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South Florida Sun-Sentinel

FAA thwarts Fort Lauderdale's bid to keep Orioles in town

Not to rain on your points here, but I think you missed a few things. 1. There are no hundreds of thousands that show up for spring training. I used to work at FXE for 6 years and drove around the stadium during spring training games. A crowd of a few hundred maybe on a busy day. 2. They tried a soccer league, it played for a year or two and then folded. Been there and done that, didn't work. English speaking or not, the team folded. The bottom line is, the city can't build something on a Federal property zoned for aviation and use it for sports. The other bottom line is, the constant crying of poverty by MLB so we have to pay for stadiums and fund spring training, while they pay tens of millions in salaries and make hundreds of millions, is getting old and worn and we simply don't buy it anymore. If they can't afford to rent a space for spring training, then go home or train in Nebraska.  (Jul 3, 2008 | post #44)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

FAA thwarts Fort Lauderdale's bid to keep Orioles in town

Does that include the Russians posting from Orlando?  (Jul 3, 2008 | post #40)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

FAA thwarts Fort Lauderdale's bid to keep Orioles in town

Almost all general aviation goes to FXE, Tamiami and Perry. The runways aren't being extended for GA aircraft, they are being expanded for cargo and large jets. As far as people buying houses next to the airport and then complaining about aircraft noise.... For some reason I don't think you take Greyhound when you travel out of state...  (Jul 3, 2008 | post #39)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

FAA thwarts Fort Lauderdale's bid to keep Orioles in town

I think that is a bit of a weak argument. If I built a stadium on a federal airport property and used it for years for purposes it was not zoned for, I don't think that creates precedent in any way. I could open up a oil change shop in my garage and run a business in a residential neighborhood, then when the city came and said I can't run the business in a residence, can I claim it has been like that for a decade and it is legal because it grandfathered itself in? Breaking the rules doesn't create precedent, it simply means they didn't get caught before. The Orioles will spend $67.2 million on players salaries for 2008. Is there anyone that believes they can't afford to rent the stadium for their spring training? Why can MLB pay billions in salaries and make tens of billions in tickets, merchandising, salaries, etc.etc.etc. But they can't rent a spring training facility and build their own stadiums??? Baseball is a business. If they can't afford stadiums to play, their business model isn't sound and they should close. Just like every other business in town.  (Jul 3, 2008 | post #38)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Rush Limbaugh sets new deal

The fat windbag will be feeding his drug habit and his herd of sheep for a few more years. Yawn* Must be a slow news day. AM radio is going the way of the 8 track and the fat stoned one is only a french fry away from needing another bypass. Oh well, someone got to feed the trailer crowd their daily dose of BS, since they can't afford cable anymore and are missing the Fake News "balanced " BS diet. Three hours a day of bogus BS that anyone with a half a brain cell can spot a mile away. No wonder the right wing crowd is dumber than a bag of hammers.  (Jul 2, 2008 | post #97)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

FAA thwarts Fort Lauderdale's bid to keep Orioles in town

Why is the city and the county subsidizing baseball anyways??? Can't MLB with billions in revenue buy their own stadiums and pay for their own training. This moronic sports welfare for a monopoly organization out to enrich itself on the public dime has gone far enough. Time to re-open the anti-trust exemptions and make this for profit corporation follow the law like everyone else. The sports cry babies can go to the park and watch little league, it is a kids game after all, played by overpaid adults.  (Jul 2, 2008 | post #3)

What if gas cost $10 a gallon?

Unfortunately, every site quotes the same Williams guy that says he has super secret squirrel information about giant oil deposits that all the oil companies and the government is hiding from us. All the information is stashed in the same vault GM keeps the drawings of their 100MPG car they invented 30 years ago and never put in production, and the Area 51 UFO drawings that the little green men landed a few decades back. Makes for a fascinating reading material, but unfortunately is only found it the fiction section of the library. I also have a drawing of a fusion reactor that is the size of a blender I invented 12 years ago and will power your car with leftover pizza for 200 years. Just send $99.95 plus a SASE and I'll mail it to you asap...  (Jun 26, 2008 | post #3295)

What if gas cost $10 a gallon?

No apologies necessary. The math becomes complex between countries with factors such as taxes, liters, kilometers, etc. so its easy to get off track and make mistakes. I haven't seen any data that the U.S. drug companies sell at a loss to other countries. It is simply that they pay less for larger purchases. It is cheaper for companies to make large orders and large shipments, so their profit margins remain steady since their material costs go down also with their own suppliers with larger orders. I agree with your point that our generosity is often under reported. But we have also been involved in supporting some shady characters and that has undermined our credibility (the Shah of Iran, Pinochet, Noriega, Saudi Royal family, etc). So while I agree we have often been the good guys when the world didn't care, we have had our 3 Stooges moments where we went into some seriously questionable ventures where world couldn't believe its own eyes (Vietnam, Iraq). It is also difficult for us to take the moral high ground on energy use when we use 25% of the world energy with 4% of the population.  (Jun 26, 2008 | post #3293)

What if gas cost $10 a gallon?

The dark side of oil shale extraction, besides the extreme environmental impact is the impracticality of it. Standard oil drilling in the existing fields is normally around 50:1. It takes around 1 barrel of oil to make 50 barrels of oil. Oil shale is 3.5:1. It takes one barrel of oil to make 3.5 barrels. We are talking about taking 800 billion barrels of oil, and using 228 billion barrels to get the 800, netting only 571 barrels total. That doesn't even account for the ruggedness of Colorado, actually getting to the deposits and building the infrastructure to extract it. There is a reason the oil companies won't touch it with a 10 foot pole. Even they can see the idea is not only impractical, it is completely insane. The people of Colorado are not going to go for turning their state into a toxic waste dump of solvent ponds. I think we'll be able to look North to Canada in a few years and it will be considered the dark ages of energy extraction. Future generations are going to be completely astounded by the insanity that went on, just like we look back on the rivers catching fire and wondering what those people were thinking.  (Jun 26, 2008 | post #3292)

What if gas cost $10 a gallon?

