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Halitosis

How I got to the root of my halitosis problem

Hi Tami, Try calling TheraBreath (800) 97-FRESH or going to www.therabreath.co m, they should be able to get you a free sample :) good luck  (Oct 24, 2011 | post #57)

Halitosis

Is It Bad Breath Or Not?

Hi Michelle, TheraBreath products were actually made by a dentist. It's over the counter so you shouldn't have to consult a doctor or dentist to use them. Good luck  (Jun 20, 2011 | post #3)

Halitosis

Is It Bad Breath Or Not?

I agree, I mean you can’t expect cats and dogs to have minty fresh breath, but really breath shouldn’t just be ignored. Have you had your cats checked out at the vet? They may have your cat have a thorough dental cleaning which requires anesthesia. The cat could have periodontal disease, it’s the number one disease in dogs and cats. The thorough cleaning at the vet’s would be a good start. I know some groomers also do non-anesthetic dental cleanings, but they aren’t as thorough. The vet will probably suggest toothpaste and regular manual brushings after the initial cleaning. You can also try an oral solution and put it directly on your pet’s gums. If your cat is too squeamish, there is an oral solution to help breath that you put in his or her water. You can read more about it here: http://www.therabr eath.com/art_dogs. asp. I started using it on my dog a few months ago, I just put two capfuls a day in his water and it has worked so well! People have even commented that his breath is much better. I hope this helps!  (Jun 6, 2011 | post #1)

Halitosis

My halitosis is gone. I can tell you what I did. Serious ...

Drinking water will definitely help with bad breath, as this relieves dry mouth with inhibits the bacteria that cause bad breath from producing sulfur, which causes that bad smell. Be sure to have her drink 6-8 glasses of water a day. However, this is only a temporary fix. As one of the main causes of bad breath is dry mouth, eating fruits and vegetables can help get rid of bad breath. Green garnishes like parsley, basil, and rosemary are good. Chewing on parsley sprigs releases breath freshening oils. Also, crisp foods like apples, firm pears, carrots, jicama help with the production of saliva, which helps keep oxygen in your mouth. If there is less oxygen available in your mouth, then you have an ‘anaerobic’ environment, which literally means ‘without oxygen.’ An anaerobic environment is where all those odorous sulfur-producing bacteria reside. Flossing is also a very important part of good oral hygiene. Food constantly gets stuck in between your teeth, so if you don't floss, that food attracts bacteria causing a bad odor in your mouth. Flossing can also help prevent tartar buildup and tooth decay, so it’s a good thing she’s flossing regularly. To combat bad breath, you should continue to practice good oral hygiene on a daily basis (it sounds like she’s already doing this, so it’s a good start!). This means brushing her teeth thoroughly at least 2-3 times a day (Don't forget your tongue!), using a mouthwash that does NOT contain alcohol. (TheraBreath has a really good mouthwash that's guaranteed to stop bad breath: http://www.therabr eath.com/productde tail.asp?cat=2 &pid=8), and flossing. Also, limit your consumption of foods that contain dairy products, which are notorious for causing bad breath. It's also a good idea to stay away from mints, candies, and chewing gum that have sugar in them. Bacteria feed off those sugars to reproduce and create sulfur compounds that cause odors in the mouth. To find out more on how to treat bad breath go to http://blog.therab reath.com which has informative articles about treating bad breath. I hope this helps!  (Jun 6, 2011 | post #103)

Halitosis

How Bad Is Your Breath? 14 Simple Tips For Reduce Mouth Odor

I'm no expert but think if you perhaps changed your diet, plus ate some regular non sweetened yougurt it might help. Absolutely, diet can affect your breath. Diet can also cause bad breath. Dairy foods, foods rich in sugar, a diet rich in meat products and alcohol can result in bad breath. If you are lactose intolerant, this might be the main cause of your bad breath. Dairy foods are notorious for creating bad breath. People that are lactose intolerant end up with more dense proteins available as bad breath fuel for the bacteria than those who have no problem with dairy foods (milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, etc.) The end result is a buildup of amino acids, which are easily converted into volatile sulfur compounds by the anaerobic bacteria found within the surface of your tongue and throat. To avoid bad breath, brush, floss and use an oral rinse without alcohol in it 2-3 times a day. Make sure you brush the roof of your mouth and your tongue as well. Eating crisp fruits and vegetables like apples and carrots can help too. There’s an article titled “Bad Breath Remedies That Work” here: http://blog.therab reath.com/2010/08/ bad-breath-remedie s-that-work/#more- 1234. It gives some more tips on how to avoid stinky breath. Something else you may want to try is an oral care probiotic. There’s a really good site that has tons of information on probiotics here: www.proprobiotics. com I hope this helps!  (Jun 6, 2011 | post #406)

