Send a Message
to Ken Conklin

Comments

293

Joined

Mar 26, 2008

Ken Conklin Profile

Forums Owned

Recent Posts

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Put same-sex civil unions on the table - Hawaii Editorials

Here's the obvious solution to this mess, based on separation of church and state. Marriage is a sacrament bringing souls together in the presence of God. That's the domain of religion, and government should stay out of it. Any church should be able to marry same-gender or opposite-gender people according to whatever its theology might be. Sexuality is an important part of spirituality; therefore any church should be free to allow or prohibit same-gender marriages according to whatever its religious beliefs may be. Government should never certify any marriage, nor any divorce. Civil union is a legal partnership certified and enforced by the government. The partners in a civil union have rights and responsibilities as determined by the government. If the government chooses to bestow benefits to promote civil stability (such as tax breaks), it can only bestow benefits to civil unions but not to marriage (separation of church and state). People can have either a marriage, or a civil union, or both. Having one does not necessarily mean having the other. Churches are free to allow same-gender marriage or to prohibit it, because that is a matter of religion and government must not interfere. Civil unions are partnership agreements sanctioned and enforced by government. It is therefore a matter of civil rights that government must allow same-gender partners to form a civil union on the same basis as opposite-gender partners. When business partners decide to file incorporation papers the government does not inquire into whether they are same or opposite gender, whether they have a sexual relationship or what sort of sexual relationship they might have. The same should be true of domestic partnership contracts, also known as civil unions. This has been a summary of a lengthy, detailed analysis I wrote. Please see http://tinyurl.com /l8qas2  (Jan 12, 2010 | post #17)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Senators expect movement on Akaka Bill - Hawaii News

For 10 years the Akaka bill has always been passed by its committees in both the House and Senate. That's no big deal. It has happened in the 106th, 107th, 108th, 109th, 110th, and 111th Congresses -- a total of 6 times in each of the House and Senate. But it has never passed the full Senate, and hopefully it won't pass this time either. I'm sure they'd like to "pass this as quickly as possible." They've been saying that for a decade.  (Jan 11, 2010 | post #2)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Hawaiian legacy - Hawaii Features

Read again what I wrote. There's nothing about race in it. Zero. It's about patriotism vs. sedition. If the commenter knew Hawaiian history he would know there were whites and natives on both sides of the revolution of 1893. He would know that the Speaker of the House of the Republic of Hawaii was a full-blooded native Hawaiian. Remember the huge controversy over whether the "Stars and Bars" Confederate battle flag should continue to be flown over the state capitol building in South Carolina? Those who wanted to keep that flag flying -- the flag of a defeated and dead Confederacy -- were called white racists. So now, by the same (il)logic, those who favor continuing to display the symbols of a dead and defeated Kingdom of Hawaii should be called ethnic Hawaiian racists. You can't have it both ways. But once again, re-read what I wrote, read it carefully, and there's nothing you can find that advocates white supremacy or is hostile toward ethnic Hawaiians. I wrote about one multiracial government which was pushed aside by another multiracial government, and whether the continued celebration of the symbols of a dead former regime should be called "patriotism " or whether it should be called "sedition. " I'm sick and tired of seeing only the Hawaiian flag flying on top of 'Iolani Palace, just as I know most of the people in South Carolina were sick and tired of seeing the Stars and Bars flying over their state capitol. I'm sick of seeing a corrupt and evil ex-queen celebrated as though she were some sort of a goddess, with the celebrants using her as a figurehead for their secessionist movement.  (Jan 10, 2010 | post #5)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Na la nui o ke Aupuni Mo'A - Hawaii Editorials

Wow. These clowns still don't get it. Everything they have written has zero relevance to what was in the newspaper article and also zero relevance to what I said. They are so full of themselves, trying to talk stink about me when they can't even focus in anything relevant. Maybe they're on ice or crack or something. Or just plain insane.  (Jan 10, 2010 | post #7)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Hawaiian legacy - Hawaii Features

