannot be identified. For example prices of goods often do not FULLY reflect the portions of infrastructure, research and development expenditures that supported the production of those goods. Such support provided by government agencies or other non-profit entities in particular are generally not fully reflected within the prices of the goods. The extent that production of exported products also enabled or induced additional production of products not exported cannot be identified. For example increased production of exported products may increase production of local beauty parlor service products. Due to all such unidentified and unknown productions due to export production, trade surpluses understate global trades’ contributions to nations’ GDPs. USA’s trade deficit denied our nation the production of the products we imported. That’s why trade deficits are negative terms within GDP calculations. To the extent that production of goods and service products were not reflected within the prices of USA’s imports, we were additionally denied the infrastructures, the knowledge and experience gained due to the production of USA’s imports. The direct and indirect benefits due to the production of USA imports and all of the jobs associated to these productions fully contributed to the nations that produced USA’s imported products. USA’s trade deficits understate out trade deficits detriments to our GDP. Refer to: www.USA-Trade-Defi cit.Blogspot.com Or http://en.wikipedi a.org/wiki/Import_ Certificates or http://en.wikipedi a.org/wiki/Gross_d omestic_product or Google: wikipedia, import certificates or Google: wikipedia, gdp Respectfully, Supposn  (Apr 28, 2011 | post #1)