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NBA Basketball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 28, 2003

Although he excelled at cricket and soccer growing up in Kingston, Jamaica, Patrick Aloysius Ewing rose from poor beginnings to become one of the 50 greatest players in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). After his parents immigrated to the United States, settling in Cambridge, Mass., Ewing, his brother and five sisters would follow four years later when family funds permitted. In spite of a marked Jamaican accent, Ewing was determined to succeed academically since entering grade school, taking summer school classes and obtaining help from tutors to ensure his education would not stop at the high school level. Ewing first shot a basketball in a neighborhood pick-up game at the age of 12, quickly learning the game as he grew to six feet six inches by eighth grade, drawing the attention of several prep basketball head coaches. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-28-2003  (Feb 28, 2011 | post #1)

Major League Baseball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 27, 2006

In an era when women and blacks were viewed as second-class citizens and were not considered qualified to compete at baseball’s highest level, Effa L. Manley became a pioneer by breaking down the national pastime’s racial barriers while hurdling the additional obstacle of gender bias. Born on March 27, 1900 in Philadelphia, PA, Manley was raised in a household with a black stepfather and black half-siblings and chose to live as a black person despite having white biological parents. Upon graduating from high school, Manley moved to New York, where she met her future husband, Abe Manley, during the 1932 World Series at Yankee Stadium. “Babe Ruth made a baseball fan of me,” Manley once said. “I used to go to Yankee Stadium just to see him come to bat.” Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-27-2006  (Feb 28, 2011 | post #1)

NFL Football

This Day in Black Sports History: February 26, 1973

Compared to Gale Sayers, Roger Craig and Thurman Thomas coming out of San Diego State University, Marshall William Faulk would live up to the hype by becoming the most versatile running back in National Football League history. Born on Feb. 26, 1973 in New Orleans, La., Faulk, the youngest of six boys, was raised in the Desire Housing Projects, one of the most crime-ravaged, oppressed projects in the United States. Nevertheless, while many of his childhood friends fell into crime and drugs, with some dying early violent deaths, Faulk turned to football at the age of seven while his mother worked odd jobs to support her sons. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-26-1973  (Feb 27, 2011 | post #1)

Boxing

This Day in Black Sports History: February 25, 1964

“I don’t have a mark on my face and I upset Sonny Liston and I just turned 22 years old; I must be the greatest!” Those were the immortal words uttered by Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. on Feb. 25, 1964 in Miami, Fla., fresh off upsetting a heavily favored Sonny Liston to win the World Heavyweight Championship of professional boxing. By dethroning the reigning champion, Clay became the youngest man to win the heavyweight title, a distinction he would own for over twenty years until Mike Tyson burst onto the scene. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-25-1964- 1  (Feb 26, 2011 | post #1)

NCAA Basketball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 24, 1998

Although she suffered a season-ending injury in the penultimate game of her college basketball career, Nykesha Simone Sales left the University of Connecticut (UConn) as the Huskies’ all-time leading scorer. In her first three seasons, Sales helped lead UConn to a NCAA Championship and two Elite Eight appearances, while winning the Rookie of the Year Award in her freshman campaign and Big East Player of the Year honors during her junior season. Sales also distinguished herself on the defensive end of the court, capturing the Defensive Player of the Year Award in a stellar junior campaign as well. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-24-1998  (Feb 25, 2011 | post #1)

NBA Basketball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 23, 1986

Throughout his 20-year career in the National Basketball Association, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s trademark sky hook was virtually untouchable, much like the records he held upon his retirement in 1989. But since his early years growing up in New York City, Abdul-Jabbar was destined to secure his place among basketball royalty. In high school, Abdul-Jabbar, known as Lew Alcindor, Jr. before converting to Sunni Islam, led Power Memorial Academy, to a 71-game winning streak, a 79-2 overall record and three consecutive New York City Catholic championships. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-23-1986  (Feb 24, 2011 | post #1)

NBA Basketball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 22, 2007

This day in black sports history marks the fourth anniversary of the sudden and tragic passing of a man Larry Bird called “best I ever played with” and whom Earvin ‘Magic’ Johnson lauded as “the best backcourt defender of all-time.” These poignant words represent a mere microcosm of how respected Dennis Wayne Johnson was, and still is, throughout the National Basketball Association. Born the eighth of sixteen children on Sept. 18, 1954 in Compton, Johnson, who lacked the size and talent to compete with his peers in high school, excelled on the street basketball circuit while working several odd jobs upon his graduation. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-22-2007  (Feb 22, 2011 | post #1)

NBA Basketball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 21, 2003

Although in the twilight of his career, with nothing left to prove, Michael Jeffrey Jordan continued his assault on the National Basketball Association’s record books. Born in Brooklyn and raised in Wilmington, N.C., Jordan was motivated to prove his worth since he failed to make his high school’s varsity basketball team as a sophomore. So upon earning a spot on the varsity roster, it should come as no surprise that Jordan tallied approximately 20 points per game over his final two seasons of play, including averaging a triple-double—29.2 points, 11.6 rebounds and 10.1 assists—during his senior season. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-21-2003  (Feb 21, 2011 | post #1)

