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Martinsville, VA

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All of those posts is Protester speak. How can an invisible church forgive sins or not, loosen or bind, have the keys to the Kingdom? The Church is the pillar and foundation of Truth and Jesus started a Church with all Authority. Whoever hears his Church hears Christ and his Father. Do you have enough Faith to hear Christ?  (8 hrs ago | post #431)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

You claim to have faith in Jesus. What was the most important thing he did before he ascended? Start a Church or give us a book? You don't have that much faith do you?  (11 hrs ago | post #426)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

Who said any thing about faith in Church. If you have the full faith in Christ, you would be in the Church. You have a faith on your own terms. Whatever you want that faith to be. Jesus you can save me but I am going to tell you how.  (11 hrs ago | post #424)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

You are so confused.  (11 hrs ago | post #423)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

They have valid Sacraments. Go for a visit. Their liturgy and building are normally pretty awesome. You can get to heaven with their sacraments. They quit believing in the Authority of Peter,s Chair but they have true apostolic succession.,  (12 hrs ago | post #421)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

The object should be eternal life.  (12 hrs ago | post #419)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

You are as confused when you talk about the Catholic Church as you are in your personal interpretation of scripture Jesus created 1 Church with the Sacraments. Not a Bible. Both existed 350 years before the Bible. The Church created the Bible. The Schism officially happened in the the 11th Century. 1 Church before then. Disagreements but 1 Church.  (12 hrs ago | post #418)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

http://www.stpeter .va.goarch.org/  (15 hrs ago | post #410)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

Make sure you get the terms right. Dogma, Doctrine and Discipline. Dogma: "The deposit of faith" (1 Tim. 6:20; 2 Tim. 1:14) is made up of the entire revelation of Jesus Christ to the Church both in Doctrine and Morals. A dogma is a truth revealed by God, and as such is proposed by the Magisterium of the Church as necessary for belief. A person remains a Catholic in good standing only if he accepts in its entirety the full revelation of the Faith in its integrity. Dogmas because they are divinely revealed cannot change. Dogmas are essential to the Faith. They cannot change. If any one dogma is denied by an individual or group of individuals the truth is not diminished by their denial, however, they remove themselves from the Body of Christ, the Church. The deliberate denial of a dogma of the Faith is called heresy. Heretics are the branches Jesus speaks of when he says: "I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from Me you can do nothing. If a man does not abide in me, he is cast forth as a branch and withers; and the branches are gathered, thrown into the fire and burned." (John 15:5-6) Dogmas are those truths revealed by Christ which have been explicitly defined by the Church through her teaching authority called the Magisterium. It is very important to remember that because these truths are essential to the Faith and have been revealed by Christ Himself they precede any Church clarification. Dogmatic pronouncements by the Church are simply clarifications of those revealed truths which have in some way been denied or challenged to the point that the Church must step forward to protect the deposit of faith from error and dilution. For instance, the dogma of Christ's Divinity, called the Hypostatic Union, was not defined by a General Ecumenical Council of the Church until the 4th Century. Nonetheless, it was always necessary for a Christian, in order to remain Christian, to believe that Jesus was not merely the Christ but was, in fact, God Himself who became a man for man's salvation. The meaning of each dogmatic truth remains the same throughout the ages and cannot change. The Modernists claim that dogmas "evolve" and actually change their meaning as man himself evolves and understands these truths in a completely different way. The Modernist does not believe in the fact that truth is absolute and immutable, for him all truth is relative and fluctuating with circumstances. The Catholic Church on the other hand recognizes the eternal immutability of the truth because it comes from God who is infinitely perfect and who does not change.  (17 hrs ago | post #407)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

