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REVIEWS - Crown Jakarta Capital Eco Management News: Envi...

http://news.xinhua net.com/english/in depth/2013-06/24/c _132480603.htm BEIJING, June 24 (Xinhuanet) -- The lingering poor air quality in Beijing and many other cities is a reminder of the serious challenge of pollution and the need to make greater efforts to protect the environment. It should prompt us to rethink our overall pollution-battling strategy and revamp our development philosophy so that environmental considerations become an integral part of economic development decision-making. While China has rapidly shaken off general poverty in the past three decades through economic reforms and opening-up, it has been facing increasingly serious environmental problems. The smothering smog in many parts of the country in recent months has made the headlines. But severe water pollution, ecological degradation and polluted soil, are also problems that demand immediate and effective solutions. That the authorities have become more conscious of the situation is undeniable, and they have never ceased to introduce measures to reduce the effect of environment damage. But as a manufacturing-base d economy, China must tackle the problem through making its economic growth less dependent on sectors that are heavily polluting. For example, China each year exports large numbers of textile, chemical and metallurgical products. But these sectors are also pollution-intensiv e, meaning China has to shoulder the environmental costs while providing low-priced quality products for the global market. Behind the unbalanced cost-benefit sharing scenario, ostensibly, is the low environmental standards and loose implementation of environmental protection rules. At the root is the GDP-oriented mentality that puts economic growth above all. The central authorities have put forward the idea of economic restructuring in recent years, which rightly seeks a balance among growth, the environment and sustainability. But it is yet to be embraced by all government departments and officials. It is time the nation made the hard but necessary choice to seek a better environment at the cost of economic growth. In reality, it will be an insurmountable challenge for local officials to make that choice unless the flawed performance assessment system, which remains centered on growth figures, is reformed to include environmental soundness.  (Jun 26, 2013 | post #1)

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Crown Capital Eco Management Jakarta - Standing up for Re...

The RET has been in operation for 12 years and over that time has generated $18.5 billion in new investment, lowered electricity prices by 8% and created tens of thousands of jobs – mainly in regional and rural areas. If retained in its current form, the RET will repeat this performance over its remaining 17 years of operation. Andy Divall, Managing Director of Divall’s Earthmoving and Bulk Haulage said the RET is making a massive difference to regional NSW. “In the 25 years we have been in business we haven’t seen anything like the opportunities the renewables industry will bring the region.” Chris McIntosh, owner of Boorowa’s historic Courthouse Hotel agrees and hopes that renewable projects in the area will stimulate the local accommodation market. Each wind turbine leaves at least $43,000 per annum in the community in which it is built, and often considerably more . Paul Magee, a landholder from Boorowa, said "Every time a drought rolls around not only do we lose income, our on-farm environment suffers. Renewable energy projects are an opportunity to make us stronger and improve the environment on our farms." (Related coverage: Collector calls for windfarm halt) Landholders experienced with living and working around wind turbines also offered their perspective. Joan Limon a farmer from Tarago said "There are six turbines on my property. They take up very little land. The closest is 800m from my house and they don't worry me, my sheep, or my cattle." However the group recognises that development models could be improved. "What we need is for all parties to sit down and work out how we can make these projects assist everybody in our community", said Crookwell farmer and prospective wind farm host, Charlie Prell. "We need to ensure that wind energy developments leave a fair share of the profit in the bush. Regional Australia has struggled to attract urban investment for 200 years, renewables are a great way for this to happen", he said. The group will call for a commitment from both major parties to the current large-scale renewable target of 41,000 GWh by 2020. A reduction in the size or an extension of the timing of this target will render many NSW renewable energy projects unviable. "Over seventy per cent of Australians want more wind energy" said Robert Dulhunty, a landholder from Glen Innes, "and along with sheep, beef and wool, I want to be able to able to supply it to them. I call for a bipartisan support for the current 2020 target which is vital for continued investment in the renewable sector."  (Jun 18, 2013 | post #2)

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Crown Capital Eco Management Jakarta - Standing up for Re...

http://www.goulbur npost.com.au/story /1578087/standing- up-for-renewable-e nergy-target/?cs=1 2 HE NSW Regional Renewables Alliance, representing farmers and rural businesses at Tuesday's Rally4Renewables in Canberra, is calling for bipartisan support for the current Renewable Energy Target (RET) of 41,000GWh by 2020. To Read More Articles, Follow Us on: http://pages.redif f.com/crown-capita l-management-jakar ta-indonesia/18017 44 http://crowncapita leco.tumblr.com/  (Jun 18, 2013 | post #1)

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Jakarta Crown Eco Management: the Stress of Being Ginseng

http://www.nsf.gov /discoveries/disc_ summ.jsp?cntn_id=1 28122&org=NSF &from=news/ This article is the sixth in a series on NSF's Long Term Research in Environmental Biology (LTREB) awards. Visit parts one, two,three, four, and five. “We entered a vale at 5 o'clock, then crossed a run and rode along a rich level for several miles, and under the delightful protection of very tall trees that brought us to a creek...where we lodged surrounded by ginseng. --John Bartram, 1751, Travels from Pensilvania to Onandaga, Oswego and Lake Ontario in Canada” Being surrounded by ginseng--a low-growing green-leafed herb of North American forests--may have been common in 1751, but today? Ginseng is under siege. Biologist James McGraw of West Virginia University should know. Today on World Environment Day, and indeed every day, McGraw says that we can learn much about the environment around us from one small plant. Funded by a National Science Foundation (NSF) Long Term Research in Environmental Biology (LTREB) grant, McGraw and colleagues peer into the lives of more than 4,000 individual ginseng plants each year to see how they're faring. "These understory plants are subject to all manner of [environmental] stresses," says McGraw. "After a while, you begin to wonder why there are any left."  (Jun 8, 2013 | post #1)