NBA Basketball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 20, 2011

When Western Conference head coach Gregg Popovich called his number in the first quarter of the 60th NBA All-Star Game, Blake Austin Griffin became a part of black sports history at the tender age of 21. After his participation in the T-Mobile Rookie Challenge, in which he scored 14 points, and his rousing victory in the Sprite Slam Dunk Contest, Griffin’s entry into the annual showcase marked the first time in league history a player has taken part in all three events during All-Star Weekend. The historic achievement was merely another highlight reel in what has been a memorable rookie season for the Los Angeles Clippers superstar power forward, who’s averaging 22.8 points and 12.6 rebounds in the first 56 games of his blossoming career. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-20-2011  (Feb 20, 2011 | post #1)

NBA Basketball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 19, 1996

Seemingly lost among his colorful and controversial comments both during and after he retired from the game was the fact that Charles Wade Barkley was one of the greatest players in the National Basketball Association’s 64-year history. Born and raised in Leeds, Alabama, Barkley stood at 5’10” and weighed 220 pounds when he failed to make the Leeds High School basketball varsity team. But after growing six inches during the summer, Barkley earned a starting position as a senior, a year in which he averaged 19.1 points and 17.9 rebounds per game in the process of leading the team to a 26-3 record and a berth in the state high school semifinals. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-19-1996  (Feb 19, 2011 | post #1)

NBA Basketball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 18, 1986

In the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA), only four players have recorded a quadruple-double, which is the accumulation of double-digit number totals in four of five statistical categories—points, rebounds, assists, steals, and blocked shots—in a game. “The reason why [quadruple-double] is such a hard thing to accomplish is because it requires a player to be completely dominant on both ends of the court without being too selfish—so he can get the assists—without fouling out trying to block every shot or grab every rebound. A lot of guys can get the points, rebounds and assists, but it’s the defensive stuff that messes everybody up. You have to love defense to get a quadruple-double. There’s no way around it.”— Nate Thurmond Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-18-1986  (Feb 18, 2011 | post #1)

NFL Football

This Day in Black Sports History: February 17, 1936

In the summer of 1966, James Nathaniel Brown stunned the sports world with the announcement of his retirement from the Cleveland Browns while still in the prime of his NFL career. But those short nine seasons, in which he terrorized opposing defenses, saw Brown firmly establish himself as one of the greatest players to ever step on the gridiron. Born in 1936 on St. Simon’s Island, off the coast of Georgia, Brown was raised by his great-grandmother after his father, a former professional boxer, left the family when he was still an infant. When he turned seven, Brown would eventually join his mother in Long Island, NY, where she had found work as a housekeeper. Life up north was initially a culture shock for Brown, who managed to get into a fight on his first morning at Manhasset Valley grade school. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-17-1936  (Feb 17, 2011 | post #1)

Boxing

This Day in Black Sports History: February 16, 1970

As the only American boxer to emerge from the 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games with a gold medal, Joseph William Frazier had an extremely bright future ahead of him. After the Olympics, a group of local businessmen invested in Frazier’s professional career so that he could train full-time. When he made his professional debut in 1965, Frazier, a hungry, young southpaw from Beaufort, S.C., did not disappoint, defeating Woody Goss via technical knockout (TKO) in the first round. This would become a recurring theme throughout the first half of Frazier’s career. In his first 24 fights, Frazier, appropriately nicknamed “Smokin’ Joe”, registered 21 knockouts, with the majority of those victories occurring within four rounds. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-16-1970  (Feb 17, 2011 | post #1)

Boxing

This Day in Black Sports History: February 14, 1951

It goes without saying that Valentine’s Day is an annual commemoration, celebrating love and affection between intimate companions. However, sixty years ago, love and affection would be the last words used to characterize how Sugar Ray Robinson treated Jake LaMotta in the Chicago Stadium on Feb. 14, 1951. After going professional in 1940, Robinson campaigned as a welterweight. However, he moved up to the middleweight division due an increasing difficulty with making the 147 lb. welterweight limit. Prior to making his mark in a new weight class, Robinson had already established himself as the greatest welterweight to ever lace up a pair of boxing gloves, losing only once in 123 professional fights. Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-14-1951  (Feb 14, 2011 | post #1)

Major League Baseball

This Day in Black Sports History: February 13, 1920

Before Jackie Robinson broke the Major League Baseball color barrier in 1947, the Negro leagues provided the only arena for aspiring African-American players to showcase their talents on a wider scale. That arena was created on Feb. 13, 1920, with the establishment of the Negro National League (NNL), the first black professional baseball league, at a YMCA in Kansas City, Mo. Andrew “Rube” Foster, considered the best African-American pitcher of the 1900s, was the driving force behind the league’s organization, and served as its president. With member teams in the South and Midwest, the NNL successfully operated until 1931, and as a result of his leadership role in the early years, Foster came to be known as “the father of black baseball.” Click below to read the rest of this article at Examiner.com. http://www.examine r.com/sports-in-ne w-york/this-day-bl ack-sports-history -february-13-1920  (Feb 13, 2011 | post #1)

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