Regarding the display of Hawaiian Kingdom political symbols after 1893 and especially after 1898 -- was it patriotism, or was it sedition? The closest analogy I can think of is the public display of the Nazi swastika in Germany after 1945. It's illegal to do that. In fact, it's illegal for anyone to speak or write anything favorable to the Nazi regime or the concept of Aryan racial supremacy. Such displays would not be regarded as "patriotic ", they would be treated as socially boorish and legally criminal. The Provisional Government of 1893, Republic of Hawaii of 1894-1898, and U.S. government after that, were extraordinarily gentle in their treatment of the royalists. Freedom of the press was suspended for only a few weeks following the revolution, and then the Hawaiian-language newspapers cranked it up again and started spewing their royalist propaganda without being in any way restricted by the new government. Even during her period as a prisoner in the Palace in 1895 for conspiracy in the Wilcox counterrevolution, Liliuokalani was given the freedom to sew her political protest quilt which included the monarchial flag and political slogans. Tolerance of dissent does not change that dissent from sedition into patriotism.  (Jan 10, 2010 | post #1)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Mystery relic in search of a home - Hawaii Features

" ... a secret gift of royalist solidarity from Queen Victoria"??? "Maybe Victoria sent it to the deposed Hawaiian queen as a kind of royal-sister solidarity gift." That's a fabulous conspiracy theory, and typical of the genre. Total baloney. So far as I'm aware (I'd like to be corrected if I'm wrong), the real Queen (Victoria) never communicated with the ex-queen (Liliuokalani) after the revolution of 1893. But more importantly, in Fall 1894, after the Republic of Hawaii sent out letters requesting formal diplomatic recognition de jure, Queen Victoria personally signed a lovely letter to Hawaii President Sanford B. Dole recognizing the Republic as the rightful government; and she signed her letter "Your friend, Victoria" Photos of 20 such letters personally signed by emperors, kings, queens, and presidents, including Queen Victoria, can be seen at http://tinyurl.com /4wtwdz Royal-sister solidarity gift? Total nonsense.  (Jan 10, 2010 | post #1)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Na la nui o ke Aupuni Mo'A - Hawaii Editorials

This is a very funny comment. Very interesting because everything in it is totally inappropriate and clearly displays both the ignorance and racism of the writer. 1. Haole trying to tell other racers how to run their lives? Apparently the commenter thinks the Hawaiian Kingdom was only about people of one race. Commenting on the national holidays of a multiracial nation cannot in any way be regarded as directed against any particular race. The commenter is clearly preoccupied with race. 2. "There goes the haole again." How does the commenter know I'm a haole? And so what anyway? What if I were Filipino, would the commenter start out the comment by saying "there goes the filipino again"? 3. "...you at least learned how to say dates." What the heck are you talking about? The only date I mentioned was January 17, 1893. But even regarding that date, there was nothing special about the way I said it. What the heck are you talking about? 4. "Your rudimentary knowledge of Hawaiian at least is at kindergarten level." Huh? I did not write any portion of my comment in Hawaiian language. How do you know what my level of Hawaiian language knowledge is? That entire comment by "elijahhawaii " shows him/her to be a total ignoramus and idiot. Can't even do a decent job of ad hominem argument or character assassination.  (Jan 9, 2010 | post #3)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Na la nui o ke Aupuni Mo'A - Hawaii Editorials

The best Kingdom holiday that should be celebrated is January 17, in honor of the revolution of 1893. Those celebratory devices remaining after New Years can be put to good use -- fireworks, noisemakers, party hats, and the little paper umbrellas that decorate a mai tai. It's a real stretch to have a holiday for Leleiohoku, also known as Billy Pitt. He died at age 23 and thus had very few accomplishments. Perhaps his greatest accomplishment is that he died, thereby opening the door for his sister Lydia to be named crown princess to succeed Kalakaua. But then, she didn't turn out to be so terrific either. Actually, since our nation is the U.S., those wanting to revive the royal holidays might consider celebrating the birthday of King George II.  (Jan 9, 2010 | post #1)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Ex-prosecutor Kubo tapped to be circuit judge - Hawaii News