Where exactly do you get the data that shows anything of what you mention is true? Oil shale is light sweet crude??? We can supply the planet with oil for hundreds of years? Based on what consumption rate? The estimated total oil shale in the entire country is around 2 trillion barrels. Based on global oil consumption of around 32 billion barrels a year, assuming you can recover 100% of deposits, we are talking about 60 years, not several hundred. Actual recovery estimates are around 800 billion, so that covers less than 30 years. Oil shale recovery uses several barrels of water for each barrel of oil. 2 Trillion barrels of oil would mean around 8 to 10 Trillion barrels of water. The entire Lake Superior only has 76 billion barrels of water. To heat the oil would take trillions of cubic feet of natural gas, since oil shale has to be heated to 700 degrees to make it flow. That doesn't even touch on the environmental impacts, costs and various other factors. What you present is a total fantasy.  (Jun 25, 2008 | post #3276)

What if gas cost $10 a gallon?

Not to kill your point, but gas is just north of $9 a gallon in the Netherlands, so for $109, you would only get around 12 gallons, not 27. There is also a difference between Communist and Socialist governments, and any government can make anything compulsory, as long as it passes its branches of government. The U.S. congress just raised the CAFE standards, signed by the president. Congress and the Senate can outlaw SUV's tomorrow if they wanted to, it would be unpopular, but not impossible. Same goes for movies. The U.S. restricts alcohol and tobacco advertising, requires censorship in broadcasting, requires movie edits and has a variety of other media rules. The government type is irrelevant to rule making. The rest of the world pays less for medications for several reasons. They ban drug advertising, which accounts for a large portion of drug costs you pay in the U.S. Also, almost the entire world outside of the U.S. has socialized medicine in some form, which means the governments of those countries negotiate drug prices based on large purchases for the population. Economies of scale equals lower prices. Your point about the U.S. being generous is accurate however. The U.S. is more generous than most nations and should receive more credit for what it does. The reason it doesn't is often arrogance, or perceived arrogance on the U.S. behalf. Much of our generocity comes with strings attached, some of the strings are exporting our cultural values that may or may not be compatible with the values of the nation receiving our help. The U.S. doesn't have a generocity problem, it has a image problem, and frequently it is caused by our ignorance of other countries and self proclaimed superiority.  (Jun 25, 2008 | post #3275)

What if gas cost $10 a gallon?

I'm rather surprised that Australia didn't figure this out a long time ago. It appears pretty easy to lay tracks across the desert and connect the cities, especially for transporting goods between the coasts. It looks like a large portion of the world completely forgot to plan for the peak oil production and related price increases. The only bright spot is that a large portion of current prices is probably related to speculation, and it might actually awaken some nations to plan for the future, the U.S. included. At least the U.S. mandated low sulfur diesel oil, it has made diesel exhaust a little more tolerable. The new trucks and cars with the diesel type catalytic converters are surprisingly clean now. Hopefully having the world dragged kicking and screaming into the oil reality will have a lasting impression this time. For the U.S., the third time might be a charm...  (Jun 25, 2008 | post #3274)

What if gas cost $10 a gallon?

Last statistic I saw mentioned that around 65% of people live in the 100 largest metro areas and are 75% of the total economy. We are not even close to having the transit we need and should have between large metro areas even considering the size and distances involved, and we are far behind most other Western countries in that area also. It is not any more complex to build a train between Florida and New York than between Paris and London. They planned for it, be were to busy driving and flying while oil was cheap. Our first hint of future energy problems started with Nixon in 1973, not Carter. During the 1973 Arab and Israeli conflict, the OPEC countries put an embargo on the U.S. as a punishment for the U.S. support of Israel. We should have known then that importing 60% of our oil is not only dumb economically, but is a large national security issue. There is no physical way for the U.S. to produce 21 million barrels of oil per day, no matter how much we drill. The same goes with our large foreign debt. Our enemies don't even have to invade anymore. China and a few Middle Eastern countries could collapse our economy by simply dumping their huge dollar reserves on the market, sparking a U.S. hyper inflation and a total economic meltdown. Sad that the country has a huge potential but has up until this point had a total lack of planning and a non-existent energy policy. Hopefully our current wake up call will change that, although our prior track record is less than promising.  (Jun 24, 2008 | post #3254)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Sales of premium gas plunge: 'Nobody can afford it'

For all the Rocket Scientists here calling everyone else morons, here are some facts. Higher octane gas is used in higher performance engines that have higher compression ratios, 10:1 is typical and requires Premium fuel (91 or higher). Higher octane is resistance to DETONATION, not ignition. Gas can't be resistant to ignition, otherwise it wouldn't burn. Recent High performance cars that require Premium lower their compression ratio when they sense detonation, using a knock sensor on each cylinder to sense that condition. This lowers HP, lowers efficiency, and lowers gas mileage. Most foreign V6 cars that exceed 200HP should be run on Premium gas. The lower gas mileage and lost performance are not worth the $5 a tank you might save.  (Jun 22, 2008 | post #230)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Sales of premium gas plunge: 'Nobody can afford it'

Only problem with that is Turkey Point uses Freshwater, not Seawater for cooling its reactors. Hence the application to expand Turkey Point is facing resistance due to its increase in freshwater use in a Florida drought. Look up the FPL expansion request, and you'll see my point...  (Jun 22, 2008 | post #229)

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