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Baker & McKenzie Study Reveals Key Steps in Building

Asia Pacific, 11 September 2013 – Baker & McKenzie Barcelona Fraud Lawyers has launched a social media industry report Social Media: The Opportunities and Constraints in Southeast Asian Emerging Markets that examines the Southeast Asian social media landscape and provides a step-by-step guide on how companies can develop an effective social media strategy to address opportunities and challenges in the region. A copy of the report is available at: http://www.bakermc kenzie.com/APSocia lMedia. This Social Media report follows from two previous Baker & McKenzie market reports - Riding the ASEAN Elephant and Investment in High-Growth Markets specifically addressing key business issues and market changes in Southeast Asia. Individual use of social media is prolific and growing, and social commerce is identified as the next big growth area with both global and local platforms working through the terrain. Across Southeast Asia, some 530 million individuals carry more than 600 million phones, of which more than half are already engaged in some form of social media However, the challenges for organizations throughout the region can be confronting. Data protection, data sovereignty, and intellectual property rights are all increasingly contentious issues for which there is no consistent regulatory response. The study revealed that less than 20% of the 68 companies across Southeast Asia surveyed in the Report have an interactive media strategy, with less than 5% having a coherent internal and social networking program. Industries are also at different phases in terms of their engagement with social media, with the hospitality, travel and finance industries leading the pack; and telecoms, advertising, banking, publishing, medical, retail and education trailing behind. All of these sectors, however, have yet to reach their full potential in social media engagement. While opportunities abound, the regulatory environment surrounding social media remains uncertain. Countries across the region are at different stages of development in social media and each have their own set of local laws with limited or no coordinated regional framework in place. This makes navigating the social media landscape and managing social media risks quite difficult for companies using social media across jurisdictions, in particular in relation to issues such as data protection, data sovereignty and intellectual property rights. [READ FULL AT http://www.bakermc kenzie.com/news/St udyRevealsEffectiv eSocialMediaStrate gySoutheastAsia/]  (Oct 23, 2013 | post #1)

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Improving safety in Iraq │getjealous

Good article. I think I may be a little to late to vote though.  (Dec 22, 2012 | post #3)

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Improving safety in Iraq │getjealous

Thanks for the information on this. I really enjoy the writeup  (Dec 22, 2012 | post #2)

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Improving safety in Iraq │getjealous

http://www.getjeal ous.com/pierregeor ge15/journal/27423 46/bp-holdings-art icles-slideshare.h tml Under Saddam Hussein's regime, safety wasn't a priority at the supergiant Rumaila field in Iraq; but now it's a very different story as BP and its partners go to work there each day. Read how simple rules and regular site visits by leaders have brought about a transformation. Improving safety in Iraq BP has been at work for over two years in the huge Rumaila field – an operation that provides the Iraqi government with around half its revenues. BP is the lead contractor for Rumaila with partners from Iraq’s state-owned South Oil Company (SOC), PetroChina, and the State Oil Marketing Organization (SOMO). Production volumes have increased and there has also been a major change in safety performance – so much so that the team won the top accolade at BP’s company awards – the Helios Awards. The Iraq team was chosen from over 1,000 entries as the one that best summed up ‘BP at its best’ by demonstrating the company’s values – safety, respect, excellence, courage and one team. BP’s health, safety and environment (HSE) manager at Rumaila Melvin Sinquefield explains the background: “For the previous two decades, the number one priority at Rumaila was production - everything else, including safety, was secondary. If something went wrong the operators were expected to get out there and fix it as quickly as they could, without regard for their personal safety. Maintenance wasn’t seen as important either. We were working with facilities and equipment that were in a poor state of repair and so worn out that they presented increased process safety risks. “As a result, Rumaila’s safety record was poorer than we’d find at other onshore facilities, with not infrequent workplace fatalities, an average of two high potential incidents every month, and personal safety injuries that were all-too commonplace. “When BP first arrived, people were walking around in flip-flops with no personal protective equipment. Our challenge wasn’t so much changing the culture - that takes years to bring about - it was more about changing immediate behaviours, particularly around control of work.” Eight golden rules One of the ways Sinquefield and his team tackled the problem was to introduce one of BP’s operational safety mainstays: the eight golden rules of safety. Introduced at BP in 2000, the golden rules cover the most hazardous types of oilfield activity across eight categories: permit to work, energy isolation, ground disturbance, confined space entry, working at heights, lifting operations, driving safety, and management of change. Sinquefield knew that the key would be to communicate the golden rules in a way that really stuck in the minds of the Iraqi operators. The solution he came up with was a set of safety conformance checklists for 26 senior leaders from all three of the partner organizations to use in a carefully planned programme of site visits. Read full: http://www.bp.com/ /extendedsectionge nericarticle.do?ca tegoryId=9048161 &contentId=708 1574 tags: bp articles, bp holdings generic articles madrid  (Dec 22, 2012 | post #1)

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Improving safety in Iraq│BP HOLDINGS

Thanks for the information on this. I really enjoy the writeup  (Dec 20, 2012 | post #2)