I am very pleased with this nomination, partly because Mr. Kubo comes from a background as prosecutor rather than defense attorney. Too many judges started out as defense attorneys and then, as judges, gave far too much leeway to defense attorneys during trial and were far too lenient in sentencing. Remember former Hawaii Judge Sandra Simms? Remember Judge Ito in the O.J. Simpson trial? Mr. Kubo has been responsible for finding and arresting some really bad guys, and then prosecuting them vigorously. Hawaii needs more judges who have a strong law-and-order orientation.  (Jan 5, 2010 | post #1)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Inouye confident Akaka Bill issues will be resolved - Haw...

<"Certain changes had to be made because of constitutionality, " said Inouye.> Let's rephrase that slightly. "The Akaka bill we have been pushing for ten years was unconstitutional all along, despite our claims that it was perfectly fine; so now we're putting in some new language to try to cover up that small problem," said Inouye.  (Dec 31, 2009 | post #9)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Roadblock continues despite 7 arrests in Laie land disput...

The photo showed a protester holding a sign that said "Aloha kekahi i kekahi." How weird is that! It's supposed to mean "Love one another" or, informally "Can't we all just get along?" An aggressor (like the lady holding that sign) has no business whatsoever (ab)using that slogan. It's like saying "We'll all get along just fine as soon as you do what I tell you to do."  (Dec 30, 2009 | post #21)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Letters to the editor - Hawaii Editorials

To David Chappell: First of all, ethnic Hawaiians are not an indigenous people. See http://tinyurl.com /33br3 Second, they are already fully assimilated. Therefore the Akaka bill is not an attempt to preserve a separate and distinct people, but rather an attempt to take a fully integrated population and carve out one racial group. Third, we have nothing to fear from the United Nations. If you think the United Nations is capable of protecting ethnic minorities, go tell that to the minorities in Zimbabwe, Rwanda, Sudan, China, etc.  (Dec 26, 2009 | post #3)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Letters to the editor - Hawaii Editorials

Thank you David Bohn. Finally we have a real Indian telling the truth that "Native Hawaiians" were never an Indian tribe. Now, go tell that to the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. Oops, that committee just last week passed the new Kaka bill. Too late. Too bad you didn't speak up earlier.  (Dec 23, 2009 | post #6)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Early ag lands identified - Hawaii News

Excellent article. One of the best the Star Bulletin has published recently. I greatly respect and admire Sam Gon's expertise and the work he has been doing for many years to do serious research on ancient Hawaiian cultural and environmental practices, and to bring the culture alive through reviving the language and protocols. Sam Gon is an amazing, very impressive fellow.  (Dec 21, 2009 | post #14)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Letters to the Editor - Letters

Thanks to Leon Siu for his letter. But Leon apparently does not know that Inouye was actually caught red-handed inserting the Akaka bill secretly into an appropriations bill, which then got passed during the last week of Congress in December 2000; and the Akaka bill then had to be surgically removed by passing a concurrent resolution of both the House and Senate on the last day before adjournment. See the details at http://tinyurl.com /6e4ph Inouye did it again in December 2001. He buried the Akaka bill in section 8,132 of the massive Defense Appropriations bill HR.3338 in a single sentence as follows: "SEC. 8132. The provisions of S. 746 of the 107th Congress, as reported to the Senate on September 21, 2001, are hereby enacted into law." Inouye's colleagues had to put the Senate into recess. They took INouye into the cloak room for a thrashing, and then ten minutes Inouye apologized -- sort of -- with a lame excuse. Read all about it at http://tinyurl.com /628zm  (Dec 20, 2009 | post #17)

Q & A with Ken Conklin

Headline:

Kokokahi -We are all one blood

Neighborhood:

He'eia, Kane'ohe

Read My Forum Posts Because:

I back things up with facts.

Blog / Website / Homepage:

http://tinyurl.com/6gkzk

I Believe In:

Unity, Equality, Aloha for all