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The Honolulu Advertiser

Superferry must DIE

Imagine how many of Hawaii's keiki and kupuna could be helped if that 1/3 billion dollar budget the Guv wants to "improve " Kahului Harbor wasn't wasted on projects for which there will be no use very soon. How many years did Honolulu have to wait before Pier 19 (a manini $3 or $4 million project) was finally put to use by HSF?  (Feb 12, 2008 | post #724)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Ferry screeners effective early on

The Young Bros website also has rules governing the condition and contents of any cars that it ships interisland (http://www.htbyb. com/ship_vehicles/ preparing_your_veh icle_for_shipment. asp), including these rules regarding importing plants: Free of any insect infestation, dirt, mud, and seeds - An inspection will be made of the entire vehicle both interior and exterior to ensure it is free of any dirt, mud, seeds, or other unauthorized material. Soil, sand contaminated with visible amounts of soil, and animal manure in any amount will NOT be allowed. No plant and propagative plant parts - Your vehicle will not be allowed to transport plant and propagative plant parts (e.g. roots, root stock) unless inspected at the Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) Plant Quarantine Office and will ONLY be allowed to travel on the barge accompanied by a signed HDOA certificate of inspection. No other plants will be allowed. Customers shall also comply with any and all current or future rules set by the HDOA, U.S. Department of Agriculture, FDA or other government agency for plant, or crop movement restrictions as applicable. So you see, John, rules are in place for all modes of transportation regarding inspection by the DoA, and if they had more agents, they could do a better job of enforcing the laws.  (Feb 12, 2008 | post #68)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Ferry screeners effective early on

Matson, on its website, specifies pretty much the same stipulations about having clean cars as HSF does. From the Matson Navigation website: Vehicles must be in operating condition when tendered for shipment, with a working emergency brake, and must either be licensed or qualified to be licensed for operation on public streets or highways Matson reserves the right to reject receipt of cargo if the cargo does not meet the requirements for safe transportation & handling by our stevedore or our vessel operations. Wash Vehicle All vehicles must have a clean exterior so that a vehicle survey may be conducted at the load port. Dirty vehicles will not be accepted. Note: Matson cannot ship vehicles with cracked or damaged windshields or windows. GO TO STEP 3 Remove All Personal Belongings The only items acceptable for shipment in your automobile are those tools and accessories normally attached to the vehicle, or permanently installed in the dash, doors, rear deck, or console. For example, if not bolted in, the following items should be removed: loose radios CB's tape players and tapes compact disc players and discs portable telephones of any type power boosters equalizers radar scanners extra speakers decorative ornaments auto protective covers/auto bras truck tailgate nets auto roof racks if not factory installed theft alarm systems (if you choose to leave the car alarm in your vehicle, make sure that the system is disengaged prior to shipment) **** When people fly direct from the Mainland to any island, they all have to fill out mandatory DoA declaration forms prior to landing. There are DoA agents stationed at every airport to intercept anyone who states that they are bringing in agricultural and animal products that have not been given the OK by the DoA (check out the State DoA website for things which are not allowed into the State: http://hawaii.gov/ hdoa/Info/doa_impo rting). If they had enough agents, I would like for them to perform the same kinds of inspections on all passengers, regardless of their destination and point or origin and mode of transport, just so everything is equitable. The only reason HSF is being singled out is because HSF management was stupid enough to go along with that mandate in Act 2! And ANYBODY who pleads ignorance when they get on board HSF and are carrying "contraband " items, then they are just asking for it because the HSF website makes it pretty clear what can and cannot be brought aboard the boat in cars. The DoA believes that cars on the ferry are a bigger vector for spreading invasive species than human beings riding on an airplane are. And for sure, you wouldn't have someone try to smuggle 900 imu rocks into their carry on baggage at the airport! The ferry is kinda "dead" in the water for the next 2.5 weeks, which will further erode the zeal of even more of their so-called "supporters ".  (Feb 12, 2008 | post #67)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Superferry must DIE