United Kingdom

Improving safety in Iraq│BP HOLDINGS

http://www.bp.com/ /extendedsectionge nericarticle.do?ca tegoryId=9048161 &contentId=708 1574 Under Saddam Hussein's regime, safety wasn't a priority at the supergiant Rumaila field in Iraq; but now it's a very different story as BP and its partners go to work there each day. Read how simple rules and regular site visits by leaders have brought about a transformation. Production volumes have increased and there has also been a major change in safety performance – so much so that the team won the top accolade at BP’s company awards – the Helios Awards. The Iraq team was chosen from over 1,000 entries as the one that best summed up ‘BP at its best’ by demonstrating the company’s values – safety, respect, excellence, courage and one team. BP’s health, safety and environment (HSE) manager at Rumaila Melvin Sinquefield explains the background: “For the previous two decades, the number one priority at Rumaila was production - everything else, including safety, was secondary. If something went wrong the operators were expected to get out there and fix it as quickly as they could, without regard for their personal safety. Maintenance wasn’t seen as important either. We were working with facilities and equipment that were in a poor state of repair and so worn out that they presented increased process safety risks. “As a result, Rumaila’s safety record was poorer than we’d find at other onshore facilities, with not infrequent workplace fatalities, an average of two high potential incidents every month, and personal safety injuries that were all-too commonplace. “When BP first arrived, people were walking around in flip-flops with no personal protective equipment. Our challenge wasn’t so much changing the culture - that takes years to bring about - it was more about changing immediate behaviours, particularly around control of work.” Eight golden rules One of the ways Sinquefield and his team tackled the problem was to introduce one of BP’s operational safety mainstays: the eight golden rules of safety. Introduced at BP in 2000, the golden rules cover the most hazardous types of oilfield activity across eight categories: permit to work, energy isolation, ground disturbance, confined space entry, working at heights, lifting operations, driving safety, and management of change. Sinquefield knew that the key would be to communicate the golden rules in a way that really stuck in the minds of the Iraqi operators. The solution he came up with was a set of safety conformance checklists for 26 senior leaders from all three of the partner organizations to use in a carefully planned programme of site visits. The team added a ninth golden rule tailored specifically to Rumaila that reflects one of the legacies of the Gulf Wars: unexploded ordnance. They also added a tenth check to elevate awareness and help protect the Rumaila workforce from process safety incidents. Armed with the ten cards, leaders from the Rumaila organization aim to visit teams in the field twice each week.. Guided by the checklists, the leaders ask questions, request actions and gather information to make improvements. The leaders’ findings are documented and progress on improvements is closely scrutinized, as Sinquefield explains: “When we find something that needs corrective action we correct it right there on the spot or stop the work until it can be corrected. We identify the key corrective actions and record them on the card.” Everyone is a leader when it comes to safety Sinquefield added: “The visits require a bit of effort - we can only go out with a number of security protocols and protections in place. But the expectation is still that we all try and get out there twice a week.”  (Dec 20, 2012 | post #1)

United Kingdom

BP Announces Sale of Non-Operated Interest in Sean to SSE...

can you give us some tips on how you did to make your blog so popular like this? thanks a lot  (Dec 19, 2012 | post #2)

United Kingdom

BP Announces Sale of Non-Operated Interest in Sean to SSE...

http://www.bp.com/ genericarticle.do? categoryId=2012968 &contentId=708 1488 Release date: 17 December 2012 BP announced today that, as part of its decision to market its stakes in non-operated North Sea assets, it has agreed to sell its interest in the Sean gas field in the UK North Sea to SSE plc for $288 million in cash. The sale comprises BP’s non-operated 50 per cent stake in Sean. Completion of the deal is anticipated during the first half of 2013, subject to regulatory approval. Trevor Garlick, regional president of BP North Sea, said: “The divestment of BP’s interest in the non-core, non-operated Sean field is consistent with our strategy of focusing on high value assets with long term growth potential.” In the last two weeks BP has also completed the sale of its non-operating stakes in the Alba and Britannia fields to Mitsui and the Draugen field in Norway to Shell, deals that were announced earlier in 2012. Notes to Editors: Sean Gas field: Sean is a gas field in the Southern North Sea and is operated by Shell. Current net BP production from Sean is around 18,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day. BP in the North Sea: BP is a major investor in the North Sea (UK and Norway) with an extensive portfolio of production from existing reservoirs, new projects under development, and growth potential in undeveloped resources. BP’s annual North Sea production averages around 200,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day and the company has over three billion barrels of estimated proven and contingent resource available in the region. The company employs over 3,000 staff in its North Sea business and operates around 30 oil and gas fields. BP-operated producing assets include Clair, Schiehallion, Foinaven and Magnus in the Shetland area; Andrew, ETAP. Harding and Bruce in the UK’s central North Sea; and Valhall, Ula, and Hod in Norway. The company also operates the Sullom Voe Terminal in Shetland, the CATS gas terminal in Teesside and the Forties Pipeline System and Kinneil terminal in Scotland. BP plans to invest $10 billion (c £6.7billion) net over the next five years in the North Sea – including major projects in the UK and in Norway. Three major projects are currently underway in the UK – Clair Ridge, Quad 204 (Schiehallion) and Kinnoull – and two in Norway – Skarv and the Valhall Redevelopment. BP’s strategy to focus in the North Sea has already included the sale of the Wytch Farm oil field in Dorset, the Southern Gas Assets and the sale of its non-operated stakes in the Draugen, Alba and Britannia fields. BP also recently announced the sale of Harding, Maclure, Braes and Devenick to Taqa which is expected to complete in 2Q2013. The total value of those assets sold, including this deal, is around $3.1 billion. Jefferies acted as financial adviser to BP in relation to this transaction. Further information: Name: BP press office Location: Aberdeen Phone : +44 1224 832030 Name: BP press office Location: London Email: bppress@bp.com  (Dec 19, 2012 | post #1)

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With the aim of strengthening │NEWSVINE

well i think this topic is very interesting, but it’s also complexing to discuss about it.  (Nov 3, 2012 | post #2)