Halitosis

Kick the butt

No I absolutely agree, it's just that there are other health/oral issues to think about too.  (Jun 6, 2011 | post #3)

Halitosis

Simple solutions

Yes it’s so true, crisp fruits and veggies, alcohol free mouthwash, tea tree oil and sugar free gum can all help stop bad breath. There are several things that may cause bad breath. Dry mouth and gum disease are often linked to bad breath. This is because the volatile sulfur producing compounds in our mouth that cause bad breath thrive in a dry, anaerobic environment. When our mouths are full of healthy, oxygen-rich saliva, then it is harder for the bacteria to thrive and create bad breath. Diet can also cause bad breath. Dairy foods, foods rich in sugar, a diet rich in meat products and alcohol can result in bad breath. If you are lactose intolerant, this might be the main cause of your bad breath. Dairy foods are notorious for creating bad breath. People that are lactose intolerant end up with more dense proteins available as bad breath fuel for the bacteria than those who have no problem with dairy foods (milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, etc.) The end result is a buildup of amino acids, which are easily converted into volatile sulfur compounds by the anaerobic bacteria found within the surface of your tongue and throat. To avoid bad breath, brush, floss and use an oral rinse without alcohol in it 2-3 times a day. Make sure you brush the roof of your mouth and your tongue as well. Eating crisp fruits and vegetables like apples and carrots can help too. There’s an article titled “Bad Breath Remedies That Work” here: http://blog.therab reath.com/2010/08/ bad-breath-remedie s-that-work/#more- 1234. It gives some more tips on how to avoid stinky breath. Also, have you ever considered taking an oral care probiotic? Studies have shown they can help with bad breath, throat and ear issues. There’s a really good site here: www.proprobiotics. com with tons of information. I hope this helps!  (May 31, 2011 | post #1)

Halitosis

Kick the butt

Yes, it’s true that smoking is bad for you and your teeth, breath and mouth. It’s not the actual smoking itself but smoking often causes Dry Mouth or Burning Tongue Syndrome. If your mouth is dry, that means that it isn’t producing enough saliva. Saliva is very rich in oxygen with makes it difficult for the anaerobic bacteria to produce sulfur – which is what causes bad breath. You can stop bad breath aka Smoker’s Breath by drinking plenty of water (8 glasses) each day, taking vitamin C and using mouthwash without alcohol in it. The alcohol in mouthwash will just dry your mouth out more. Try chewing sugar-free gum that actually increases saliva production. There’s an article with more tips and details here: http://www.therabr eath.com/art_drymo uth.asp  (May 31, 2011 | post #1)

Halitosis

Dealing With Halitosis

First of all, let me say that bad breath does not necessarily mean that person has poor oral hygiene. Do you brush your teeth and tongue regularly? Yes, it is important to brush your tongue, but I know that people with a sensitive gag reflex can really hate having to do it. It’s also important to brush the roof of your mouth too. Tongue scraping (and brushing) alone won’t fix bad breath and/or if you have white tongue. It depends on the shape and texture of your tongue, diet and a bunch of other things. Also, you can hurt your tongue if you scrape it too hard. You have to clean your tongue correctly. You can check out more about tongue coating here http://www.therabr eath.com/art_white tongue.asp and find out more about that yucky gunk on your tongue too. For the back of your tongue, try using a mouthwash without alcohol in it, that should help too. Try any of Therabreath’s mouthwashes. None of them contain alcohol and they are safe enough to swallow. There are several things that may cause bad breath. Dry mouth and gum disease are often linked to bad breath. This is because the volatile sulfur producing compounds in our mouth that cause bad breath thrive in a dry, anaerobic environment. When our mouths are full of healthy, oxygen-rich saliva, then it is harder for the bacteria to thrive and create bad breath. Diet can also cause bad breath. Dairy foods, foods rich in sugar, a diet rich in meat products and alcohol can result in bad breath. If you are lactose intolerant, this might be the main cause of your bad breath. Dairy foods are notorious for creating bad breath. People that are lactose intolerant end up with more dense proteins available as bad breath fuel for the bacteria than those who have no problem with dairy foods (milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, etc.) The end result is a buildup of amino acids, which are easily converted into volatile sulfur compounds by the anaerobic bacteria found within the surface of your tongue and throat. To avoid bad breath, brush, floss and use an oral rinse without alcohol in it 2-3 times a day. Make sure you brush the roof of your mouth and your tongue as well. Eating crisp fruits and vegetables like apples and carrots can help too. There’s an article titled “Bad Breath Remedies That Work” here: http://blog.therab reath.com/2010/08/ bad-breath-remedie s-that-work/#more- 1234. It gives some more tips on how to avoid stinky breath. Also, have you ever considered taking an oral care probiotic? Studies have shown they can help with bad breath, throat and ear issues. There’s a really good site here: www.proprobiotics. com with tons of information. I hope this helps!  (May 18, 2011 | post #1)