News from Mobile, Ala the other day regarding Austal's version of the LCS, for which they are 65% complete building a prototype: "WASHINGTON -- The Navy wants to buy three new littoral combat ships by late next year under a draft spending plan that also shows the estimated price tag of a first-of-a-kind version under construction by Austal USA in Mobile has sailed past the half-billion dollar mark. ...Now about 65 percent complete, the close-to-shore ship being built at Austal is called the Independence. It is one of two vessels already under construction. The other is being built by a group headed by Maryland-based Lockheed Martin Corp. The three ships included in the draft spending plan would be in addition to the two vessels already being built. The government has not decided who will construct the additional three ships. The LCS now being constructed at Austal carries a "total end cost" of $507 million, according to a Navy forecast released this week in connection with President Bush's proposed budget for the 2009 fiscal year that begins in October. Austal is building the ship as part of a team led by Virginia-based General Dynamics Corp. That $507 million figure represents only the tab for the seaframe, which was originally supposed to cost about $220 million, said Ronald O'Rourke, a national defense specialist with the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service. Once outfitting and other expenses are factored in, the projected price tag for the Independence climbs to $636 million, according to the Navy. That number does not include "packages " for anti-submarine measures and other missions, O'Rourke said. The numbers are far higher than what top Navy officials had previously acknowledged up until late last year. As recently as November, for example, they were saying the cost of the Independence's seaframe was 50 percent to 75 percent above the original estimate, putting the upper limit at about $390 million. ...Under the budget released this week, the Navy now tentatively plans to award a contract for a third LCS this August with two more buys next year via a competition limited to General Dynamics and Lockheed because only they have the knowledge needed "to efficiently and effectively construct these additional follow-on ships," according to a government notice last week. As was not true for the first two ships, these new contracts would carry a fixed price with an incentive for good performance and a general cost cap of $460 million each. "The devil will be in the details," DeMartini said." Full story: http://www.al.com/ news/press-registe r/index.ssf?/base/ news/1202379324331 90.xml&coll=3 Can you say BIG TIME cost overruns??? Can you say HSF is CHUMP CHANGE compared to what the Navy is offering for a contract?  (Feb 11, 2008 | post #718)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Superferry must DIE

That IS kind of ironic. Kanaloa is watching over us again. Now that HSF is out of commission for a couple of weeks, wanna bet that there are more calm days at sea than when HSF is up and running?  (Feb 11, 2008 | post #717)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Ferry screeners effective early on

There's a good reason why there are no screeners at the INTERISLAND terminals (there are at the terminals where Mainland passengers board planes, though and they make you put your stuff through the xray machines TWICE...once upon entering the main terminal area and then again when you get to the Mainland bound gates.) The reason is they don't have the money to hire the staff that would be needed. According to the DoA lady who testified both at the Maui hearings and the Special Legislature hearings, everyone pretty much agrees that the main point of entry for invasive species is Honolulu and with their limited resources, that's where they put most of their staff. This whole thing with HSF is a staffing issue for both DoA and DLNR, but Act 2 mandated that their staff be part of the inspection process for HSF. There should be a couple of bills before the Legislature this session asking for more funding to staff more inspectors. I'm pretty sure the kind of scrutiny that is occurring for HSF passengers will soon apply to interisland air passengers as well as Mainland air passengers, too, because of the heightened awareness of the devastation invasive species can cause in Hawaii.  (Feb 11, 2008 | post #48)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Superferry must DIE

Funny that your screen name implies that you don't think go! is a very good business, and yet you think HSF is??? The reason I say the cruise passengers should be paying an occupancy tax like land-based tourists is the exact same reason why you think it's ridiculous that HSF should be held to a "higher standard" for inspections than YB, Matson or the airlines. Let's level the playing field and make all tourists pay the occupancy tax, and then on the carrier side, make all modes of transportation subject to the same degree of scrutiny. Yes, for those of you intent on sneaking your 'opihi and ogo in your coolers on the airplane, I think that should be forbidden, too. I had nothing to do with Costco or KK positioning themselves at the gateway to OGG; whoever owned the land previously (A&B?) is the one who sold it to those companies. In fact, I wasn't even on the island when those decisions were made. And I don't own a B&B. But I think they don't belong in residential areas. I was just stating a fact that on Maui, visitors prefer staying in condos or B&Bs because 1) the average price of a hotel room on Maui averages somewhere around $350/night, and 2) lots of tourists would rather get away from the commercial areas of town (like Lahaina and Kaanapali) and would prefer to stay someplace more laid back...unless you happen to be a movie star. And NOONE who has concerns about HSF and who posts here has ever said we don't welcome visitors from the Neighbor Islands! Again, you're thinking only in black and white terms, when the whole HSF issue happens to be shrouded in gray areas!  (Feb 11, 2008 | post #715)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Superferry must DIE