St. John Chrysostom, Patriarch of Constantinople (c. 387) Peter himself the Head or Crown of the Apostles, the First in the Church, the Friend of Christ, who received a revelation, not from man, but from the Father, as the Lord bears witness to him, saying, 'Blessed art thou, This very Peter and when I name Peter I name that unbroken Rock, that firm Foundation, the Great Apostle, First of the disciples, the First called, and the First who obeyed he was guilty ...even denying the Lord." (Chrysostom, T. ii. Hom) Peter, the Leader of the choir of Apostles, the Mouth of the disciples, the Pillar of the Church, the Buttress of the faith, the Foundation of the confession, the Fisherman of the universe. (Chrysostom, T. iii Hom). Peter, that Leader of the choir, that Mouth of the rest of the Apostles, that Head of the brotherhood, that one set over the entire universe, that Foundation of the Church. (Chrys. In illud hoc Scitote) (Peter), the foundation of the Church, the Coryphaeus of the choir of the Apostles, the vehement lover of Christ ...he who ran throughout the whole world, who fished the whole world; this holy Coryphaeus of the blessed choir; the ardent disciple, who was entrusted with the keys of heaven, who received the spiritual revelation. Peter, the mouth of all Apostles, the head of that company, the ruler of the whole world. (De Eleemos, iii. 4; Hom. de decem mille tal. 3) In those days Peter rose up in the midst of the disciples (Acts 15), both as being ardent, and as intrusted by Christ with the flock ...he first acts with authority in the matter, as having all put into his hands ; for to him Christ said, 'And thou, being converted, confirm thy brethren. (Chrysostom, Hom. iii Act Apost. tom. ix.) t. Proclus, Patriarch of Constantinople (434): A disciple of St. John Chrysostom Peter, the coryphaeus of the disciples, and the one set over (or chief of) the Apostles. Art not thou he that didst say, 'Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God'? Thou Bar-Jonas (son of the dove) hast thou seen so many miracles, and art thou still but Simon (a hearer)? He appointed thee the key-bearer of Heaven, and has though not yet layed aside thy fisherman's clothing? (Proclus, Or. viii In Dom. Transfig. t. ix. Galland) St. Peter, Bishop of Alexandria (306-311) Head of the catechetical school in Alexandria, he became bishop around A.D. 300, reigning for about eleven years, and dying a martyr's death. Peter, set above the Apostles. (Peter of Alexandria, Canon. ix, Galland, iv. p. 98) St. Anthony of Egypt (330) Peter, the Prince of the Apostles (Anthony, Epist. xvii. Galland, iv p. 687) St. Athanasius (362) Rome is called the Apostolic throne. (Athanasius, Hist. Arian, ad Monach. n. 35) The Chief, Peter. (Athan, In Ps. xv. 8, tom. iii. p. 106, Migne) St. Macarius of Egypt (371) The Chief, Peter. (Macarius, De Patientia, n. 3, p. 180) Moses was succeeded by Peter, who had committed to his hands the new Church of Christ, and the true priesthood. (Macarius, Hom. xxvi. n. 23, p. 101) St. Cyril of Alexandria (c. 424)  (20 hrs ago | post #404)

Martinsville, VA

Signing off ... for now

Liturgy Of The Word Most of the Liturgy of the Word is made up of readings from Scripture. On Sundays and solemnities, there are three Scripture readings. During most of the year, the first reading is from the Old Testament and the second reading is from one of the New Testament letters. During Easter Time, the first reading is taken from the Acts of the Apostles which tells the story of the Church in its earliest days. The last reading is always taken from one of the four Gospels. In the Liturgy of the Word, the Church feeds the people of God from the table of his Word (cf. Sacrosanctum Concilium, no. 51). The Scriptures are the word of God, written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. In the Scriptures, God speaks to us, leading us along the path to salvation. The Responsorial Psalm is sung between the readings. The psalm helps us to meditate on the word of God. The high point of the Liturgy of the Word is the reading of the Gospel. Because the Gospels tell of the life, ministry, and preaching of Christ, it receives several special signs of honor and reverence. The gathered assembly stands to hear the Gospel and it is introduced by an acclamation of praise. Apart from Lent, that acclamation is "Alleluia, " derived from a Hebrew phrase meaning "Praise the Lord!" A deacon (or, if no deacon is present, a priest) reads the Gospel. After the Scripture readings, the celebrant preaches the homily. In the homily, the preacher focuses on the Scripture texts or some other texts from the liturgy, drawing from them lessons that may help us to live better lives, more faithful to Christ's call to grow in holiness. In many Masses, the Profession of Faith then follows the homily, either the Nicene or Apostles' Creed. The Nicene Creed is a statement of faith dating from the fourth century, while the Apostles' Creed is the ancient baptismal creed of the Church in Rome. If baptismal promises are renewed, from a formula based on the Apostles' Creed, this takes the place of the Creed. The Liturgy of the Word concludes with the Universal Prayer, also called the Prayer of the Faithful. The gathered assembly intercedes with God on behalf of the Church, the world, and themselves, entrusting their needs to the faithful and loving God.  (Tuesday | post #402)