Halitosis

Dog Breath and Dental Care

I agree, you may want to take your cat to the vet specifically for his breath. They may have him have a thorough dental cleaning which requires anesthesia. The dog could have periodontal disease, it’s the number one disease in dogs and cats. The thorough cleaning at the vet’s would be a good start. I know some groomers also do non-anesthetic dental cleanings, but they aren’t as thorough. The vet will probably suggest toothpaste and regular manual brushings after the initial cleaning. You can also try an oral solution and put it directly on your pet’s gums. If your cat is too squeamish, there is an oral solution to help breath that you put in his water. You can read more about it here: http://www.therabr eath.com/art_dogs. asp I hope this helps!  (May 18, 2011 | post #1)

Halitosis

Column: Bad breath? It could be something serious

Yes I definitely agree. Gum disease often goes unnoticed and is only dealt with when it has become irreversible. If you are having problems with your gums, I would highly recommend products made specifically for gum care. Therabreath has a Perio Therapy line that I use and it has help with my sensitive gums and bleeding. Or perhaps even go deeper than just the surface and try an oral care probiotic. There's a good reference site here: www.proprobiotics. com. Good luck!  (May 18, 2011 | post #1)

Halitosis

World-Renown Halitosis Expert Named Official Spokesperson...

This sounds like an interesting product that could really help those of us that like garlic and onions. I think this used in conjunction with the proper oral care products could really be effective. I have also just started using an oral care probiotic that can help with bad breath, cavities, etc. If anyone is interested, you can learn more about oral care probiotics at http://www.proprob iotics.com/  (Apr 25, 2011 | post #3)

Halitosis

Don't ignore bleeding teeth

I could not agree more. Having any type of gum disease is definitely worth making a trip to the dentist. Many people have sensitive and/or bleeding gums and don’t even realize they have gum disease. I use PerioTherapy from Therabreath and have had great results. You can read more about gum disease here: http://www.therabr eath.com/art_gumdi sease.asp. Also, I would consider taking an oral care probiotic of some sort. Here’s a great site with tons of information on probiotics and its benefits: http://www.proprob iotics.com  (Apr 4, 2011 | post #1)

Halitosis

Tonsil issues with the Chihuahuas and other canines

I couldn’t agree more! I know it’s expensive, but it’s so important to have your dog checked out at the vet. They may have your dog have a thorough dental cleaning which requires anesthesia. The dog could have periodontal disease, it’s the number one disease in dogs and cats. The thorough cleaning at the vet’s would be a good start. I know some groomers also do non-anesthetic dental cleanings, but they aren’t as thorough. The vet will probably suggest toothpaste and regular manual brushings after the initial cleaning. You can also try an oral solution and put it directly on your pet’s gums. If your dog is too squeamish, there is an oral solution to help breath that you put in his or her water. You can read more about it here: http://www.therabr eath.com/art_dogs. asp I also give my dog Greenies and the occasional raw hide to chew on which helps remove some of the tartar build up, but the oral solution from therabreath is what really helped. The treats just help maintain the good breath. I hope this helps!  (Mar 21, 2011 | post #1)

Halitosis

My halitosis is gone. I can tell you what I did. Serious ...

Hi Hli, I know people can be very cruel and insensitive when it comes to bad breath. When you tried therabreath, did you follow the instructions? I’ve gotten amazing results and many of my friends have too. But you need to only use therabreath products and use the toothpaste on a dry toothbrush. Then you gargle with the mouthwash, don’t rinse with water at all when you’re using therabreath. Try it, it know it’s different but it really does work. Or have you thought about an oral care probiotic? Those may help with bad breath, cavities, etc. Learn more at http://www.proprob iotics.com . Good luck and keep smiling!  (Mar 21, 2011 | post #92)

Q & A with Phil_R