I hereby nominate John from Albuquerque for the "Hope Springs Etermal" Award for his optimism about the continued operation of HSF. I sure hope he doesn't go down with the boat when it finally leaves town!  (Feb 10, 2008 | post #703)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Is 2008 a crossroads for Hawaii tourism?

The point is, tourists who stay in land based accomodations pay a 25% surcharge (occupancy) tax. Cruise ship passengers do not pay an occupancy tax (the logic being that they "live" aboard the boat). But cruise passengers also use county resources, and they are not paying for their use. Cruise passengers can also AFFORD to pay an occpancy surcharge (cruise passengers tend to be older and wealthier than the "bargain " tourists). I read somewhere recently that cruise passenger traffic has increased something like 20% over the last few years while other tourism has pretty much flattened out.  (Feb 10, 2008 | post #22)

The Honolulu Advertiser

So what did these officers do on Maui?

Sadly, that little saimin place down the street from Komoda Bakery (Kitada's) no longer exists.  (Feb 10, 2008 | post #18)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Is 2008 a crossroads for Hawaii tourism?

Tourism will get squeezed in 2 directions in Hawaii: On the one hand, hotel rates (especially on Maui) have gotten ridiculously expensive, while on the other hand, the County Council is clamping down on TVRs (unlicensed B&Bs and condos), which is the preferred accomodation for the majority of visitors on Maui. With no place to stay, fewer tourists will visit. That in itself would not be a bad thing, except that Maui, like most of the other islands, is so heavily dependent on the tourist dollar! Cruise ships bring lots of visitors, but the counties get no revenue from their stays (except on what the passengers purchase at stores and restaurants) because cruise passengers are not taxed for their accomodations like people who stay in hotels or other land-based housing would be. We should be taxing the cruise passengers the same way that people staying in hotels are taxed.  (Feb 10, 2008 | post #7)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Hawaiian Telcom calls in new chief executive

Yeah, and when the power goes out and your computer dies on you, you have no phone servioe. I like that "stranded " feeling, alright! Nothing like a copper line for reaching out and touching someone when the power goes out.  (Feb 9, 2008 | post #57)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Hawaiian Telcom calls in new chief executive

All Cooper did was restructure things enough so the investors at Enron, American Home, and Polaroid were able to recoup some losses. What did it do for the plain Joe workers? Zippo. It was off the blood and sweat of the employees that certain entities were able to make out like bandits!  (Feb 9, 2008 | post #55)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Superferry must DIE

Well, apparently O'Halloran lost his Admin Assistant and is looking for a new "Administrati ve Coordinator-Busine ss Development". Anybody interested? Go here to apply: https://home.eease .com/recruit/?id=3 2272  (Feb 9, 2008 | post #693)

The Honolulu Advertiser

Kamehameha assets approach $9.1 billion

The figures came from Wikipedia for Phillips Exeter Academy. And the East Coast prep schools can charge what they do because there are parents who can AFFORD those outrageous prices to get Muffy and Alice and Peter III educated. Lots of the parents' money is "old money", and many of the students are children of the foreign elite, who upon graduation, enter places like Harvard or Eaton in England. Most of the East Coast prep schools are also boarding schools, which Punahou and Iolani are not. Wikipedia citation for Phillips Exeter Academy: http://en.wikipedi a.org/wiki/Phillip s_Exeter_Academy By comparison, Harvard has an endowment worth close to $35 BILLION.  (Feb 9, 2008 | post #82)